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Author Topic: Spring 2014 is here already . . .  (Read 9459 times)
Oldcarsarecool
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« on: March 12, 2014, 12:55:23 AM »

Wait, wasn't it sleeting a week ago ?  
February 22, 2014





I'm a little late getting started this year with my annual yard adventure.  Call it a rather stern case of writer's block, if you will.  I think the more intense than normal winter we had in northern Georgia has a lot to do with that.  Life in the city of Athens, Georgia came to an abrupt halt in mid-February thanks to a sleet and freezing rain event.  I had about 2 inches of heavy sleet in my yard.  I hate snow !  This is downright depressing.

February 13, 2014



A mere nine days later, no evidence of the previous event exists.  Color is beginning to appear !  I feel better already.


February 22, 2014



These guys are in my back yard just off of my patio area.





What you see above and below is it.  There are two small clusters and a couple of individual stragglers all right in this area.





I don't know what they are.  But I wish I had a bunch more of them.





Looking closely at the photo below, a few blooms can be seen.  





I believe these are daffodils.  If I remember right, they always the first to wake up each season.  





This pattern plays itself out every February.  The blue flowers appear along with the daffodils.  "Green" starts to appear all over the rest of the yard.  I believe the photo below is of one of the Honeysuckles in my side yard.





Before the intense cold relaxed its grip on the area, the Japanese Camellia in the front yard started to bloom.





This shrub blooms early and keeps its blooms for months.  





It's a beautiful sight when in bloom.





I'll be adding pics periodically throughout the spring, that is, when I can get my lazy rear end outside to take pics.  But for now, this will get the year started.








Audience participation is encouraged !  
There is something about "Spring" that gets the happy chemicals in the brain flowing, especially after the more intense than normal winter.  I encourage everyone to get outside with your camera and take a few pics of your yard and post them here .  .  .
« Last Edit: July 11, 2015, 12:45:04 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2014, 05:23:52 PM »

Beautiful Todd! Took a while to load but I love those purple ones.

I went out and took a few on the cell phone but can't get photobucket to open. Basically we had freezing rain overnight and light snow most of the day. Even with temps in the mid 50's for a couple of days we still had some snow drifts over a foot deep. Worst winter around here in about 30 years but it's almost over. :'D
« Last Edit: March 12, 2014, 05:25:42 PM by Axe » Logged
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« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2014, 04:49:55 AM »

My wife said those look like a crocus and after doing a Google search I have to agree.
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Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2014, 08:39:34 AM »

Thanks Axe !  The crocus pics I see online do look similar.  Not sure which of the gazillion varieties I have, but I think you're right .  .  .
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« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2014, 06:52:49 PM »

Ok I've been trying all week. Lets see if this works. It's meant to be a parrody of Todd's original post. Normally by the time I get something posted on this stupid phone I'm so frustrated it comes out bad but it's taken me 4 days to get this far so bear with me please. It's suppose to br funny dammit!
« Last Edit: March 15, 2014, 07:26:15 PM by Axe » Logged
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« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2014, 07:36:36 PM »

I started with the truck pic above since this is an automotive forum. 1997 Ford f-150 4x4 parked in the front yard.

Next is a pic of my lovely roses planted at each end of the porch.

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« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2014, 07:51:48 PM »

Ok, that one came up as the Yucca plants at the end of the driveway. DOH! This phone won't copy/paste enough for the img codes so I'm typing them in one at a time.



« Last Edit: March 15, 2014, 08:20:07 PM by Axe » Logged
Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2014, 08:16:39 PM »

Hey Axe,

I fixed your line of code the last picture you posted.  You were missing the slash before the end 'img.'

There must be something wrong with your pics.  They are all extremely .  .  . white.  Looks very inhospitable.  The Yucca plants look .  .  . white.  I don't know about the daylilies.  But I see your vehicle garden looks .  .  . white.  The F150 looks .  .  . two-tone white.  Very strange indeed .  .  .

Grin
« Last Edit: March 15, 2014, 08:22:09 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2014, 08:49:45 PM »

Thanks Todd. I went back and deleted it because I couldn't find what was wrong with it. You hafd probably already corrected it for me... doh!

I think my problem is that I'm about 400 miles due North of where I need to be. That would put me right at I-40 about halfway between Knoxville and Nashville. Sounds like a good starting point anyway.

