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Author Topic: 9th Annual Mack Evans Memorial Cruise In, The Varsity, November 10, 2013 . . .  (Read 26571 times)
Oldcarsarecool
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« on: January 04, 2014, 06:11:29 PM »

The last show of the season .  .  .  
November 10, 2013





The Street Masters Car Club of Athens, Georgia hosts a cruise in at the beginning of each month at The Varsity from April through November.  These events are quite well known in the Athens area, and are always pretty crowded.  The actual number of people may not be that large compared to other events.  But packing all those people onto The Varsity's property makes for some tight quarters.  

The last show of the season is known as the Mack Evans Memorial Cruise In.  Mack Evans was a founding member of the Street Masters Car Club and, if I had to guess judging by the comments I hear, a pretty knowledgeable car builder as well, (there is always talk of those "cars that Mack built."  Mack passed away from cancer several years ago.  As a tribute, the club dedicates the final show of the season to his memory.  This year's event marked the 9th iteration of the Mack Evans Memorial Cruise In.





This show is huge, attracting more than 300 cars, which is just about the limit of what The Varsity can handle.  The rule for this show is get there early, otherwise parking is by no means guaranteed.  The show usually starts in the 1 PM time frame.  I arrived at 12:30 PM to find 3 of the 4 available parking areas completely full.  Arrivals were being directed to the grass area along Broad Street beside Milledge Avenue.  








I have said this many times in the past.  I try and keep the Jag "clean."  And it is until   I take it to a show.  Then all this dirt suddenly appears that I know was not there beforehand.





Earlier in the morning, I hit the local car wash, and followed that up with a good coat of wax.  The big scratch seen below was there when I bought the car.  I just haven't done anything about it yet.





Other than that, I don't think the car looks bad at all.








A selfie in the driver's side .  .  .





.  .  . and in the hood .  .  .





I found the car especially dirty on the inside.  The cream leather is quite susceptible to dirt.





The big 4.0L I-6 in all its silent and vibration-free glory.  This is one of the smoothest power plants in the industry .  .  .





I took roughly 180 pictures in addition to a bunch of great video clips which I'll post at the end, (once I get them assembled together).  On with the show .  .  .
« Last Edit: January 04, 2014, 06:41:15 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2014, 07:06:31 PM »

I parked next to a 1961 Buick Invicta convertible, one of 3,953 made that year.





At the time of the show, the car was for sale.  Asking price was $23,500. 





Next to the Buick was a rare 1957 Oldsmobile Super 88.





The "rare" part of the story stems from what sits under the hood.





That would be the 371 cubic inch "Rocket" V-8 complete with the J-2 Tri-Carb option.  Normal driving was managed via the center carb.  Planting your right foot on the floor opened up the the other two, a combination good for 300 hp.  If this is a factory built car, it's one of an estimated 2,500 produced that year.





The paint on this 1970-71 Camaro reminded me of that style I used to see a lot when I was a kid. 





I wasn't able to get any of the details.  But the car is big-block powered and was very well done.





Across from me under the giant Magnolia tree sat this very original looking Model A Ford.  It reminds me of a "Preservation Class" car, or one that has had no restoration work of any kind performed.  The car owner has had this car for more than 40 years.





This 1972 Olds 442 convertible is a regular at local shows. 


[


It's been for sale for a little while.  I don't know any of the details regarding price or originality.  For 1972, the "442 Appearance and Handling Package" reverted back to being an option package ordered via RPO W29.  Because it was not a separate model with its own style code, there is no way to verify a genuine 442 via the VIN or trim tag.  The exception to this is if the 5th digit of the VIN is an "X," indicating a W30 455 which was only available in a 442.


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« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2014, 11:42:49 PM »

Now here's something unusual .  .  .





It's normal to see people enjoying the car show with their dog on a leash.  But seeing someone taking their pot-belly pig for a walk around the show field doesn't happen too often.





This little guy had a crowd around him everywhere he went.  And, he thoroughly enjoyed the attention.





