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Author Topic: Todd's Annual Rite of Spring, 2016 . . .  (Read 3392 times)
Oldcarsarecool
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« on: April 03, 2016, 11:48:57 PM »

Todd's Annual Rite of Spring, 2016 .  .  .





Hello and welcome to the 2016 edition of the story of my annual gardening adventures.  What began in 2010 as a "Anyone know what this is ?" post has evolved into being able to actually recognize some plants by name.  What started out as a Hey, look at this thing I found in my yard !" post has gradually become an honest attempt at a primitive form of landscape design.  What has not changed, however, is my "I wonder if this will work ?" philosophy of gardening as a whole.  Adding that variable to the equation results in me not really knowing as much as the scope of my pictures implies.  Although I have tried to pay attention over the years and put some of what I've learned to good use.  Some ideas were really good, others tried to work but never really got off the ground, (or in this case, out of the ground), and some were completely misguided from the start.  And every year, the results are chronicled herein.

I've been telling the story of my gardening adventures since 2010 when this whole new world of making things grow began to appeal to my senses as a homeowner.  Until that time, my focus had always been on keeping what was already in place neat and tidy.  So the grass was mowed, the shrubs were trimmed, and yard debris was bagged and hauled away.  My tiny property in Pennsylvania made this rather easy.


June 11, 2003



Things got a little more challenging when I moved to Columbia, Missouri in June 2003.  My then-wife and I upgraded from the mobile home in Pennsylvania to a small home in a nice neighborhood on the city's north side.  The front yard was in nice shape when we moved in, meaning I didn't have to do anything other than maintain what was in place.


July 25, 2003



The back yard was much larger in size and quite visually appealing.  Good maintenance was all that was needed here as well.  I don't remember why I was up on the roof on that day back in September 2003.  But I took my camera with me and snapped a few pics of the yard from a different perspective.  My property extended to just behind the three bushes in the center of the photo below.


September 19, 2003



The move into our new home Athens, Georgia in May 2009 represented quite a change from the past in three very significant ways .  .  .  





-  Visually  -
The most obvious change to this point is the overall size of what I have to work with.  I've got a lot of space with which to play !


April 7, 2010



My 45' x 140' lot in Pennsylvania is positively tiny compared to the .7 acres I have now.


April 17, 2010






-  Mentally  -
Living in a mobile home trailer on a tiny lot in Pennsylvania didn't really provide motivation to be creative.  The move to Columbia gave me much more space to work with and significantly uplifted my spirits.  But I knew from the get-go that my stay was going to be temporary.  Moving to Athens was viewed from the beginning as more permanent in nature.


April 10, 2010



Knowing that I was going to be here for a while provided enough incentive to personalize the space.  And I sure did !  The bare front yard seen above has become mine.  I won't be featured on the neighborhood Spring Garden Tour.  But that's ok.  I've had a great time over the last 5 years getting to where I am.


June 6, 2015






-  Physically  -
The growing season is much longer in this region than what I was typically used to further north and allows me to play outside longer.  The definition of "winter" in this part of the country is very different from what I experienced in either Pennsylvania or Missouri.  I've shoveled snow and gone skiing in November many times in Pennsylvania.  Not in Georgia !  After I ended the story of my 2015 Yard Adventure in October, I was still working in the yard all the way into the middle of November !  


November 11, 2015



My friend Heather gave me some more Mystery Bulbs over the summer that she had dug up from her yard.  I planted them in October only because that seems to be when such things are done.  The unusual stretch of warmth seen here recently had them confused causing them to grow not too long after I planted them.





I took advantage of the unusual warmth to clean up the debris that had accumulated over the fall.  


November 14, 2015



I've been using the mulched debris as a border for my "Random Curved Shape."





I moved the Small Anise Tree earlier in the fall to a location more suitable for its size.  There was plenty of debris in the yard for enough homemade mulch to connect everything together.  I did what I could on that day back in November to make everything look nice.  When spring arrives, I'll mulch up the winter debris and enhance the border as needed.  But for now, this will be fine.





