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Author Topic: Spring 2014 is here already . . .  (Read 9458 times)
Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #15 on: May 12, 2014, 12:29:43 AM »

Another plant sale ?  Awesome .  .  .
April 12 - 13, 2014





I don't know how often the UGA Horticulture Club holds a plant sale.  Apparently, sales are not limited to just the spring Plantapalooza event from last weekend, (a massive spring plant sale held by the State Botanical Garden of Georgia, the UGA Horticulture Club, and the UGA Trial Gardens).  Thursday afternoon, I began to see the tables, tent, and truckloads of plants once again being assembled across the parking lot. 





As far as I know, there is no published schedule.  So I best take advantage of it when I can.  The hardest part of that is getting my lazy rear end out of bed on a Saturday morning.  But once I do, the results are quite rewarding, even if the credit card does take a beating.





First order of business  -  I've got one of these in my side yard by the driveway.  What is it ?  I think the little flowers look nice.





I asked a group of grad students at the tent if anyone could identify it.  The general consensus is that I have an Elaeagnus Umbellataon, which is commonly known as a Japanese Silverberry or Spreading Oleaster.  And yes, it is considered "invasive," which explains why it grows so well in my yard.  "It'll get HUGE" was one of the grad student's comments, indicating that it makes a great privacy fence.  This would actually be quite welcome considering where it sits.  Cool .  .  .





The Jaguar plant hauler got another workout.  Sharing space with me on trip number one were an Aesculus Pavia "Red Buckeye" tree and a Viburnum Macrocephalum "Chinese Snowball" bush.





The passenger seat was occupied by a Cornus Florida "Dogwood Cherokee Princess" tree for trip number two.





An Illicium Parviflorum "Small Anise" tree, a Blushing Knock Out Rose bush, and a Gardenia Augusta "Frostproof Gardenia" shared space in the trunk.





My friend, Heather, saw me having all this fun and wanted to check the sale out for herself.  She has a truck and just happened to have some room available to haul a Rhododendron Yedoense "Korean Azalea" bush and a Callistemon Rigidus "Woodlander's Hardy Bottlebrush" shrub back to my house, thus giving the Jag a break for trip number three. 





Both of these will go next to each other along the driveway.  The Azalea will go in line with the others as shown in the photo above.  I'll put the Bottlebrush next to the Azalea.





I'm going to pay more attention to the directions this year.  If the tag on the plant says "full sun," I've got to put it where it gets full sun which, in my yard, means somewhere out front.  The Azalea and Bottlebrush both like "full to part-sun" meaning they should be happy beside the driveway. 





The Red Buckeye likes "filtered sunlight," which just happens to be what I have in the back yard.





It should be happy back there.





Just about everything else I bought likes a sunny environment.  The Blushing Knock Out Rose bush likes full sun, and should be happy at the corner of the driveway.





The Small Anise tree, .  .  .





.  .  . Chinese Snowball, and Frostproof Gardenia are going to replace a few dying shrubs against the front of the house.





I already have a Dogwood tree in the front yard.  After hacking off a couple of limbs last year, it's blooming with a vengeance this year. 





The flowers on this tree are pink. 





I saw Dogwood with pink flowers at the sale today labeled as a "Cherokee Brave."  I don't know if this is what I have, but the colors are identical.  The tree I bought today is called a "Cherokee Princess."





It produces white flowers, and will look great next to the pink flowers of the other Dogwood.  They look identical except that this one is white.





My goal is to have a lot of color in my yard in the future.  As long as I follow directions, the yard should look a little different in a few years.





So let's start at the street and work our way back .  .  .





Dig, plant, repeat .  .  .
I decided to put the Dogwood Cherokee Princess out front near the Dogwood Cherokee Brave that I currently have (at least, I think that's what I have).





The professor I spoke at Plantapalooza suggested that I dig "wide" instead of "deep," meaning I shouldn't have to break out the bucket wheel excavator to dig downward through the Georgia red clay that is my yard.  He suggested that two or three times the width of the pot that I am planting should be fine. 





Mix in some "garden soil" from Lowe's and put the plant in the ground.





