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Author Topic: Country Classic Cars, Staunton, Illinois, November & December 2006 . . .  (Read 25265 times)
Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #15 on: October 28, 2014, 12:48:58 PM »

The 1935-36 Auburn Type 851/852 Speedster is probably the most famous car that features "Boattail" styling.  Buick applied a modern twist to this idea to the third generation Riviera which debuted in 1971.  The long hood, short deck design philosophy now featured a flowing "Vee" that extended to the rear bumper.  While it's beautiful to look at, the huge rear window allows the interior to bake on a sunny afternoon.  The smallish trunk opening also limits functionality.





This 1973 model is one of 3,933 produced that year with the optional "GS Handling Package," and was listed for $7,950.





The Premier was technically Lincoln's top-of-the-line car in 1957.  I say "technically" because the halo Mark II was a produced under the Continental brand specifically created for that car.  This car was described as an "older restoration." 





Judging by the rust on the trunk lid, I'm going to take that comment to mean "much older."





Asking price was $13,950.





This 1978 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz was another of my favorites on that day.





I remember drooling over this car on the dealer's website.  Asking price was $6,550, which sounded pretty cheap for the mileage.  The listing said the car showed, "19,xxx miles," which is very different from saying it has "original" miles.  Seeing the car in person made me think a little more about this. 





Looking at the obvious paint issues, it's easy to say that the 19,xxx miles listed represents what is shown on the 5-digit odometer.  But the actual number is probably 119,xxx.





However, the underhood area was really, really clean, (aside from the dust).  If you showed me a picture of just that, I could easily believe 19k "original" miles.





The interior could go either way.  While the passenger's seat looked like new, the driver's seat showed some wear.  And the white tape on the driver's door panel didn't do the car any favors.





If I saw this car today, I'd own it.  But back then, I needed to have a "one-car-fits-all" vehicle with daily driver capability being part of that equation.
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« Reply #16 on: October 28, 2014, 01:34:08 PM »

Speaking of cars that I would own in a heartbeat .  .  .





.  .  . This 1955 Packard 400 2-door was also one of my favorites on that day.  Technically, the name of the car is "The Four Hundred," and is one of 7,206 produced that year.  Asking price was $12,850 for the 58k mile car.





This is a 1975 Buick Riviera with 27k original miles.  The "Showroom Quality" description definitely applies.





Power comes from Buick's 455 CID V-8 that made only 205 hp, but a very impressive 345 ft-lbs of torque at a really low 2,000 rpm.  Unfortunately, the almost 4,700 curb weight put a damper on acceleration.





The trophies on the floor lead me to believe that the car owner showed it on a regular basis.  Asking price was $10,950.





I remember seeing these cars as a kid and being fascinated with the extra brake/signal lights just below the rear window on the trunk lid.  Today, this "High Mounted Stop Lamp" or "Third Brake light" is required on all cars.  Back then, it was just cool.





This is the second of two 1965 Cadillacs on the lot. 





A few mods had been made to the car.  The "reverse chrome" wheels aren't my thing, but are period correct.  And it looks like someone spent a few bucks on the custom dual exhaust.  One of the two long chrome pipes can be seen below.  It's hard to see from the photo.  But the size of the car's trunk means that chrome pipe is probably two feet in length, and there is one on the other side.  That's a lot of pipe !





The interior was beautiful !  Notice the AM/FM "Wonderbar" radio.  FM radio was a relatively new option for cars at that time.  The "Wonderbar" was a primitive version of the "seek" function on a modern radio.  Asking price was $11,950.


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« Reply #17 on: October 29, 2014, 12:40:10 AM »

This 390 powered 1968 Ford Galaxie 500 XL fastback was listed for $8,350, which tells me that it must have been a lot nicer than I remember.  Either that or the badge behind the front fender said "428."





This is a 1970 Mercedes-Benz 250 sedan that looked to be really nice both inside and out.





It sure looked like a really nice car for the $4,350 asking price.