So I've got a large canvas to work with, plenty of motivation knowing I'm not going anywhere anytime soon, and a longer period of time to play.  It's time to get this year's show underway .  .  .
« Last Edit: April 15, 2016, 12:08:59 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2016, 11:13:52 PM »

Breaking out the mower .  .  .
February 6 - 7, 2016





My adventure usually begins in February with gathering and mulching the debris that has fallen over the winter.  I posted pictures above from November when I did some cleaning/mulching at the end of the season last year.  The Sweet Gum tree, multiple pine trees, and various hardwoods dropped a lot of leaves and needles since then, hence the mess shown below.





The photo above shows the area beside the garage where I planted some more Mystery Bulbs.  The warm Holiday Season confused them slightly and caused them to appear through the debris.  The same is true with the group of Daffodils I relocated from the back yard to this location last year.  I have to be careful not to break anything when gathering up the pine needles.





I also relocated some Crocus bulbs to this area last year.  They appear to be happy with the move.





The plan for this Saturday afternoon was to make a pass with the bag attached to the mower to turn all the debris into a homemade mulch to be used as a border around the shape.  I had previously used the homemade mulch only to fill in the gaps between the groups of plants.  This year, I wanted to try using it as an actual border.  The photo below gives you a general idea of what I had in mind. 





Previously, I had used only the black mulch from Lowe's around the pear tree and ornamental grass plants.  This year, I wanted to use black mulch again around the tree and grass plants, but also surround the whole area with the homemade mulch.  I actually think my goal is to surround the entire shape.  But the size of that project means it will have to be done in steps.





You don't realize just how much yard you are working with until you actually start spreading mulch.  What looks like a lot of debris in the yard doesn't actually cover a whole lot once it's ground up with the mower.  Good thing I've got more leaves and pine needles in the back yard.





My neighbor told me that now is the time to cut the Yellow Flag Irises back to the ground, which I did.  I plan on using red mulch in that area.





I mowed until it got dark, and made quite a bit of progress.








Sunday was more of the same - mow, bag, pour, repeat.





Slowly but surely, the piles started to add up.





I grabbed a rake and started to smooth out the numerous piles I had made.





I left the area around the palm tree bare temporarily.  The Creeping Phlox plants that surround the tree is one of those ideas that never really performed as expected.  So they are getting moved.  But for now, all I'm doing is cleaning up.  This is a good start .  .  .


« Last Edit: April 10, 2016, 12:10:12 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2016, 12:08:45 AM »

Not sure what I want to do this year .  .  .
February 21 & 28, 2016
Part 1 of 2





My front yard adventure began in April 2012 when I planted the October Glory Maple tree in the center of the yard.  I was merely looking for more shade rather than trying to creating a "garden," and figured a 50 foot maple tree would do the trick, even though it would take a few years to get there.


April 21, 2012



One full year would pass before I added the next resident, the Cleveland Select Flowering Pear tree.  By this time, I had been experimenting with color in other areas of the yard, and thought a flowering tree in front of my living room window would be pretty cool in the spring.


April 14, 2013



I waited another year before adding the Star Magnolia and Dogwood Cherokee Princess.  It was around this time that I was actually beginning to wonder if I could turn the weeds that made up my front lawn into some kind of garden space.  This trend would continue through the end of the season when the basic foundation began to take shape.


July 5, 2014



In other words, the first several years of my playing in the yard were just that - playing.  I may have thought about a few ideas here and there.  But I didn't have the tools to act on them.  It wasn't until last season's adventure that I actually started to design something, even though I was more or less making it up as I went along.  What began as a large blank canvas in need of some character .  .  .


February 7, 2015



.  .  . had become quite large and much more intricate by year's end.


September 20, 2015



I'm extremely happy with the results.  But I also realize that my canvas is no longer blank, and what remains isn't really that large.  A project like this can go from appropriate for the space to overcrowded and confusing very easily.  I've reached the point where planting things at random like I did in the past may not work as well as it used to.  The good news is that it's still February, and as I posted earlier, all I'm doing at this point is cleaning up from the winter.  And what usually happens after I'm done cleaning up ?


February 9, 2016



TWO DAYS after I attacked the winter debris from the last post, Mother Nature reminded me of the fact that She and only She is in charge of such things around here.