Regular readers may remember the story of my mailbox area from last year.  When I first moved into this house in 2009, the main feature of my mailbox area decor was one large neglected, but otherwise reasonably nice shrub.  I began to notice with each passing year it seemed to be dying in parts.  There wasn't a whole lot left of it when I finally had to put it out of its misery in March 2013.


March 17, 2013



I began to notice something similar with three of the small shrubs that sit against the front of the house.  What used to be a nicely sized and shaped shrub of some kind now looks like a cluster of sticks.





If my mailbox area experience from last year is any kind of indication, I should be able to break the dead pieces off with very little effort.  Today was better in the sense that giving a good tug at the base of the shrub brought the whole thing out of the ground.  A few cycles with the shovel made quick work of any remaining pieces of the stumps and roots.





This is how Todd's planting logic works.  In the area shown below starting at the left, I've got a Ruby Loropetalum, an Eleanor Taber Indian Hawthorne (which flowers in pink), a yellow rose bush, and the green Mr. Goldstrike.   


 


The white Frostproof Gardenia will look good here.





The white Chinese Snowball bush and Small Anise tree (which flowers in yellow), will produce the same effect on the other side in between the green Mr. Goldstrike and red Ruby Loropetalum. 





I'll have to keep an eye on the Small Anise tree and Chinese Snowball, as both can get pretty big if left to their own devices.  But for now, all is well.





I decided to put the Blushing Knock Out Rose bush next to the Crape Myrtle.  That area in between the ornamental grass at the base of the Crape Myrtle and the driveway has always looked like something needed to be planted there, but I never knew what, exactly.





I figured a rose bush would be a nice addition.





I think it takes up the gap quite well. 





The Korean Azalea will go in line next to the other Azaleas along the driveway.





Todd's Color Logic also applies in this case.





Starting at the left, I've got red and white, followed by dark red, then red, another red, the new Delaware Valley white, then another red.





The lavender shade of the Korean Azalea should look great in line, especially after it gets a little bigger.





The Woodlander's Hardy Bottlebrush will go in line next to the Azaleas, for no real reason other than there is plenty of room for it.





This area is right in the path of the runoff from my next door neighbor’s rain spout. 





I figure the Azalea and Bottlebrush can take advantage of this.





I’m happy with this area.





I found these two little guys on the    -    and there’s that word again    -    “Clearance” rack during one of my trips to Lowe’s for more bags of Garden Soil.  I decided to spend the $1 each and see what happens.





These are Variegated Liriope ornamental grass plants and like part shade.  I figured the area next to the sidewalk by the Yoshino Cherry tree looked like a great place to put them.





Now onward to the back yard.





I haven’t done anything back here only because I don’t quite know what to do.  The Red Buckeye tree likes “filtered sunlight,” which describes the back yard perfectly.





The small size means I’ll have to stake this tree for a while.  But it should be fine.





So far so good with the Seiryu Japanese Maple tree as well. 





I’ll address the back yard at some point during my tenure at this place, although I’m not in any hurry.  I bought these two trees only because they like filtered sunlight.





We’ll see what happens over the years .  .  .


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« Reply #16 on: May 12, 2014, 01:59:23 AM »

Looks way too ambitious for me.

Seriously it looks like a lot of work but that's what it takes to have such a beautiful yard. I hope your new plants all do well. We spent the weekend in Cincy for various family reasons but should head home sometime tomorrow. I still have a lot of grass to mow when we get there.
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« Reply #17 on: May 15, 2014, 11:02:45 PM »

Thanks Axe !  I appreciate it .  .  .
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« Reply #18 on: May 16, 2014, 12:28:41 AM »

A nice day for picture-taking .  .  .
April 21, 2014





Everything always seems to look better on a bright sunny day for whatever reason.  The bright sunshine made today seem like a great day to take a few pics before heading to work.


The Bridal Wreath Spirea at mailbox is doing really well.





I'm really pleased at how this area turned out.





Three weeks ago, the Sweet Gum tree in the front yard had begun to wake up, but was still pretty bare.  


March 31, 2014



Today is a much different story.





Everything is waking up for the season.  The October Glory Maple tree.





The Dogwood is now turning green after a beautiful couple of weeks while in bloom.





The front yard will look very different in a few years.  But it's a work in progress for now.  