So the next pics above are the flowering cherry tree that Zoe and I planted last spring. Then behind the Yuccas is the large lilac bush out towards the mail box. That was 2x that big when we moved in last yr but it trimmed it back. It was actually here when my parents bought this place in 1971. I trimmed it back a couple of times back in the 70's also.

The large tree about 25' past the truck is a huge Ash tree. It's about 14' around, at 4' up from the ground.

The other pic is the beautiful peonies that everyone calls "pineys". There are also pink Naked Ladies and a few other flowers between them and the Yuccas.
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« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2014, 12:39:23 AM »

Time to see what I'm working with this year .  .  .  
March 12, 2014





I have heard people native to northern Georgia speak of just how harsh this winter has been.  I'm sure Lee can attest to this as well.  The snow, while enough to make life in Athens grind to a halt, wasn't as unusual as were the temperatures.  The months of January and February featured a few days where the daytime high temperature was lower   than the average overnight low.  In plant-speak, this translates into prolonged exposure to temperatures not normally seen in Plant Hardiness Zone 8a.  Unfortunately, this means I may encounter a few casualties when I hit the yard this spring.

I would love to say that everything I planted looks like this.





Whatever this is, it's beautiful !  Unfortunately, it's also not mine.  I love it, and need to get a few details from my neighbor so I can get one.  

Anyways, back to my yard, the patio area actually looks pretty good.  





The first thing you may notice is that the four Pampas Grass plants don't look too healthy.  This worried me at first.  But it seems that every Pampas Grass plant I see in this area looks like that right now.  I'm hoping this is what they do during the winter, and that all will be well later on.  

The Daffodil that was starting to bloom in the photos at the top of the page now sports a few flowers.  





The bulbs I planted a while back are growing.  They didn't bloom last year which, I think, is due to where I planted them.  These flowers like direct sunlight which is scarce in this area of the yard.  This means that they may not bloom this year either.  If that happens, I should probably dig them up and move them somewhere.  I'll cross that bridge when I get to it.





The three Japanese Boxwood shrubs I planted after I finished the patio seem to be doing alright.  I say "alright" because they are surviving and growing.  But for a "fast" growing shrub, I haven't noticed a significant increase in size.  My perspective is probably off.  As long as they are growing, I'm happy.  As an added bonus, the landscape fabric and mulch that surrounds each shrub appear to be doing a good job of keeping the weeds at bay.





I planted four palm trees last year.  One of them, a Windmill Palm, didn't make it through the summer, unfortunately.  The three remaining palm trees were a concern from the onset of winter.  All were labeled "Cold Hardy," and are supposed to be able to withstand isolated incidents of 10 - 15 degrees F.  But all bets are off with prolonged exposure.  The Silver European Fan Palm that sits outside my kitchen window is still green, but looks like it's been through a rough time as of late.





The Pindo Palm, which was actually growing at the end of last season, looks even worse.





I don't have a whole lot of hope for the Green European Fan Palm closest to the driveway either.





My Nandina garden is doing quite well.  Of course, this "Heavenly Bamboo" is considered invasive, which explains a lot.





The large cluster shown above sits at the head of my driveway.  Besides all of these, there are a few individual plants scattered here and there.  I've been trying to move all the stragglers to this main cluster whenever possible.  Transplanting them shouldn't be an issue considering that I've run them over with the lawn mower only to see them grow back.    

Green is appearing at a rapid pace on the driveway side of the yard.  I did some pruning and trimming over the winter in an attempt to shape things.





The Azaleas beside the driveway will be blooming soon.  





The Japanese Camellia began blooming last month and will continue to do so for a while.





I need to find out how to properly prune this shrub.  The blooms are beautiful.  But the shrub as a whole is getting a bit wild.





I'm quite happy with the two trees I planted in the front yard.  The Cleveland Select Flowering Pear is doing just that - flowering !








It looks like it's in the beginning stages of blooming, and should look quite nice when done.








The October Glory Maple is also doing quite well.





The two Leyland Cypress shrubs look somewhat sad, but not because of winter.  I originally planted them on either side of my front steps, which was fine until I realized that they have the potential to grow to 50 feet tall.  I moved both of them so they would have more space to grow, and all was well.  

I was leaving for work one afternoon when I happened to notice damage to both shrubs.  A closer inspection lead me to believe they had become a snack and/or scratching post for the local deer population.  The shrub by the driveway doesn't look too bad.