February 9, 2016



The good news is that Mother Nature stuck with the normal pattern which states, a)  Temperatures moderate significantly throughout the month of February in this part of the country, and b)  Any solid white precipitation that falls from the sky during this time doesn't stick around very long, if at all.  Athens had already been flirting with 70 degrees by month's end, thus eliminating any memory of winter, and initiating the "waking up" process for the spring.


February 21, 2016



Over the last several years, I've discovered quite a few bulb flowers scattered about the yard, and have recently been trying to move them all into the area next to the garage.  The Crocus bulbs shown above and below were originally in the back yard and were moved to this location late last year next to the bulbs I planted here before.





The second group of Mystery Bulbs I planted here also seem to be doing quite well.





I see a few of them look like they are about to bloom, which means I can identify them.


« Last Edit: April 13, 2016, 12:37:24 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2016, 12:08:57 AM »

continued .  .  .
Part 2 of 2




The Daffodils shown below have called several places in the yard "home" over the last few years.  A lot of them were near the mailbox when I moved in.  When the initial relocation to the back patio area didn't work out, I moved all of them again, this time to the area shown below near the garage.


February 21, 2016



Judging by the rate of growth, they appear to be ok with the move.  Hopefully, I'll see some flowers soon.


February 28, 2016



The second group of Mystery Bulbs given to me by my friend, Heather, apparently contained a few Daffodils.





In other words, I've planted and relocated enough bulbs of all kinds to this area that I'm not sure what's what anymore.  But the flowers shown below definitely look like Daffodils.


 


So that means I've got a few Crocus bulbs, a few Daffodils, some Tulips, and a bunch of TBDs.








The Bridal Wreath Spirea at the mailbox is beginning to wake up for the season, and does so at a pretty good pace.


February 21, 2016



February 28, 2016



The driveway Azaleas will be doing their thing pretty soon.  I learned my lesson two years ago and successfully resisted the urge to prune them last fall.  So they should bloom profusely this year.





I'm not quite sure why.  But the Star Magnolia, while green and growing, has never really flowered like I was under the impression it would.  





But this year, I appear to have one flower.  I'll take it !





The Japanese Camellia is usually the first plant to produce blooms each spring, and this year was no exception.  The unusual warmth over the Holiday Season confused it slightly and woke it up earlier than normal.  This is ok, as it seems to continue to flower without any ill effects.





So everything seems to be happening right on schedule.  I need to put my thinking cap on and come up with some kind of plan for this season .  .  .
« Last Edit: April 12, 2016, 01:19:58 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2016, 10:00:25 PM »

Getting started .  .  .
March 4 - 6, 2016
Part 1 of 2




It's time to see what I'm working with this season.  I mentioned above that I'm not sure how to proceed regarding possible expansion of the existing design.  Adding more needs to be done carefully so as not to create a crowded mess.  And I have no idea how to actually do that.  But I know for sure that what is in place now needs to be maintained.  So I've got that on tap for this weekend.

But first, I wanted to continue the cleanup I started over the last few weekends, beginning with the small area by the garage.  Truth be told, this area has become somewhat of a mess.  Both rose bushes have repeatedly expressed their dissatisfaction ever since going in the ground in 2014.  Precisely NONE of the 7 ornamental grass plants I bordered the area with survived.  The Crocus bulbs and Tulips I planted did well, but the Alliums have never bloomed.  Now I have a bunch of Mystery Bulbs scattered about that became confused by the warm Holiday Season and started growing, but never flowered.  I have no idea what to do here other than clean up the debris and hope for the best.





But not all is lost.  All the Crocus bulbs, (i.e. those I moved from the back yard, and those I planted from scratch), appear to be happy.  I know that some of the Mystery Bulbs my friend, Heather, gave me last year are Daffodils.  A few of them are blooming nicely.  And I see the Tulips are starting to appear.





I've been concerned about the Chinese Snowball I moved last fall because it dropped all of its leaves immediately after.  I was really hoping that was because winter was approaching.  But this is me we're dealing with, so anything is possible.





I see new growth, which makes me quite happy !  Hopefully, I can rest easy knowing I didn't kill it by moving it.  





I also see a bunch of those small grenades from the Sweet Gum Tree all over the place.  The Sweet Gum tree is just out of view to the left in the photo below.  It leaves its mark in the form of those little grenades all over this side of the yard.  I have no idea when they are supposed to fall.  But it seems like I'm always having to clean them up.