The Frostproof Gardenia I planted in between the rose bush and the Mr. Goldstrike Japanese Aucuba looks pretty small now.  But it has the potential to reach 3 - 4 feet tall and 3 - 4 feet in diameter which will work well for that space.





The Chinese Snowball and Small Anise Tree have the potential to get pretty large, (especially the Chinese Snowball at more than 10 feet tall).  Both can be pruned and shaped as needed, which should work out well for me.





I need to get some mulch to put at the base of the new Sky Pencil Holly shrubs I just planted.





The Azalea line grew a little differently this year, meaning not everything bloomed.





The two next to the street bloomed as usual.  





What impresses me most about these photos is that I have blooms and new growth at the base of the plant.  My goal over the last several years has been to reduce its giant size, and I've been trying to follow my neighbor's advice  -  prune it at the top only.  "Cut the shoulders" is how he put it.  





The dark red Azalea is doing very well.





Now here's the confusing part:  The next Azalea in line, while green and growing very well, did not bloom this season.





The next Azalea bloomed in sections, which was really strange.





The new Delaware Valley White Azalea looks great !





But the Azalea next to it didn't bloom either.





The new Korean Azalea is going to look great with its lavender color.  





The new Bottlebrush bush seems to be doing well.





And so far, so good for the new rose bush.  





I've mentioned before that the Japanese Boxwood shrubs I planted in the back yard two years ago are doing well, but don't seem to be growing real fast.  It seems like they are doing much better now.  





For the second year in a row, none of the bulbs I planted bloomed.  They grew very well, but never flowered.  My guess is that there is just not enough sun in that location.  While it would be nice to have a bunch of nice flowers in that area, I don't think it will happen with those bulbs.  So they're all going to get moved probably out front somewhere.





The filtered sunlight seems to be perfect for both the new Seiryu Japanese Maple tree .  .  .





.  .  . and the Red Buckeye tree.  





And even the weeds are flowering !


« Last Edit: August 24, 2014, 03:58:12 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #19 on: June 02, 2014, 12:13:21 AM »

Experimenting with design .  .  .
April 26-27, 2014





I've always admired creativity and artistic ability.  I have neither.  The tattoo artist who can translate an image onto your skin or the interior designer who can look at an empty room and mentally place furniture and accessories get much respect from me.  This kind of mental processing is just not part of my personality for whatever reason. 

This presents a challenge because I want to "do stuff" in my yard.  The advice often given to people like me is to look at pictures.  When you see something you like, try and recreate it.  Everything I've done so far in the yard follows this same line of thinking, although not from any single specific source.  Rather than try and make an exact copy of something I like, I try and make the general concept fit my situation and mix and match as necessary.  The concept for today involves a couple more trips to Lowe's followed by lots of digging.





I'm going to try translate something I saw in print somewhere to my yard.  My shopping list includes a bunch of small Blue Dart Rush grass plants, some Happy Returns Daylilies, and a couple of Tiny Dessert Asiatic lilies. 





The Asiatic Lilies are going to go in the pots on my front porch. 





I'm not sure what was there previously.  But with each passing year, it seemed to produce more dead sticks than anything else.  These lilies are perennials and should come back each year.





I'm not sure where my design inspiration comes from exactly.  But I decided to try surrounding my new trees with smaller ornamental plants.  I can do this now while the trees are small.  I think it will look ok when I'm done.





I'm going to surround the October Glory Maple tree with the Happy Returns Daylilies.





I picked a distance that "looked ok" and started removing the weeds in a circle around the tree.  The diameter of the circle ended up being around 7 feet.





The tag on the daylilies gives a recommended spacing of 12" - 24". 





It may not be exact.  But I figured 10 plants would work fine.





The nice thing about these plants is that I don't need to dig too far down into my dirt track racing surface yard. 





These lilies will (hopefully) produce yellow flowers.  The maple tree doesn't flower.  I think the contrast will look nice.





The Cleveland Select Flowering Pear tree was next. 





This tree flowers white each spring.  I figured a nice contrast to this would be an ornamental grass.  I noticed something while digging my 7 feet diameter circle.





The spacing on the Blue Dart Rush grass is listed as 8" - 10".  I bought 10 plants, but I will definitely need more.  I'm glad Lowe's is less than 2 miles away.