This 1968 Chrysler New Yorker is another car that fascinated me on that day.  The body may not have been the greatest.  But the interior was quite nice.  I remember looking the car over and coming to the conclusion that if I needed to by basic transportation really quick, this car would be worth the $2,150 asking price.





The S-Class Mercedes-Benz has always been well liked by the car buying public.  Build quality and longevity are well documented on these cars.  This 1979 450SEL needed some work, but didn't look too bad for $2,550.  This car had a 4.5L V-8 that made 190 hp.  The upgrade from that would be the 250 hp 6.9L V-8.  The "6.9" cars are very rare and quite expensive today.





This 1970 Lincoln Mark III looks like it had been sitting there for a while.





The rust on the front seen above was somewhat unusual and made me wonder what the undercarriage looked like.  It didn't look bad at all from the side.  But the asking price of $7,250 seemed quite high for this car.





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« Reply #18 on: October 29, 2014, 01:12:17 AM »

Full-sized muscle was all the rage in the early 1960s.  Before the Pontiac GTO arrived in 1964, (i.e. a large engine in a mid-sized car), the largest and most powerful engines were only available in the larger cars.  Ford's Galaxie, Ponitac's Grand Prix and Catalina, and Chrysler's 300 could all be had with more than 400 hp.  Buick's entry was called the Wildcat which was based on the Invicta line.  Buick emphasized the "Luxury Sport Coupe" aspect of the car rather than power and performance.  Motivation came courtesy of Buick's bulletproof 401 CID "Nailhead" V-8 that made 325 hp.





This particular car is a 1963 Wildcat 4-door sedan with 69k original miles.  The asking price was a very reasonable $3,950.  





For 1956, Ford created the "Continental" division specifically the Mark II.  This very expensive (almost $10k in 1956), hand-built Halo car was a masterpiece of design and engineering.  It was not, however, a good seller for obvious reasons.  Ford addressed this in 1958 with the Mark III.





The results were mixed.  The Mark III featured a $4,141 price reduction over the Mark II, which resulted in more than 12,000 being sold that year.  The bean counters were happy.





The car's styling may have been contemporary for the giant fins and chrome era of the late 1950s.  But compared to the rolling work of art it replaced, the Mark III was looked upon as "visually challenged."





The asking price for this 61k mile car was a reasonable $6,950.  The body showed some surface rust issues which may or may have not been a problem.  The interior was actually quite nice.


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« Reply #19 on: November 01, 2014, 10:14:33 PM »

With the Mark III pics above, my visit to Country Classic Cars had ended.  I was so impressed with the place that I made a return trip one month later over the Christmas Holiday 2006.  That additional month with my then new Canon S3-IS camera benefited me greatly.  I took a lot of the same shots on my return visit with much better results.  Those pics along with some of the stuff I didn't shoot on my first visit are detailed below .  .  .





Country Classic Cars reloaded .  .  .  
Staunton, Illinois
December 22, 2006





Somehow, I missed the welcome sign on my first visit.  I like this strategy.  





The details, like the writing on the windshield, are much more clear on the 35k mile 1964 Imperial.  The layer of dust is much clearer also.





This is a 1968 Ford Galaxie 500XL in a great color.  Asking price was $9,250.





The 1968 Cadillac Coupe de Ville came out much clearer this time.





The interior photo came out much better, although it's still not really crisp and clear.  However, the double exposed details are not there this time.





Now compare that to the photo from one month earlier.  





What would cause half the photo to be double exposed ?
« Last Edit: November 02, 2014, 03:52:24 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #20 on: November 01, 2014, 10:27:26 PM »

Here's a better picture of the 1966 Chrysler Newport convertible.





I made a conscious effort to try and keep the camera as still as possible.  That combined with playing with the camera's settings actually worked as seen on the interior photo below.





This is a much better photo of the 5k original mile 1987 Chevrolet Monte Carlo SS Aero Coupe.





It was very dusty, (as was every car in the building), but it was extremely clean otherwise.








The 1967 Chrysler 300 convertible pics came out much better this time.