There is a large pine tree out of view to the right in the photo below.  This means I've got pine cones everywhere on this side of the yard.  Mowing either side sounds like fireworks with many small explosions on one side and fewer but more intense explosions on the other.





But none of this is bad by any means.  A periodic mowing over the winter helps keep the mess manageable.  





Another passing week means more growth on the Bridal Wreath Spirea.





I'm just beginning to see some color appear on the driveway azaleas.  The red/white combo next to the street usually wakes up first.  Usually.





I say "usually" because the goofy Korean Azalea started blooming during the warm Holiday Season.  There's hardly any leaves on it, but it's blooming.  It's still green and growing, but has never thrived as well as I had expected.  But it blooms, and has done so since I planted it in 2014.  Very confusing.





I don't encounter much drama with the patio area in the back yard.  I've got some weeds to take care of.  But all is well.





The Blue Arrows Rush grass I planted here last fall seems to be doing ok.  These plants call for part shade, which is why I put them in the back yard.  Well, that and they were on sale.





The Japanese Boxwood shrubs next to the back porch were part of the first group of new tenants I planted in my yard.  They went in the ground in March 2012 after I finished building the patio.  





There used to be a Buckeye tree in the center of the back yard.  But it got moved earlier.  I finally decided to cut down the dead tree near the fence that had been in its vine-covered state since I moved in.  The Buckeye tree looked like it would fit perfectly in that spot.





Just like the Chinese Snowball, I was concerned about how the Buckeye would react to being moved.  





Seeing new growth makes me happy !


« Last Edit: April 13, 2016, 12:42:26 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2016, 10:00:38 PM »

continued .  .  .
Part 2 of 2





I mentioned earlier that maintenance was one of the items on this weekend's agenda.  One of the "Gardening Tips" from my neighborhood newsletter suggests changing mulch yearly to prevent disease.  The rest of the online world, however, seems to believe mulch needs to be replenished when needed, not replaced completely.  Organic mulch, by its nature, decomposes over time.  Adding new mulch to replace what has been lost should be done on an as needed basis.  I've added a lot of mulch to my yard, which means I'll probably need to keep adding a lot of mulch as a result of decomposition.  I was really happy with last year's experiment with a black/red alternating color scheme of mulch.  Continuing to evolve that idea seems like something that could work.  I was also pleased with using my homemade mulch as a thick border separating the two colors.  So I started this round of maintenance at the pear tree, which got black mulch.





The three Crape Myrtles I planted last year all got red mulch.





The photos below give you an idea of what I'm aiming for - alternating colors separated by the homemade mulch.  





The Windmill Palm tree, another idea that has never really worked from the start, got black mulch.





The Small Anise tree got red mulch.





The Japanese Maple tree given to me by a coworker got black mulch.





So that's the basic pattern.





I mentioned last time that I wanted to move the Creeping Phlox plants, ditto another idea that has never really worked, away from the Windmill Palm tree.  These guys seemed to be small enough to fit behind the rose bushes.  And since that area is a mess anyways, I decided to go for it.





Heading the other direction, the maple tree got black mulch, followed by the Yellow Flag Irises with red mulch.  Originally, I had black mulch in place when I first relocated the irises back in 2014, and haven't replenished it since.  I used red mulch to keep the pattern going.





Here's where the pattern gets a little skewed.  I decided to use red mulch around the Dogwood Cherokee Princess and Star Magnolia despite being next to the irises.  It seems like red works better in this case because the edges of the design are done in black.





So that's where I stand.





I've still got a bunch of work to do.  But this is a good start to the season .  .  .


« Last Edit: April 10, 2016, 10:05:47 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2016, 01:43:37 AM »

An unplanned expansion .  .  .
March 13, 2016
Part 1 of 2




I use the term "unplanned" because I wasn't looking to do any kind of planting just yet.  My original plan was to give myself at least to the first UGA Horticulture Club plant sale, (beginning of April), before breaking out the shovel.  This would give me enough time to get the winter debris cleaned up and see what I'm working with this season.  You can probably guess from the title to this entry that this idea didn't work as planned.  We'll get to those details shortly.  But first, I always like to take a walk around the yard and see what's happening.