I bought 4 more Blue Dart Rush grass plants.  For surrounding the palm tree, I decided to try some Creeping Phlox.  There was lots of room in the trunk for mulch as well.





Fourteen Blue Dart Rush grass plants works just fine around the pear tree.





Two down, one to go.








The palm tree is going to get surrounded by Creeping Phlox, 4 Scarlet Red and 4 Emerald Blue for a total of 8 plants. 





Removing the weeds is actually a lot harder than it seems.  I don't know what makes up my front yard.  But it's rooted pretty extensively and not very cooperative.





Creeping Phlox can grow to 12" wide. 





Eight plants should look fine and take up the space nicely.





I need to get more mulch so I can fill the area around the palm tree also.  But you get the idea .  .  .


« Last Edit: June 02, 2014, 12:18:45 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #20 on: June 09, 2014, 12:56:34 AM »

Tackling another project .  .  .
May 3 - 4, 2014





My design experiment from the last entry only needed some mulch to be completely finished.  I put down what I had, which I realized was just enough for what I did around the maple and pear trees, but not enough for around the palm tree.  Lowe's was happy to accommodate today's request. 





And I'm happy with the way everything looks.





Especially the new rose bush !








I planted it three weeks ago.  Judging by how fast it seemed to respond, I think it's happy.








Now all I have to do is figure out how to keep the bugs off of it. 





The new Star Magnolia and Dogwood Cherokee Princess are doing well.  I added some mulch around the base of these trees as well.





I mentioned at the beginning of this season that I didn't have a whole lot of confidence in my palm trees from last year.  I have three in the back yard.  The larger Silver European Fan Palm tree I planted outside of my kitchen window is still green, but noticeably smaller and contains a bunch of what I'll call dead branches.  The smaller Pindo Palm tree I planted directly behind the patio was green and actually increasing in size until the winter freeze.  It withered and turned brown soon after which made me wonder if it will survive.  Now, I think I have my answer.





I'm going to call this a "no."  The entire center of the plant came loose with one very slight tug on one of the branches.





But not all is lost.  I planted six Pampas Grass plants last year.  I moved two out front, one of which didn't survive.  Three of the four plants remaining in the back yard seem to be recovering !  It may be a slow recovery, but it's a recovery nonetheless.  I'll take it.





Today's adventure began with another trip to Lowe's for more mulch.





I've got another long-standing project to tackle today.  I planted a bunch of bulbs in the back yard next to the patio two years ago.  They have always grown well, but have never flowered, which may be due to the limited sunlight.





In what I'll call another design experiment, I decided to dig each of the bulbs up and move them out front to a triangular-shaped area formed by the maple, magnolia, and dogwood trees. 





Through whatever bit of creative inspiration, I thought this would make a nice area for some flowers.





I am told that these bulbs can be "divided" after a while.  As I removed each from the back yard, I divided where appropriate.





I quickly realized that this dividing process produces a lot more bulbs that I figured.





I kept digging, dividing, and transplanting. 





What originally occupied a smaller area in back .  .  .





.  .  . now occupies a much larger circular area out front.





Some mulch finished the project.





I'll have to remember that this area previously contained nothing but weeds.  I tried to remove as many as I could during the transplanting process.  But there is no way to get all of them.  This means I'll probably end up spending a lot of time pulling weeds that will appear out of nowhere.  I also don't expect any flowers to appear this year.  So the results of my labor won't be seen until next spring. 





I've said many times that Lowe's can be a dangerous place.  I figured if one rose bush can do well, why not try another.





The area where I planted the first rose bush is large enough to accommodate more.  I decided to press my luck.





The first rose bush is called a "Blushing Knock Out" that produces pink flowers.  I decided to plant a "Double Knock Out" next to it that flowers in a dark red.





I've got enough room here to accommodate more.  But for now, I want to see how these two do.





And yes, I still need more mulch !


« Last Edit: June 10, 2014, 09:48:47 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #21 on: June 27, 2014, 12:33:57 AM »

I probably wouldn't have planted the snowball bush that close to the house. They just get bigger and bigger, not just tall but really wide. Wide mainly from the fact that they just get more and more stalks or trunks from the base as they get older. I've got one in a little area next to a patio that leads to the pool that has arborvitaes and crepe myrtles and a walkway around the borders. It has completely filled that little area, even keeping it trimmed back through the years.

