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Author Topic: Life on the farm  (Read 5309 times)
Axe
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« on: April 06, 2014, 05:22:19 PM »

 Some of you may know and some may not but just under 2 yrs  ago I lost my car, house, and because we had to relocate so far away my career. It all came down to letting my daughter , her boyfriend
, and their daughter live with us for free. My granddaughter tested positive for lead in her blood and the moron from the county health dept automatically decided it was caused by our house. After fighting with them for over a year and proving that it was not the house and that they didn't even know the Ohio EPA laws we were still served with a notice that the residence was uninhabitable.

So after me not being able to empty my shed fast enough the bank gave all my car parts to the local heroin addicts. I had been collecting parts for over 30 years, Chevy 454, 396, numerous 4 bolt 350's, muncie 252, and the list goes on. An 8'x 24' shed with shelves built down both sides, full to the top.

« Last Edit: April 06, 2014, 05:27:09 PM by Axe » Logged
Axe
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« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2014, 05:37:09 PM »

Our only option at the time was to take over my parent's farm. We knew it needed a lot of work but had no idea how bad iit had gotten. I only have a few crappy cell phone pics at the moment, but will post better ones as I get them. For now...

This is the house from the front view.

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Axe
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« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2014, 05:44:06 PM »

This is the rear view from back near the garden area.

« Last Edit: April 06, 2014, 05:49:27 PM by Axe » Logged
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« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2014, 05:59:48 PM »

Here's the barn with the firepit in the barnlot. There was a huge walnut tree there originally and when we were younger we had a tire swing hanging in it using an old "Gorilla High Speed" tire we found here. After burning out the stump last year I decided to leave the firepit there.

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Axe
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« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2014, 06:05:21 PM »

Here's a similar pic I took the same day Todd was posting pics of his spring flowers.

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Axe
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« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2014, 06:15:38 PM »

If the roofline looks bad on the barn it's for a good reason. Here's a pic of the back side. This was taken last fall and it's much worse now after a harsh winter.


« Last Edit: April 06, 2014, 08:00:51 PM by Axe » Logged
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« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2014, 06:31:06 PM »

Some of the good things about this place are the view and the privacy. This one is looking up the road to the west. Hidden in the clump of trees on the right side is our nearest neighbor's house in that direction.

« Last Edit: April 06, 2014, 06:45:37 PM by Axe » Logged
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« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2014, 06:48:46 PM »

Here's view looking South East

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« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2014, 06:52:06 PM »

This is the view from the front porch looking straight North.

« Last Edit: April 06, 2014, 06:54:42 PM by Axe » Logged
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« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2014, 06:58:09 PM »

This is the one that makes it all worth it.

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Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2014, 11:17:38 PM »

That looks like a nice home on a great piece of property.  The outside appearance definitely doesn't match some of the comments you have made previously regarding its condition.  And the countryside is beautiful ! 







I love the wide-open space and the mid-west sunsets ! 







Missouri sunsets were beautiful like that.  But, all that white crap is an entirely different matter !



Here's a similar pic I took the same day Todd was posting pics of his spring flowers.





Great pics Axe !  Keep 'em coming .  .  .
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« Reply #11 on: April 07, 2014, 12:48:10 PM »

Thanks Todd! We love a lot of things about it but hadn't spent much time here in recent years. My parents moved here full time when dad retired in 91-92. That's when he tore off all the old stucco and insulated the walls, then covered it with plywood , more insulation, and vinyl siding. He also replaced most of the windows over the next couple of years.

The problems now are that the structural wood has been damp for 50 years and it's starting to break. The floor joists were replaced in the dining room about 30 years ago but the sub-floor is breaking up. There is one hole where a piece of furniture broke through. Not that big of a deal but now the floor joists are all breaking under the kitchen too. You can reach up from the basement and break off pieces of them and the sub-floor with your hand. There are 4 in a row that are completely broken  letting the kitchen floor sag. They can also be replaced but it's a wood frame house and there's no telling how much more damage has been done.

The well water is contaminated to the point that we only use it for flushing the toilet. Even then the upstairs plumbing is so clogged that we have to fill gallon jugs in the kitchen sink and carry them upstairs to fill the toilet tank. Again things that can be fixed. I can get a new well drilled for about $5K and can then replace all the interior plumbing by myself. The problem is that we don't know if it's just the well or if all the ground water in contaminated. It will cost us the new well just to find out.

My dad just had a large tumor removed from inside his bladder that we also think came from using this water for 40 yrs. We normally go get a shower at my parent's new house or drive 100 mi to my wife's mom's house. A couple of months ago we broke down and took baths here a couple of times. A few weeks later my wife developed a nasty bladder infection that sent her to the hospital. Maybe related, maybe not. I just no that she's suffering through weeks of pain and medication that gives her nausea, and I have a $3700 hospital bill to pay with no insurance.

This winter was hard on the entire Midwest. What made it bad for us is that with the foundation leaking so bad the basement is again, always wet. The main heat source here is a wood burning stove in the kitchen. The stove that's here is over 20 yrs old and has more than served it's purpose. It now has so many leaks that if you try to choke it down enough to get decent heat from i smoke pours out of every crevis and the whole house packs down before you know it. Having been a career firefighter for almost 25 yrs my spidey senses tell me that's not a good thing. We bought a wood burning blast furnace a few months ago thinking it would work in the kitchen to replace the existing stove this winter, then install gu
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« Reply #12 on: April 07, 2014, 01:05:40 PM »

(Cont...)

install gutters this year and start digging and sealing around the foundation That's when I found how bad the floor joists were. The new furnace would have fallen through to the basement once we loaded it up with wood. It weighs about 700 lbs by itself by the time you get the firebrick and everything in it. So that's sitting unused, just like the new bath tub and pedestal sink.

This was a very nice place when it was built in 1924, but after 50 yrs of neglect I don't know if it's worth the time and money to save it. Even the barn is well beyond repair. That was a nice 36'x 60' wood beam barn that's about 30' tall. It's all pinned together with wooden pegs.
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« Reply #13 on: April 07, 2014, 01:16:52 PM »

Those are just some of the main problems. I didn't even get into the wiring nightmares. At one point in the 80's the house was vacant for some time and one of the nice neighbors helped themselves to all the copper they could cut out. Dad ran temporary wiring to get the house functional again but it hanging all over the basement. Illegal splicing and low hanging wires don't mix well with old wood and standing in 3" of water on the floor.

Add to all that a climate where the only thing that exists for miles around are grain fields, commercial pig farms,  and the occasional turkey house which actually smell worse than the pig farms.

We are so beat up and in so much pain here that after being here almost 2 yrs we can't see spending what little money and energy we have left trying to salvage this place... no matter how much we love it.
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Axe
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« Reply #14 on: April 07, 2014, 01:52:22 PM »

This isn't even a rant. Just trying to explain some of why we don't think we can stay here. There are a hundred more things like how much stuff my mom still has here. We have taken much more than should be in her new house over to her. Even after condensing things several times there are still 3 rooms plus the full sized attic full of her stuff. We have an entire 24' U-haul truck full of items getting ruined in the barn still because there isn't room for it inside the house. My parents were living under these conditions for years basically using 2 out of the 10 rooms here. We feel like we did a good thing by getting them out of here. We just don't want to live like this for the rest  our lives.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2014, 02:58:39 PM by Axe » Logged
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