It's been one week since I moved the Creeping Phlox plants to the area next to the garage.  They're all still green, which is a good sign.





The goofy Korean Azalea, while looking like a cluster of sticks, is still flowering.





This is the time of year when things happen fast.  Seeing a hint of color means good things are on the horizon.  The azalea next to the street is waking up on schedule.





Even though I keep calling it "the azalea," it's actually a cluster of several azaleas, half of which are red and the other half white.  The red half awakens first followed immediately by the white half.





Another week passed means more growth from the Bridal Wreath Spirea.





The same thing is true here.  Once a hint of color is spotted, it won't be long until the whole thing turns white with flowers.





This is a good sign !  The Goldmound Spirea shrubs I planted last year were completely dormant for a long time, and now appear to be waking up for the season.  





Ditto the Yarrow Coronation Gold !  They did their thing last year, then went dormant for the winter.  Seeing them return is a good thing.





Last year was very significant for me in that the first group of Mystery Bulbs given to me by my friend, Heather, actually bloomed, (something I waited 3 years for !).  I cut them back over the winter, and now see them starting to grow again.





I don't know if I'm going to see any actual flowers from the Buckeye tree.  This is what it has done since I planted it.  





But at least it's green and growing.





The Persian Lilac I bought on sale last fall is also beginning to wake up for the season.  I remember seeing a small cluster of flowers during the warm period over the Holiday Season.  





I'm not seeing any flowers now, but that's ok.





The three Japanese Boxwood shrubs I planted back in 2012 have worked out exactly as I had hoped.  I've never encountered any drama from them.  Looks like they could use a trim this year .  .  .


« Last Edit: April 14, 2016, 12:25:37 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2016, 01:43:48 AM »

continued .  .  .
Part 2 of 2





Like I said, I didn't have any intention of planting anything today.  That lasted until I was walking around the yard taking the pics I posted above.  I discovered the small azalea shown below by accident several years ago.  It was originally on the other side of the yard completely surrounded by, and beginning to be overtaken by English Ivy.  


March 30, 2013



So I moved it next to the driveway by all the other azaleas.  Its small size made me wonder if I could use it to fill in a gap in the middle of one of the oddly shaped azaleas in that location, (which turned out to be another of my many "what were you thinking" decisions).  It survived the move, but never really grew.  Seeing it today was enough for me to realize that it had to be moved again.  So out came the shovel.





The area next to the pear tree seemed like it would work well because, a) it would allow me to creating another 90 degree bend in my "Random Curved Shape," and b) it would be sunnier than where I had it before.  So I grabbed the shovel and started digging.





After the move, I realized that I needed more mulch, which Lowe's just happened to have on sale this weekend.  





Mulch is one of those things I always seem to need.  The "4 for $10" ad got my attention.  I brought several of each color home.  





So I'm walking through Lowe's getting mulch.  The thoughts of not planning to plant anything yet, and of how that worked out were still fresh in my mind when I happened upon several Reeves Spirea shrubs.  I love the spirea I have at the mailbox, and thought these would look great in the yard as well.  Resistance is futile.  





I put all three of them together in between the pear tree and the newly relocated small azalea.  





These spireas should get pretty big.  I figured a cluster of three of them would look great each spring when they're in bloom.





In keeping with the pattern, the spireas got red mulch.  The small azalea got black mulch.  Everything got surrounded by the homemade brown mulch.





My "Random Curved Shape" now has two 90 degree bends, making the whole design look like a wavy letter "T" .  .  .


« Last Edit: April 13, 2016, 01:23:17 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2016, 12:05:25 AM »

Enjoying the color .  .  .
March 21 - 28, 2016
Part 1 of 4




After last week's unplanned expansion, I decided to give this "not planting anything until the first UGA Horticulture Plant Sale" idea another try.  I am weak.  But hopefully, I can keep myself under control for the next two weeks.  In my favor is the fact that the beautiful colors in the yard offer a nice distraction from the urge to plant stuff.  I spent this week admiring Mother Nature's handy work.  And sneezing.


March 21, 2016



Sneezing, coughing, wheezing, eyes watering, etc.  It's normal this time of year.


March 21, 2016



I feel sorry for the Cirrus having to sit outside, and should be more fastidious in keeping it washed and waxed.