I see a flat tire on the 1968 Chrysler 300 convertible.





This interior photo was worlds ahead of my previous effort.





I noticed this time that the trunk was pretty solid.  I would definitely own this car for $6,550.


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« Reply #21 on: November 01, 2014, 11:19:32 PM »

The 1978 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz Custom Classic remains one of my all-time favorites.  It doesn't reflect it on the windshield.  But since my last visit, the price had been reduced by $3,000 to $16,550.





This is one of the reasons why I love these cars so much  -  the wonderful seats !





I took a few detailed pics of the 1968 Mercury Monterey fastback only because I was actually thinking about buying it.





The body seemed pretty straight.





I love the fastback roof line !





The car was in great shape overall even though it had a few issues.  The headliner had been removed, and the dash cover seen below hid a bunch of cracks.  But the rest of it was pretty nice.





And then there's the engine.





I don't know what the 429 in the engine bay came out of.  But the 370 hp label suggests it may be from a 1970-71 429CJ Torino or Cyclone, or a 1971 Mustang.





The car had a/c.  But the belt was off which lead me to believe that the compressor may have been locked up.





The 5th digit in the VIN on Fords from this era identifies the engine.





The VIN breaks down as follows:
8 = Model year:  1968
Z = Assembly plant:  St. Louis, Missouri
47 = Body Serial code:  2-door hardtop with a bench seat.
Z = Engine:  390 CID V-8, 4bbl.
5 = Mercury Production sequence, (Ford used "1").
48947 = Consecutive unit number.


I hadn't yet discovered the "macro" setting on the camera.  So this closeup of the body data plate is kinda blurry.  The VIN is shown again.  The "63A" code is the Body Style code for a Mercury Monterey 2-door hardtop.  I am pretty sure the "6" shown indicates the exterior paint code, in this case Light Beige.  And the "HU" on the far left of the tag is the interior trim code which indicates Pastel Parchment Vinyl.





I thought the $5,950 asking price may have been a good deal, especially considering the 429CJ under the hood .  .  .
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« Reply #22 on: November 01, 2014, 11:55:54 PM »

This is a much better picture of the $4,950 1975 Cadillac Eldorado convertible.





The car was advertised as having "new paint."





I am a firm believer in the "you-get-what-you-pay-for" philosophy when applied to collectible cars.  The price suggests a possible can of worms may lurk beneath the new paint.  And the interior had some issues.  Taking the car out on a hot sunny day may not be advisable with the duct tape seat cover.  Regardless, I'd still own it for $4,950 !





This 1968 Ford Galaxie 500 4-door was listed for $6,850.  The "you-get-what-you-pay-for" thinking described above applies here as well.





This was a very original car in excellent shape.  I'm not a fan of the rear fender skirts though.





This 1968 Plymouth Fury III convertible is one of 4,483 produced that year.  Asking price was $11,350.





This 1951 Packard DeLuxe 4-door was another favorite.  





Well, any Packard will always be a favorite of mine.  





This car seemed pretty nice for $13,450, especially since it was advertised as "just restored."  Although I'm not a fan of painting the chrome rear bumper the same color as the roof.  





The "Ultramatic" emblem indicates Packard's automatic transmission which was introduced in 1949.  


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« Reply #23 on: November 02, 2014, 12:30:57 AM »

I'm partial to the Jaguar XJS convertible, for obvious reasons.  This car is a 1988 model with 81k original miles on the odometer.  I love the wire wheels !





This car wasn't perfect, but seemed like a good deal at $6,450.  I like the heated seats, which would have been an unusual option in 1988.





Unfortunately, a 1980s Jaguar XJS also has a Lucas electrical system (the Ford system wouldn't arrive until the mid-1990s), and those dreadful inboard mounted rear brake rotors, (10 hours to change according to a labor time guide).  Doing anything to the V-12 other than looking at it from a distance can quickly become an exercise in futility.  But it sure is purdy !  





In other words, I would be partial to this particular Jaguar until I had to fix something, regardless of how beautiful it looks on the outside.