The shrub on the other side of the yard must have tasted really good.  I don't know if it will survive at this point.





It's a little hard to see from the photos.  But some activity is beginning at the Sweet Gum tree.  My experience has been that once this tree begins the greening process, it will go from bare to fully green in a matter of 3 - 4 weeks.





The bi-monthly Leaf and Limb Collection is scheduled for next week in my neighborhood.  So I'll be gathering all of the "grenades" that fall from one of these trees over the weekend.  A bunch of them can be seen in the photo below.  Walking barefoot in my yard is NOT ADVISABLE   under any circumstances !





And finally, I've mentioned several times in the past that my mailbox area has been the biggest surprise of my whole gardening adventure.  





The Javelin Rush grass has grown well since I planted it.  And the Bridal Wreath Spirea looks great.





So now, I play the waiting game to see what recovers .  .  .
« Last Edit: April 26, 2014, 11:36:22 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #10 on: March 16, 2014, 02:02:36 PM »

Got it done before the rain arrived .  .  . 
March 16, 2014





I managed to get most of the Sweet Gum tree grenades gathered and bagged yesterday before the rain arrived today.





That plus the all the branches make for a nice pile at the curb for Athens-Clarke County's bi-monthly Leaf & Limb collection.  My neighborhood is scheduled for this week.  Experience has shown me that the crew usually gets to my house on Wednesday.





As long as I'm outside, I might as well snap a few pics.  The color contrast of the Japanese Camellia blooms with the leaves makes for some nice photos.








I have trouble getting good pics against the clouds, especially when I'm trying to shoot the white flowers on the flowering pear tree.





In the photo above, I can hold the camera over my head and shoot downward so the white blooms show up against the green grass.  That works well for the small pear tree, but not so much for the giant Sweet Gum.





The only way I could capture any of the green starting to appear is to zoom in on it.





I'm experiencing the same problem with the white blooms on the Yoshino Cherry tree. 





I had a little more luck using the red bricks of the house as a background.





What am I seeing at the base of one of my pine trees ?





It looks like soap.  And it's in two spots.





Any ideas ?
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« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2014, 08:26:48 PM »

What a difference a week makes .  .  . 
March 22, 2014





My limited experience to this point suggests that once stuff begins to wake up, it does so rather quickly.  The Yoshino Cherry blooms before everything else except the Japanese Camellia.





One week ago, I saw a few white flowers appearing sporadically here and there.  Now, it's completely filled in.





The best vantage point is from the front yard where the white blooms stand out against the green pine tree behind it.





There is another white blooming tree near the property line between me and my next-door neighbor.





I'm not exactly sure what this tree is.  But the flowers and bark kinda-sorta resemble my Yoshino Cherry tree.  The many varieties of flowering cherry/pear trees look similar to my untrained eye. 





The Cleveland Select Flowering Pear tree is beginning to make the change from white to green.





The green leaves are starting to appear.  The flowers on this tree are beautiful.





I'm starting to get the hang of this "Manual Focus" setting on the camera.





Manual focus turned out to be the best way to capture the new growth on the Sweet Gum tree in the front yard.





My camera allows for manual focusing via a thumb wheel on the back of the camera body.  Spinning this wheel manually adjusts the focus.  A distance scale is displayed in the viewfinder which is extremely handy considering the small screen.  I found that if I could accurately estimate the distance between me and what I am trying to photograph, I could get a good picture.





The small side yard will be completely filled in within a couple of weeks. There has already been a drastic change from a week ago.








I'm starting to notice some purple appearing in the back yard.





I'm not sure what these trees are.  But I have four of them in back.





Some sun and warmth is in the forecast for this week.  I'll get some better pics then .  .  .
« Last Edit: April 27, 2014, 01:51:06 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #12 on: April 05, 2014, 09:11:39 PM »

The sun appears to be delayed .  .  .
March 28, 2014





I can't complain, however.  Mother Nature can water everything as often as she deems necessary.  





Once the blooms on the Yoshino Cherry tree have run their course, they will fall to the ground.  Adding some wind to this equation gives the appearance of "snow."  The rain makes it "stick."





Despite the abundance of "snow," the tree appears completely white from the front yard.  





But some green is beginning to make inroads amongst the white blooms.  It won't be long before it will be completely green.