It was about 12' tall and 10' wide here....










I cut it WAY back this year, probably to about 5' tall and 4' wide. When it came out this spring it didn't bloom except for a few little "snowballs" but now its back almost as big as it was before I cut it back. 
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« Reply #22 on: June 28, 2014, 04:16:47 PM »

Oh !  I see what you mean.  I knew they could get large, but not that large.  This will be something to monitor as time goes on .  .  .
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« Reply #23 on: June 28, 2014, 07:06:16 PM »

But it was on sale .  .  .
May 24 - 25, 2014





I planted the second rose bush three weeks ago.  The blooms tell me that It seems to be pretty happy.





I have no idea how to properly care for rose bushes.  More research is needed before my bushes look like what I see on campus.


UGA Trial Gardens



It's safe to assume that A LOT OF RESEARCH will be needed before my roses look anything like these.  It's a lofty goal.  But if they can do it, I can certainly give it a try.


UGA Trial Gardens



This area beside the driveway is somewhat of a blank canvas.  Even the weeds are sparse.  I plan on doing additional work here, even though I don't have a specific idea in mind yet.  





I'm happy with the front of the house.  I didn't realize how large the shrubs I planted there can get until Lee pointed it out.  Don't know what to do about this yet.





So far, so good for my design experiments from before.








I've got a few flowers appearing around the maple tree.





All is well beside the driveway with all the Azaleas.





I'm anxious to see what becomes of the Bottlebrush shrub, only because it's different.  I'm not familiar with them at all, which is why I bought it.





Mulch is one of those things I always seem to need.  Lowe's had it on sale this weekend for Memorial Day, (5 bags for $10 !).  I spotted a Pink Flowering Dogwood on the clearance rack.  The 1/2 price tag grabbed my attention, (was $28.98, now $14).  And I think I've got the perfect place for it.





Last year, I planted a few things right off of my new patio area.  The Otto Luyken Cherry Laurel survived OK, but never really did anything else.  I decided to move it out front to the mailbox area thinking that more sunlight may be beneficial.





Enlarging the mailbox area is a simple matter of moving the bricks and removing some weeds.





And in the ground it went.





The Missouri Botanical Gardens website says this Cherry Laurel can get 3 - 4 feet tall.  That height will work very well with the Nandina plant.  But the site also notes that "Unpruned species plants can grow quite large."  





I'll have to keep the clippers handy.  





The new Dogwood tree now occupies the hole where the Cherry Laurel was.





Dogwood trees have me confused.  I have a Dogwood in my front yard, (i.e. in full sun).  I bought a Dogwood Cherokee Princess at the UGA Plantapalooza sale earlier this year, and distinctly remember the staff telling me that it liked full sun.  However, the tag on this Pink Flowering Dogwood from Lowe's recommends part sun.  





This reading-the-tag thing has worked well in the past.  So I think this location in back will be fine.





Speaking of Plantapalooza, I posed a question to one of the grad student staff members about my palm trees.  I planted four palm trees last year.  The Windmill Palm didn't make it through the fall.  The Pindo Palm succumbed to the harsh winter.  The Silver European Fan Palm outside my kitchen window is still green, but isn't exactly the healthiest looking specimen you've ever seen.  And I had given up hope on the Green European Fan Palm that I planted on the other side of the yard.





The grad student's advice was to give it time.  In a nutshell, the growing process takes place right in the center of the plant.  Individual branches that turn brown and fall over don't necessarily indicate that the plant is dead.  He told me to wait until the heat arrives this summer and see what happens.  And you know what ?  He was right !





Mother Nature took the opportunity to remind me who is in charge.  Thankfully, she waited until after I was done.  But check this out .  .  .





I've got rain and thunder directly overhead.  





It's dark enough for my outside lighting to kick on.  However, the sun is in the process of setting where there are no clouds.





This means I've got clouds and darkness, rain, and bright sunlight all at the same time !