The bumper bullets seen in the above photo belong to a nice 1955 Cadillac Series 62 4-door.  Asking price was $12,550.





Here are some better shots of the 1967 Chrysler Newport, one of my favorites.











The interior pics also turned out much better.  No more double exposed trim.





The interior was absolutely mint on this car !  





I'd definitely own that car for $6,650 .  .  .
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« Reply #24 on: November 02, 2014, 12:55:01 AM »

This rusty 1966 Ford Thunderbird was advertised as "original inside."  However, the driver's window being partially down didn't do the car any favors.  Asking price was $3,650.





This is a seldom seen 1959 Oldsmobile Dynamic 88.  Asking price for the 62k mile car was $4,350.





It looks like the car had been sitting in that same spot for a long time.





Here are a few more photos of the original numbers matching 1969 Oldsmobile 442 advertised for $5,950.  It may have been completely original, but it was quite rusty as well.








It looks like the car had been out in the elements for many years.  It was salvageable, but rough.





I got a better shot of the 1964 Chrysler 300 listed for $1,650.  





The interior didn't look as bad as the outside of the car.  It was rough but not too bad.  The odometer showed 84k miles.  





This is a 1968 Mercury Monterey convertible.  The windshield says $6,250, but it had been marked down to $4,850 on the website.





This is an extremely rare car !  Only 1,515 were produced that year.


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« Reply #25 on: November 02, 2014, 01:37:00 AM »

Even though I wasn't fond of them when I was growing up, I've become a big fan of the classic large American station wagon.  This 1966 Oldsmobile F85 wagon showed 71k miles and was listed for $6,250.





This is a 1974 Mercedes-Benz 280 Coupe.





The asking price on this 86k mile car was a reasonable $5,950.





The great color and the great condition of the interior made me notice this car.





I took some much clearer photos of the 1970 Ford Thunderbird.





The Fifth Generation Thunderbird wasn't as popular with buyers as other generations.  Around 37k Landau hardtop coupes were built making this car somewhat rare all things considered.








I found out the 1985 Oldsmobile 442 listed for $8,350 was actually a 32k original mile car.  





More station wagon goodness !





This is a 1965 Buick Sport Wagon.  The Sport Wagon was V-8 powered, (either 210 or 250 hp), and could be had with a manual transmission.  The "355 Wildcat engine" designated the 250 hp motor that had 355 ft-lbs of torque, hence the name.  A unique feature of the Sport Wagon was the "Skyroof," which was a series of 4 glass panels built into the raised section of the car's roof.  Asking price was $6,550.


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« Reply #26 on: November 02, 2014, 01:01:57 AM »

This is a 1974 Ford LTD Landau advertised as having 38k original miles.  





And it sure looked like a 38k original mile car both inside and out.  The 351 CID V-8 featured a 2-bbl carburetor and made a rather unimpressive 162 hp, but a very impressive 278 ft-lbs of torque at a mere 2,000 rpm.





But the best thing about this car was the $4,950 asking price.  This is another one of those cars I would own if I needed basic transportation and didn't have a lot of cash.





This is a better picture of the 20k original mile 1965 Cadillac Sedan de Ville.





The bulletproof 429 CID V-8 made 340 hp and a whopping 480 ft-lbs of torque at 3,000 rpm.





This car was in mint condition inside and out.








This 1965 Pontiac Bonneville was advertised as having new paint.  It's hard to tell from the pictures.  But the car is bright yellow.





I can believe the new paint story because the driver's outside mirror along with a few small pieces of trim had not yet been re-installed.





Asking price on the 61k mile car was $6,450.


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« Reply #27 on: November 02, 2014, 01:40:43 AM »

This 1950 Pontiac Chieftain convertible was beautiful !  Asking price was $22,850.





This 1957 Chevy Bel Air had been completely restored to original condition.





Asking price was a lofty $34,850.