March 24, 2016



I'm still hoping to see some flowers on the Buckeye tree in the back yard.


March 21, 2016






But it doesn't seem like that's going to happen.  It hasn't produced any blooms since I planted it in 2014, which may be due in part to where I had it planted.  Moving it recently probably didn't help matters any.


March 28, 2016



The photo below is of a neighbor's Buckeye tree.  They're hard to spot against a pink azalea background.  But clusters of red flowers can be seen.


A neighbor's Buckeye tree



The greenish clusters that can be seen in the center of the photo below should be producing the same red flowers, but aren't for some reason.  But it seems to be happy otherwise.  I'm happy knowing I didn't kill it by moving it.





I think the recent warmth played havoc with the Persian Lilac.  I saw a purple flower over the winter, but nothing now.


March 21, 2016



Redbud trees are quite popular in this area.  I've discovered several in my yard over the years.  The oddly shaped Redbud shown below is actually my neighbor's, but sits right on the property line.


March 21, 2016



March 24, 2016



There are two by the fence in my yard.


March 21, 2016



Cutting back all the vines and English Ivy seems to have been quite beneficial for them, as they bloom better each year .  .  .


March 24, 2016
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« Reply #9 on: April 17, 2016, 12:06:36 AM »

continued .  .  .
Part 2 of 4





This makes me smile !  The Creeping Phlox plants I moved two weeks ago are starting to bloom. 


March 28, 2016



I keep preparing to write them off every year, only to see a few flowers appear in the spring. 


March 28, 2016



Hopefully, they will be happier in this location.


March 24, 2016



I also see that one of the second group of Mystery Bulbs I planted here is flowering.  Not sure what this is.  But the name Grape Hyacinth comes to mind.


March 24, 2016



I think I'm going to move the Eleanor Tabor Indian Hawthorn to a sunnier location.  It grows well where it currently is in front of the house, but doesn't really flower that much.  I have a feeling more sun will be beneficial.  The tag that came with it suggests "6+ hours of direct sunlight."  Being against the house hinders this somewhat.


March 21, 2016



Seeing flowers on it this year is a good thing, though.  Not a frequent thing, but good nonetheless.





The Cleveland Select Flowering Pear tree is growing beautifully and is perfectly shaped.  It doesn't flower that much, though.  Not sure why.


March 21, 2016



It grows quickly.  The differences between the photo above and three days later in the photo below are very evident.


March 24, 2016



The Japanese Camellia does its thing every year and looks great.  The blooms must add quite a bit of weight .  .  .


February 28, 2016



March 21, 2016



March 24, 2016
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« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2016, 12:07:36 AM »

continued .  .  .
Part 3 of 4





The small azalea I moved last week is blooming nicely !


March 21, 2016



March 24, 2016



I hope this little guy does alright in this location.  The deep red flowers add some great color to this part of the yard.


March 28, 2016



The first new additions of the season are doing well.  


March 21, 2016



March 24, 2016



The idea is to have three large white Reeves Spireas blooming next to the deep red azalea.  Time will tell.  


March 28, 2016



Good things are happening elsewhere in front.  


Ruby Loropetalum



Yellow Flag Irises



Happy Returns Day Lilies



Coronation Gold Yarrows



Husker Red Beardtongues



Dogwood Cherokee Princess



Dogwood Cherokee Brave (I think, not sure really)



This is also the time of year when the Yoshino Cherry tree peaks.  It looks fabulous as usual .  .  .


March 24, 2016



« Last Edit: April 17, 2016, 02:05:37 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2016, 12:10:05 AM »

continued .  .  .
Part 4 of 4





I've said before that the Bridal Wreath Spirea at the mailbox has never failed to amaze each spring, and this year is no different.


March 21, 2016



March 24, 2016



March 28, 2016



And the driveway azaleas are doing their thing beautifully.


March 21, 2016



March 24, 2016



March 28, 2016



I enjoy seeing the progression of growth because it happens so fast.