I know the sun will appear eventually.  When it does, I'll get a few more pics .  .  .
« Last Edit: April 26, 2014, 11:51:51 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #13 on: April 26, 2014, 11:27:55 PM »

Ok, there it is .  .  .
March 31, 2014





The month of March in northern Georgia typically behaves like a roller coaster.  Temperatures are on the rise during this time of year.  Highs in the low 80s occur regularly.  Then a front passes through bringing with it daytime highs in the low 40s, followed by a rebound a day or two after that.  This year was no different other than it seemed like it rained a lot.  The greening process will still occur in the rain.  But the photos don't quite have that "Ooh" and "Aah" factor like those from a sunny day.  The handful of pics posted above that I took three days ago in the rain are ok, but not "wow."

It took a while.  But the sun eventually did make an appearance bringing warmer temperatures with it.  The Boxster thermometer was telling me 80 degrees today. I decided to take a few happy pictures before heading to work.  My neighbor, Sparkle, saw me wandering around the yard with the camera and decided to say hello.





Three days ago, the Yoshino Cherry tree was still mostly white.  Today, green seemed to hold a slight advantage.





The bulbs I planted a couple of years ago are growing well, but are still not blooming, and have not done so since planting.  I think I'm going to have to move them to a sunnier area.  While it would be nice to have flowers like that in the area by the patio, I don't think there is enough direct sunlight to provoke flowering.





I've got several of these in the yard.





The name I've heard most often is an Eastern Redbud tree.





It's a common sight in this part of the country.  These Redbuds grow wild all over the place around here.





They're hard to see against the other trees.  But the redish color is really beautiful.  I need to figure out how to properly prune them so as to spur more growth.  I want mine to look like what you see when you Google "Eastern Redbud Tree" and check out some of those images.  Mine look like sticks by comparison.





I"ve got the four shown above in the back yard, and one more in the side yard by the Azaleas.





Speaking of which, I've got some activity occurring at the row of Azaleas by the driveway.





The red part of this cluster awakens first each spring. 





The rest will follow suit in time.  But for now, all is still pretty quiet.





The Sweet Gum tree is doing well.





Now that I've actually got a sunny day, the greening can be seen very well against the blue sky.





Activity is beginning at the Dogwood tree in front as well.  This tree usually flowers in a pinkish color each spring.





The Japanese Camellia looks great.  I need to figure out how to prune this tree as well.  It's getting a little wild looking.





The white flowers of the Cleveland Select Flowering Pear tree have been replaced with green.  This tree has been doing very well ever since I planted it last year. 





The October Glory Maple tree is beginning to wake up.  It, too, has done really well since planted.





I've said before that the mailbox area has been the biggest surprise of my whole planting adventure.  Everything I've put there to this point has done really well.  Keeping the English Ivy in check has been more of a project than I had anticipated.  Soon, the Bridal Wreath Spirea will flower white. 





I've got two Loropetalum shrubs against the house in front.   Both are mostly green at this point.





I think the green represents the "old growth" of the shrub.  When the spring blooming season arrives, "new growth" will be purplish in color. 





I've got a few things in store for the spring planting season, so stay tuned .  .  .
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« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2014, 11:29:06 PM »

Time to get this show on the road .  .  .
April 5 - 6, 2014





Ah yes  -  the tell-tale sign that spring has actually arrived in northern Georgia .  .  .





It doesn't matter what color your house, car, clothes, or anything else that sits outside may be during the other 50 weeks of the year.  For a couple of weeks at the beginning of April, everything turns to a hazy pale yellow color.  





Those of us with allergies don't need to look at a calendar to know when this happens.  Trust me, we are immediately aware it !





This also means that everything that should be awakening at this time should be well on its way by now.  Three weeks ago, the Sweet Gum tree was still asleep.


March 12, 2014



Today, its explosion is pretty evident.





And speaking of explosions, check out the Dogwood tree !





Last year, I decided to fix an Autism-related issue by removing a couple of large almost horizontal branches that gave the whole tree the appearance of falling to one side.


June 8, 2013



This type of pruning appears to spur new growth.  This is the best this tree has looked since I moved here in 2009.





The Cleveland Select Flowering Pear tree appears to be really happy and doing very well in this location.





The October Glory Maple tree has also done well since I planted it two years ago.





The Bridal Wreath Spirea is blooming, and looks really great against the green ornamental grasses and Nandina plant by the mailbox.