Chevrolet introduced the Chevelle for the 1964 model year.  This car had 62k miles on the odometer and was listed for $13,450.  I love the originality right down to the plain-Jane hubcaps.  How many of us remember Repo Man ?





Plymouth produced a little over 11,000 Barracudas in its final year of 1974.  The first thing that I noticed about this car was a slight graphics discrepancy.  Neither the 383 CID V-8 nor the "hockey strip" were available in 1974.  





But what was even stranger was the fact that the "383" decals were different.  The number on the passenger side shown above was larger than that on the driver's side shown below.  Not sure what happened here other than the passenger side number looked correct.  The asking price was $21,950.





Here are two different takes on the classic Ford Thunderbird.  This car is a restored 1956 model that was listed for $32,950.





Aside from a few modern upgrades from stock that were installed during the rebuild, the original 292/312 CID V-8 was pretty much just as it was when Ford installed it 50 years earlier.





Next to that car was a nowhere near stock 1955 Thunderbird.





The stock 292 CID V-8 had been replaced with a modern fuel injected 5.0L HO V-8.  I really liked the way the swap was done  -  very professional looking.  Asking price on this car was $25,950.  If you are like me and love to drive a classic, this would be a good way to do it.


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« Reply #28 on: November 02, 2014, 02:34:09 AM »

This 1965 Ford Thunderbird was quite nice.  Asking price was $9,650.





T-Birds from the mid-1960s featured the "Swing Away" steering column.  With the shift lever in park, the whole steering column could be slid inboard allowing for easier ingress/egress.  





While it may look like a Grand National, this is actually a black 1984 Buick Regal T-Type.  A turbo Regal could be had in three variations that year:  T-Type (2,238 produced), Grand National (2,000 produced), and RPO WH1 "Designer Series" T-Type (1,163 produced), for a total of 5,401 cars.  That makes this car quite rare.





All were the same car mechanically having the famous 3.8L Turbo V-6 that made 200 hp in 1984.  In an era when the industry was just beginning to emerge from the dark ages of the 1970s, this was an impressive number, and good for a high 15 second quarter mile.





The car's good looks and ample power, unfortunately, didn't transfer to the inside of the car.  My Complete Book of Collectible Cars describes the GN as, "Darth Vader outside, Rosanne Barr inside."  Asking price on this 47k original mile car was $9,450.





This is a 1979 Pontiac Trans Am.  The "T/A 6.6" decal on the hood scoop should indicate that this car has the 220 hp 400 CID Pontiac V-8 and 4-speed manual transmission.  Cars that had "6.6 LITRE" on the hood scoop came with a 185 hp 403 CID Oldsmobile V-8 and automatic transmission.  If you look closely at the front of the engine, you can see the oil fill tube which identifies the 403/auto combination.  Either way, this was a really nice car with 51k miles.  Asking price was $13,850.  


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« Reply #29 on: November 02, 2014, 03:24:19 PM »

This is another 1964 Pontiac Grand Prix.





The Grand Prix was billed as a hot rod, (as opposed to the Buick Wildcat which emphasized the Luxury Sport aspect).  Plenty of options were available to ensure rapid progress of forward motion.  The base engine was a 389 CID V-8 that made 303 hp (4bbl carb.).  Economically minded consumers could opt for the 230 hp version (2bbl carb).  Upgrades included a "Tri-Power" 330 hp version, (3-2bbl carbs).  The 421 CID V-8 was optional in 320 hp (4bbl carb.), 353 hp (3-2bbl carbs), and "HO" 370 hp (3-2bbl carbs) versions.  And all of the above could be paired with a manual transmission.  I didn't see "421" badging on this car which means it probably had one the 389s.  





Asking price on this 389/auto car was $11,750.





This is a 1962 Ford Galaxie 500.  It may say "Fairlane" on the windshield.  But it's definitely a Galaxie 500.





The "original interior" description, aside from needing a few minor cosmetics, was very accurate.  





This is a much better set of photos of the beautiful 74k mile 1961 Cadillac Series 62 Coupe that was listed for $10,950.








I love the body lines !





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