March 21, 2016



March 24, 2016



March 28, 2016



March 24, 2016



March 28, 2016



So far, so good.  The beginning of April and the first UGA Horticulture Plant Sale will be here soon.  But until then, I can enjoy the colors .  .  .
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« Reply #12 on: April 20, 2016, 01:18:28 AM »

Another new tenant .  .  .
April 2, 2016
Part 1 of 2




The UGA Horticulture Club usually holds its first plant sale of the year at the beginning of April.  It's become a happy time of year for me ever since I've been exploring this gardening phenomenon.  I saw the tables being set up and plants being delivered to the greenhouses next to my shop on Thursday on my way to work.  This meant my plans for Saturday got re-prioritized, (not like I had anything planned anyways).  As has been the case with previous plant sales, I don't have any specific ideas in mind.  I mentioned earlier that I am trying to concentrate on keeping the number of new tenants to a minimum until I figure out how to properly utilize the space I have.  The way I do this will remain the same as it has always been - wander aimlessly for a while until something jumps out at me and "clicks."  So it's off to the plant sale.  But first, I like to take a walk in the yard to see how this past week progressed.





Relocating the Creeping Phlox plants seems to have been a good idea, as they are responding quite nicely.





The relocated azalea and new Reeves Spireas are doing well.  It looks like the azalea has peaked as far as blooms is concerned.  Hopefully I can get it to grow now.  





It's hard to see due to the lighting in the photo below.  But the three Crape Myrtles I planted last year are beginning to wake up for the season.





The photos above and below show the progress made by everything out front.  The Yellow Flag Irises aren't blooming yet, but are around 1 foot tall.  The previously brown Goldmound Spirea and Coronation Gold Yarrow shrubs have been turning green over the last few weeks.  And there's a bit of activity from the Happy Returns Day Lilies around the maple tree.





The Leaning Tower of Dogwood is looking good.





I see a couple of dead branches I need to prune.  But all is well otherwise.





The Bridal Wreath Spirea looks great !





The driveway azaleas seem to be peaking about now.








All the colors are in place .  .  .


« Last Edit: April 21, 2016, 01:12:08 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


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« Reply #13 on: April 20, 2016, 01:18:55 AM »

continued .  .  .
Part 2 of 2





I probably spent a good hour or so wandering around the UGA Hort. Club plant sale trying to sort the various ideas appearing out of nowhere, and chatting with the staff about each idea's feasibility.  Some of the Grad Students who work the sales are starting to recognize me, not quite sure if this is good or bad, though.  After much walking, daydreaming, envisioning, and chatting, I settled on a Vitex Shoal Creek.  





The Vitex Agnus-Castus is commonly known as a Chaste Tree or Chasteberry Tree.  It has the potential to reach 15 feet tall, which would be great !  Like the Crape Myrtle, it should bloom in the summer.  It will eventually look like this:



(from Wikipedia)


The large potential size made me think placing it behind the smaller shrubs would be best, (i.e. the "feature tree" idea my neighbor mentioned before).  So I settled on an area next to the Japanese Maple beside the driveway.  





I used red mulch to keep the alternating pattern going.





I need to remove the weeds/grass around the perimeter of the mulch bed and fire up the lawn mower to make some more brown mulch to fill in the gaps, which I'll do later.  I think this will look good .  .  .


« Last Edit: April 21, 2016, 11:50:31 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #14 on: April 27, 2016, 01:02:25 AM »

An interesting discovery .  .  .
April 5, 2016
Part 1 of 2





So I have this Japanese Maple tree in my front yard by the driveway.





A coworker gave it to me last year.  Following some advice from my neighbor, I planted it in the style of a "feature tree."  The idea is that it will get to be a decent size.  Planting it toward the rear of the front yard will draw the viewer's eyes over everything else.  Good idea.





During one of my many "wandering aimlessly" picture taking adventures, I discovered what looks like another Japanese Maple tree buried in among some shrubs in the back yard.  I had no clue it was there !





My property is separated from my neighbor's property by a bunch of what I'll call "privacy" hedges that grow profusely and make a good "fence."  I found this little guy growing in among them.  Both the location and how it may have ended up there make no sense.  I grabbed the shovel and moved it to an area that gets a little more sunlight, which will work nicely until I figure out what to do with it.





There isn't a lot of full sun in the back yard.  But "filtered sunlight" seems to be plentiful.  The tree's new home is in the rear of the back yard near the Buckeye tree .  .  .


« Last Edit: April 27, 2016, 01:04:15 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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