Pretty cool .  .  .
« Last Edit: July 03, 2014, 01:25:52 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #24 on: July 05, 2014, 06:52:40 PM »

More creativity experiments .  .  .
June 21, 2014





Let's face it  -  I don't have the lush green, precisely manicured, and magazine-cover-worthy lawn like other residents in my neighborhood.  My front yard is probably 95 % weeds.  Dandelions, crabgrass, chickweeds, and other undesirables make up most of the "green" seen in my photos.  Coming to this realization has been the primary motivation behind my "design experiments" described herein.  If I plant something in the ground and it grows, awesome !  If it doesn't, the only thing I've lost is some weeds which will grow back rather quickly anyways.  In other words, I've got nothing to lose.  

The area next to the driveway by my Crape Myrtle is a perfect example.





In the pre-rose-bush era, this space looked pretty bare.


April 12, 2014



I liked the look of one rose bush well enough to plant a second.





There is enough room here to do more, I'm just not sure what.  So in another bit of "creativity," I decided to make a border using ornamental grasses.





Hameln Dwarf Fountain Grass will grow to around 20 inches tall, which will work well here.  I don't want to obscure the rose bushes with a tall grass plant, (like Pampas Grass or Maiden Grass which can reach 8 feet in height).  Hameln Dwarf Fountain Grass should create a nice accent border.





The bushes in front of the house and the Crape Myrtle/ornamental grass combo next to them form a nice shape.  I decided to continue the curve until it meets the sidewalk.





The space I need to create this border isn't that much.  The recommended spacing of 20 inches means 4 plants should work just fine.





In the ground they went.





I now have a small block of space to play with.  This will, no doubt, be a work in progress for a while until I formulate a few ideas.  But for now, I think this looks just fine.





A trip to Lowe's for any reason also includes picking up a few bags of mulch.  It provides good weed control which I really need out front.  The bulbs I moved earlier, even though they won't flower until next spring, are growing well.  Fresh mulch looks good.





I also added more mulch around the maple tree and lilies.





Ditto the pear tree, although I need more, as usual.





My palm tree is still green and appears to be doing well.  The Creeping Phlox is still green.





So far, so good for the cherry laurel I moved to the mailbox area.  





And I'm happy to report that the Pampas Grass plant I moved out front last year is now growing quite well.  It will be a while before it gets to 8 feet tall.  But that's ok.  It's growing !





I've got another Pampas Grass plant in back that could use moving.  This location seems to work .  .  .
« Last Edit: July 20, 2014, 01:27:43 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #25 on: July 06, 2014, 02:04:57 AM »

Hey Todd,

I hate to sound like a dick, but I'd like to ask you a favor. Out here in the sticks our internet is slow. Really slow. I love looking at your pics and reading your stories but your pictures are huge and the place you host them seems to be slow and there are so many of them in single posts that it literally takes us backwoods people 15 minutes to load a page. If you could, would you post 5-10 pictures in a single post and spread it out among multiple posts? That way it would be spread out over several pages. As it is now, it takes me 10 minutes or more to load one page and I can't reply to anything because if I try to do it, it takes another 10 minutes to load everything, then another 10 minutes to sort through them to quote a single pic and reply.

I hate to seem like an ass, but I often don't reply to stuff because it would literally take me an hour to load the page, load the reply, go through them and then post my response.

If you could, it would be greatly appreciated if you would break your posts up into a few pics at a time, that way it would roll over to the next page sooner and make it easier to reply to them. 

 
« Last Edit: July 06, 2014, 02:07:28 AM by Rather B.Blown » Logged



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« Reply #26 on: July 08, 2014, 01:03:31 AM »

Absolutely !  "Readability" is one of my primary concerns.  In the past, I've understood this to mean that the story must follow a logical progression and flow well.  But the idea of being able to actually see the post is equally as important.  I'll pay more attention to this in the future.

I've actually given the idea of moving outside of Athens into the nearby outlying areas some thought recently.  My goal would be to find a house that has some land, (i.e. 5 or more acres).  You're not the first person I've talked to who lives in "the sticks" that has mentioned having troubles with internet access .  .  .
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« Reply #27 on: July 20, 2014, 12:18:45 AM »

For Lee and anyone else who may have internet access issues and/or problems with Windows Live (where I host my photos)  -  hopefully, this will make reading through stuff a little easier .  .  .





