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Author Topic: Spring 2014 is here already . . .  (Read 9457 times)
Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #30 on: July 20, 2014, 01:31:54 PM »

continued .  .  .
Part 4 of 5
July 5 - 6, 2014





The two $1 grass plants from the clearance rack at Lowe's are doing well.  





Variegated Liriope ornamental grass likes shade, which makes it ideal for the back yard.  I should probably plant a bunch of it back here.





The two remaining Pampas Grass plants are going out front eventually.  They're surviving in this location but not really "growing," especially compared to what is occurring out front.  I'll make room for them out in the sun.





This side of the back yard is pretty bare, which is fine.  A couple of passes with the lawn mower over the season is all that is needed to keep the area neat.  





The three trees I planted here all call for part shade or "filtered" sunlight.








I'm not sure what the deal is with Japanese Maple trees.  But the examples at Lowe's are really expensive.  This makes my $40 purchase from the UGA Horticulture Plant Sale that much better.





I discovered a volunteer pine tree growing beside my front steps recently and made a home for it on the other side of the back yard in among the other pine trees.





And I know, I need to make a few passes with the mower over here.  That's up next .  .  .


« Last Edit: July 20, 2014, 02:38:48 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #31 on: July 20, 2014, 02:34:55 PM »

continued .  .  .
Part 5 of 5
July 5 - 6, 2014





Ah !  That's better .  .  .





The mowing was also accompanied by a pass with the hedge clippers, and the removal of one straggler Nandina plant.





I also removed a large shrub-like plant that seemed to be growing from the stump of an old tree that had long since been cut down.  I'm not sure what it was.  But it had been there since I moved in and was starting to look a little thin.  It's the straggly looking thing in the photo below.  Over the years, it grew taller, but not "fuller," if that makes any sense.  In other words, it became a taller version of what you see below.


July 23, 2009



It used to sit in between two trees on the right side of the photo below.  What's left of the stump can be seen in the grass if you look carefully.





Keen eyes will also notice a couple of giant weeds growing in front of the pine trees.  Several of them have appeared over the last year or so.





I am told that this is called a "Pokeweed," which I'm not familiar with.  It's used to make Poke Salad, which I've also never heard of. I've got several of these scattered about.  Poke Salad is, apparently, a popular southern dish.  The best part of this is that the plant is very toxic if not properly prepared.  Awesome !  Sounds like a great party snack for those guests you're not particularly fond of.





All I know is that they grow with a vengeance and make cool looking flowers.  Eventually, I'll move them all together in one location.





I mowed over all the weeds so as to give my transplanted pine tree from above a little more room.  





And all is well.  It's not much, but it's my own little oasis .  .  .


« Last Edit: July 20, 2014, 02:39:21 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #32 on: July 20, 2014, 03:00:27 PM »

Awesome colors .  .  .
July 17, 2014





This is, apparently, the Crape Myrtle blooming season.  Mine is doing just that.





Last year and earlier this year, I decided to hack a few straggling branches off of mine.  My guess is that this has spurred a bunch of growth.








I need to do that more often .  .  .


« Last Edit: July 20, 2014, 03:10:58 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #33 on: July 21, 2014, 11:58:41 PM »

My Crepe Myrtles aren't blooming very much this year like normal and I've noticed others in the area aren't either. My snowball bush didn't bloom much this year either, however both have exploded with foliage and size despite being cut way back this spring, just not much in the way of blooms. Don't know what is up with that, but the crepe myrtles are starting to get more in the last week or so, just not like they usually are by now.
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Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #34 on: September 01, 2014, 03:48:40 PM »

Epilogue .  .  .
Part 1 of 4
August 23-24, 2014





A dead pine tree has been standing at the back corner of my yard ever since I moved in.  I think it's actually my neighbor's tree.  But it's close enough to the property line that neither of us really knows for sure.  It's been dead for a while, and the very top of it has already broken off.