Earlier in the week, the Azaleas along the driveway began their annual staggered blooming cycle.  The large cluster closest to the street is usually the first to wake up.





This Azalea Society of America page indicates that there are more than 10,000 different varieties of Azalea plants.  I'm sure the horticulturists among us can probably name quite a few of them and offer some of the distinguishing characteristics of each. The gardening noob like me, however, looks at things in a much simpler way.  I've got two colors here, one red and the other white.  Red always appears first and does so with authority !





White is beginning to appear and will soon follow with the same blooming intensity.





The others in the line along the driveway will awaken in time.





I'm going to do something with the front of the house, although I haven't decided exactly what.  There are 3 smaller shrubs that are beginning to look like they're not long for this world.  Two of them can be seen immediately to the right of the green "Mr. Goldstrike" Japanese Aucuba in the center of the photo below.  I'm beginning to see more sticks than green leaves.





The two Ruby Loropetalum bushes always do well, and are beginning to show some color.  I'm thinking about adding some sort of contrasting color to the red of the Loropetalum.  





I've got a bunch of these little guys in my front lawn.





I'm guessing this is some kind of weed.  But it looks really nice when blooming.





I'm getting the hang of this "manual focus" setting on the camera.  Finally.








Let's get this planting adventure started .  .  .
UGA holds its "Plantapalooza" spring plant sale about this time every year.  This is a massive sale conducted in three locations as a joint venture between the State Botanical Garden of Georgia (about 2 miles from work), the UGA Trial Gardens (across from the basketball/gymnastics arena on campus), and the UGA Horticulture Club (across the parking lot from work).  It's huge, and yes, it's a big deal.





Earlier in the week, I began to see the signs of activity.  A bunch of display tables and a tent appeared at the Hort. Club building.  Large signs began to appear along the various roadways.  Plants of all shapes, sizes, and colors began to appear by the truckload.  I managed to get my lazy rear end out of bed on Saturday April 5 to have a look.  





A wide variety of visitors were in attendance.  Some were there to look and gather ideas.  Others already had ideas and were in search of something very specific.  And some like me had ideas, but lacked the ability to conceptualize them in any way other than wandering around and waiting to be hit by some inspiration.  This individual in particular must have had his eyes on something rather tasty.  





You may have noticed in the flyer above under the UGA Horticulture Club's description the line that stated, "Horticulture professors will answer questions and offer advice on selections."  They were probably sorry they printed that after encountering me.  I think I wore a few professors and students out with my questions and repeated offers/pleas to rent the department to come to my yard.  

And with that said .  .  .





The Jag only has so much room .  .  .
No, it's not really designed for carrying trees.  But the Jag did quite well as a plant utility vehicle for the 2 trips I made to the sale.





In the passenger seat in the photo above is an Acer Palmatum "Seiryu."  While it may sound like an exotic laptop computer, the more common name is a Seiryu Japanese Maple tree.  The Trachycarpus Fortunei, or Windmill Palm tree, was small enough to fit in the trunk.  





Tagging along for trip number 2 were two Ilex Crenata "Sky Pencil" Japanese Hollys and a Magnolia Stellata "Star Magnolia" tree.  





The Rhododendron "Delaware Valley" White Azalea fit nicely in the trunk.  





I now have 6 new residents registered and waiting patiently for accommodations.





Starting at the left, the Windmill Palm tree is going out front.  Last year, I planted a Windmill Palm tree in the back yard that, unfortunately, didn't survive.  I think I planted it in the wrong location (not enough sun), and under the wrong conditions, (Georgia red clay may make a great dirt track racing surface, but doesn't make the best "well drained soil").  I tried unsuccessfully to save it by moving it out front into a 3-foot-deep hole that I back-filled with some sand and garden soil.  The hole is still there and already prepped for a palm tree.  The sunny location should yield better results for a tree that is actually alive.

The Star Magnolia likes full sun.  So it will go in the front yard as well.  The White Azalea will go in line with the others next to the driveway.





The two Sky Pencil Hollys will fit perfectly in the area next to my front steps.  And the Seiryu Japanese Maple tree will go in the back yard in the hole originally occupied by the first Windmill Palm tree mentioned above.  I am told that it likes "filtered" sunlight, which should make this location ideal.





Let’s get started .  .  .