Some additional maintenance .  .  .
Part 1 of 5
July 5 - 6, 2014





I made an interesting discovery last time.  Planting Pampas Grass in a sunny area makes it grow.  Who would have thought !





That poor guy above used to sit in my back patio area, which is mostly shaded.  I had a total of 4 Pampas Grass plants back there.  The abundance of shade makes the area great for being outdoors, but not so great for growing stuff, especially when what I'm trying to grow needs "full sunlight."  I moved the plant shown above out front at the end of last season.  It not only survived the cold winter, but is actually growing really well now.  This was enough motivation to move another one out front.  





I'll get the other two out there eventually.  By planting them on an angle off of the mailbox area, I can more or less separate that corner from the rest of the front yard.  This would allow for de-cluttering at the mailbox.  If needed, I can remove the bricks and move the Javelin Rush Grass plants outboard slightly to give the Bridal Wreath Spirea more room.  It's starting to get pretty big.





Even though I really like how this area turned out, I do realize that I planted too much stuff in that small area.  





I did some weeding and added mulch around the bulbs.  





The bulbs are growing really well.  





I'm not sure how the shape got to be somewhat .  .  . odd .  .  .  Surrounding them with ornamental grass would allow me to correct my out-of-round problem.  But I'll deal with that later.  





So far, so good for the Dogwood Cherokee Princess.





Ditto the Star Magnolia.


« Last Edit: July 20, 2014, 02:37:13 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #28 on: July 20, 2014, 12:45:52 AM »

continued .  .  .
Part 2 of 5
July 5 - 6, 2014





The project for this weekend was to pull more weeds and make what I'll call "visual" improvements.  Take the lilies around the maple tree, for example.





My original idea was to surround the tree with flowers.  So I weeded a 7-feet diameter circle around the tree and planted 10 lilies.  


April 26, 2014



As the lilies grew, (rather quickly I might add), they overtook the border.  The weeds at the border also grew, (faster than the lilies), which made the physical border disappear.


June 21, 2014



The solution to this dilemma involved  -  you guessed it  -  more weeding.  Essentially, the diameter of the circle around the tree grew by another foot.  Mulch should help to keep the weeds under control.  But it will still be my job to pull what does appear.





I did the same thing with the Javelin Rush Grass plants around the pear tree.





This works well.  But, I need to keep up with it for things to stay that way.  It's amazing how fast the stuff you don't want to grow actually grows.





I did the same thing around the palm tree.





I took advantage of this weeding mood I appeared to be in and weeded and mulched the front of the house by the Indian Hawthorn, small rose bush, and Frostproof Gardenia.





I added more mulch around the Chinese Snowball and Small Anise Tree.  Attacking both Ruby Loropetalum bushes above and below with the clippers gave the front of the house a much neater appearance.  My mind likes neat and tidy.





I see what Lee meant regarding how fast the Chinese Snowball grows.  Mine is now the same height as the Ruby Loropetalum.  This could get interesting in the future .  .  .
« Last Edit: August 24, 2014, 11:48:59 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #29 on: July 20, 2014, 01:23:10 AM »

continued .  .  .
Part 3 of 5
July 5 - 6, 2014





I cut a bunch of the dead branches off of the Leyland Cypress shrubs after the winter ended when the deer finished snacking on them.  The plant by the driveway has been growing very well ever since.





I thought all would be lost for the other one since it was decapitated.  But not so !  I've been watering it more often lately.  And it's responded by growing with a vengeance.  Awesome !





The new Hameln Dwarf Grass plants by the rose bushes already show noticeable growth.





This is another area that I have plans for, even though I don't know what they are yet.  I had a few Daffodils by the back patio that tried to bloom early each season.  One of them seemed to be pretty successful on a regular basis.  


February 8, 2013



This "sunlight-makes-plants-grow" discovery seems to be producing good results.  So I decided to apply this principle to the Daffodils.  I was able to find 5 bulbs in the general area where the guy above was located.  They went in the ground behind the Hameln Dwarf grass plants.  Don't know if they'll grow or not.  But we'll see.





All is well with Azalea Row by the driveway.  The biggest change here from years past is that I've been trying to get the size of the monster closest to the street under control.  


« Last Edit: July 20, 2014, 02:38:15 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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