I was chatting with my neighbor earlier this year.  "That tree doesn't look long for this world," was her comment to me.  Her worry was that it would fall on top of her garden, (which is beautiful, by the way).  While not a huge tree, it's tall enough to have the potential to cause a bunch of damage.  She asked me if I would mind if she would drop it into my yard.  I don't have anything in that area to worry about, and offered to help bring it down when that day arrived.  Mother Nature must have been listening to our conversation and decided to handle this problem herself.





An overnight thunderstorm that contained a little more wind than usual blew it over.  This tree must have been dead for a long while.  It fell more than 45 degrees.  But rather than break the relatively small tree it hit, it snapped in the middle.





I give Mother Nature points for accuracy.  She dropped it in a great spot.








Leaf & Limb Collection is scheduled for my neighborhood next week.  This means it was time for me to break out the chain saw, hack up the deceased, and double the size of my pile.


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Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #35 on: September 01, 2014, 04:12:04 PM »

continued .  .  .
Part 2 of 4
August 23-24, 2014





I took a walk around my yard to see what I could see.  I've made a lot of changes this year.  And with the end of summer not that far away, it's time to assess how good they were.  The mailbox area has done well since its inception last year.  The Bridal Wreath Spirea continues to grow larger, which may or may not become an issue in the future. 





Moving the Pampas Grass out front was a great decision.  These plants love sunlight, which is plentiful in the front yard.  It responded to its relocation by growing more in a few months than it had in all of the previous year.





This success motivated me to move two more Pampas Grass plants from the back yard out to this area.  Eventually, the border of my "mailbox area" will be expanded to include all three Pampas Grass plants.  But this is still a few years away.





I'll find out in the spring whether or not moving all the bulbs out front was a good decision.  I'm very optimistic, however.  They seem to be growing very well.  I really hope they flower !





The Flowering Dogwood from the UGA Hort. Club Plantapalooza sale this spring seems to be doing ok.  But the leaves seem to be wilted.





The Star Magnolia doesn't look like it's changed at all.  But as long as it is green and growing, I'm happy.


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Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #36 on: September 01, 2014, 04:27:19 PM »

continued .  .  .
Part 3 of 4
August 23-24, 2014





So far so good for my design experiments.  The hardest part of this adventure is keeping the weeds at bay.  But I've given it my best shot.  The trees, themselves, are doing great !





I need to keep Lee's advice in mind and keep a close eye on the Snowball bush and Small Anise tree.  Both have already grown a bunch since I planted them in April.  





The Frostproof Gardenia is doing well, and should work out well from a size standpoint.





I found out why half of my Azaleas didn't flower this past spring.  Azaleas flower from the previous year's growth.  This means when idiot me decided to give them a trim last fall, I cut a majority of the "previous year's growth" off, hence the lack of color.  This is why Azaleas should be cut back not too long after blooming in the spring.  And cut them back, I certainly did !





I think this was a good decision because of all the new growth that occurred lower within the shrub.  





I did the same thing with the rest of the line.  





After hacking everything back in the late spring, I left them alone for the rest of the summer.


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Oldcarsarecool
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A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


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« Reply #37 on: September 01, 2014, 04:43:55 PM »

continued .  .  .
Part 4 of 4
August 23-24, 2014





But I think I am most pleased with the back yard.  For whatever reason, the "neat and orderly" look really appeals to me this year. 





I'm extremely happy that the Green European Fan Palm Tree survived last year's winter.  It may not be growing much, but it's growing.  How much it grows will determine if I have to move it or not.  I'll cross that bridge when I come to it.





The Flowering Dogwood on the left and the Seiryu Japanese Maple in the center of the photo below are doing well.  The Buckeye tree on the far right has me a little concerned.  It doesn't seem to be doing as well as it should.  Some additional research is in order.





I'm wondering if the shrub in between the two trees on the far left of the photo below is starting to go the same way as the one I removed few weeks ago.  It's starting to look a little thin.  Time will tell if I have to break out the sawzall again.





But all is well otherwise.  I'm happy with the changes I've made over the last 6 months, and am looking forward to what appears in the spring. 





I want to thank everyone for reading, and invite you to tune in next spring to see what happens .  .  .
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