I need to concentrate on this “following directions” thing .  .  .
The immediate area on either side of my front steps was empty from the time I moved in until March 24, 2012 when I planted two Leyland Cypress shrubs.  


March 24, 2012



That idea seemed great until I realized that a Leyland Cypress can grow to more than 50 feet tall and 15 feet in diameter.  The following year, I moved them out in to the yard, (little did I realize that they would become snacks for the deer traveling through the neighborhood), and replaced them with a pair of Gold Breeze Miscanthus ornamental grass plants.


May 18, 2013



This great idea on paper didn’t work out at all in practice.  The right hand Miscanthus plant never seemed happy from day one.  The left hand plant did ok for a short time then followed the same pattern.  I tried to put them in pots thinking that I had a soil problem.  But it didn’t matter.  They had both ceased to be.





The Sky Pencil Holly is just what the name implies – it grows more vertical than horizontal.  Maximum height appears to be 8 – 10 feet.  The maximum diameter of 3 feet will work very well for the proposed space.





This will be the third time holes have been dug in this location.  It felt nice to stick the shovel in the ground to encounter actual soft dirt for a change.





The planting process remains the same – dig the hole at least twice as wide as the width of the pot, add some “tree and shrub” garden soil, and put the plant in the ground.





I wanted to make sure I got both shrubs centered in relation to the steps, and in relation to each other.








Once planted, I reused the existing landscaping fabric which will get covered with mulch.





This will be the third time I am trying to get something to grow here.  Cross your fingers !  





The new Windmill Palm tree will go in the spot where I tried to save the old Windmill Palm tree from last year.  The hole is already dug and prepped for it.  





The Hort. Club staff enlightened me on the fact that I don’t need to dig three feet down to plant a palm tree, (“I’ll save you A LOT of work” was the professor’s comment).  His advice was to dig down slightly deeper than the depth of the pot, but at least double the width, more if possible.  This meant that instead of preparing the dynamite to blast through more red clay, I just needed to remove a few weeds and widen the existing hole slightly.  Imagine that .  .  .





Windmill Palms like full sun and require little water once established.  I translate this to mean, “requires little input from me,” which will work out much better for the plant in the long run.





This part of the yard gets a lot of sunlight, which should work out well.





I’ve been trying to prune and shape the Azaleas along the driveway ever since I moved in five years ago.  And all has been well.  Every year, they get much more “full” in appearance and produce wonderful blooms in the spring.





The only drawback is that all this cleaning has resulted in a large gap between the two plants that sit furthest from the street.





My Azalea knowledge is limited to “color.”  I’ve got “bright red” and “white” at the end of the driveway, followed by “dark red,” followed by more “bright red.”  I decided to break up the row of red color with a Delaware Valley “white” Azalea.





Digging in this location proved to be more challenging due to the large trees in the immediate vicinity.  But one sawzall later, I had room.





The gaps between each plant are now a little more consistent.  The long-term goal is for each plant to be the approximately the same size and roughly the same distance away from its neighbor.  I think this will look really nice in the future.  





The Star Magnolia should grow to between 10 – 20 feet tall and 8 – 15 feet in diameter.  It likes full sun, so it has to go out front.





I planted the October Glory Maple tree in the center of the front yard two years ago.  This has served as a “dividing line” of sorts.  Meaning until now, I had been concentrating on the area inboard of the maple tree, (i.e. between the tree and the house).  This will be my first venture into the outboard part of the yard.





I dug a wide hole in the ground, backfilled with “tree and shrub” garden soil, and put the plant in the ground.  





Eventually, I think I’ll try and “decorate” around each tree by doing something like encircling the base of each with ornamental grass, like the Javelin Rush I have at the mailbox.  But that is a project for another day.





For now, my goal is to get everything planted.  I’ll worry about the details over the next few weeks.  





I’ve got one tenant remaining that requires planting, an Acer Palmatum "Seiryu."  It sounds like a Laptop tree, but is actually a Japanese Maple.  The directions say that it likes “filter sunlight.”  In Todd’s world, this translates to the back yard.





The first Windmill Palm tree from last year originally occupied this space, and was never really happy from day one.  





The existing hole has already been backfilled with “tree and shrub” garden soil.  As in the case of the spot out front, I just needed to remove a few weeds and widen the hole a bit.





Hopefully, this work.





I think I would eventually like to get rid of the rotting railroad ties and replace them with landscaping pavers of some kind.  But for now, this will work fine.


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