I've commented in the past how much I like to see something different at a car show.  This 1968 Buick Wildcat is a perfect example.





The Wildcat was Buick's version of full-size muscle, (i.e. Pontiac Grand Prix, Oldsmobile Starfire, Ford Galaxie 500, etc.).  This particular car appears to be all original and nicely preserved.  Power comes from Buick's 430 CID V-8 that makes 360 hp.  Its 475 ft-lbs of torque is available at 3200 rpm. 





The giant Magnolia trees provided great cover for the cars in this area, including a very nice 1965 Chevy Impala and a 1940 Ford street rod.





On the left in the photo below is a 1961 Studebaker Champ pickup.  Next to it is a 1970 Pontiac GTO Judge.





I'm not sure if that Judge is the real thing.  But it would be one of only 3,629 hardtops if it is.





This 1954 Cadillac Series 75 Limo was beautiful !





And it's actually quite rare.  Cadillac only produced 3,135 Series 75 cars in three different styles in 1954.  Notice where the fuel cap is located under the left rear tail lens.





The space under the hood would normally be occupied by Cadillac's 331 CID V-8 that made 230 hp.  This car has been upgraded with a modern drivetrain.  Judging by the old points-style distributor and power steering pump, I'd call it a 1968 - 69 472 CID V-8 which made 375 hp, and more importantly, 525 ft-lbs of torque (available at 3000 rpm).  This would definitely move the 5,000 pound limo around with a little more ease.





I'm not a big fan of large wheels.  But this 1970 Olds Cutlass convertible was beautiful otherwise.





A trio of Chevrolet products were gathered in this area.  The Chevelle is a 1970 SS 454.  Not sure if it's original or not.  The silver Camaro in the middle is a 1967.  And the red Camaro on the end is a 1969 Z28 RS.





The Chevelle is a factory 4-speed car.





The 1969 Z28 is the real thing.





The trim tag breaks down as follows:
~  ST69 12437 =  1969 Camaro coupe.
~  NOR142537 BDY = Norwood, Ohio assembly plant and 6-digit Fisher Body sequence number.
~  TR 711 = Interior trim code:  Black standard bucket seats.
~  -  - PNT =  Exterior paint code:  A Camaro could be ordered in a color not normally available on a Camaro.  Such special paints were designated with a dash, " - ".  Since two dashes are present, this car did not come with a vinyl top, (i.e. the body and roof were painted the same color).
~  09E = build date:  5th week of September 1968.
~  X33 = the much discussed Norwood X Codes.  The Norwood assembly plant used a series of 7 different "X Codes" to designate the various Camaro models available.  Long story short, X33 = Z28 with the Style Trim option (RPO Z21).  All RS cars have the Style Trim option (it was part of the RS package).  In other words, the information on the trim tag supports what equipment is present on the car.
~  D80 = front and rear spoiler package.





In front of the Chevrolets sat a couple of 1963 Ford Falcons.





The blue convertible is a relatively rare Falcon Sprint convertible, one of 4,602 made that year.





A modified 289 CID V-8 sits under the hood.  In 1963, the biggest hammer available was the 164 hp 260 CID V-8.


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« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2014, 01:08:30 AM »

I've seen "The Midi" at previous shows.





What we have, here, is a 1974 Austin Mini that began life with 850 cc under the hood sending 34 hp to the front wheels.  After an encounter with a welder and a few wrenches, we now have a mid-ship mounted 3.2L Acura V-6 sending 280 hp to the rear wheels.  Zero to 60 mph acceleration has been improved from "plausible" to around 4 seconds. 





This monster is the creation of Mini Tec from Royston, Georgia about an hour up the road.  Whatever is needed to squeeze a Honda VTEC engine into a classic Mini can be found there.





This is a nicely preserved 1956 Ford Fairlane Club Sedan.





It's not a rare car by any means, (more than 142k produced).  I've seen a lot of Victorias and Crown Victorias in this body style before.  But I don't ever recall seeing a "Club Sedan."





I have seen plenty of 1966 Ford Fairlanes in the past.  But few were as nice as this GTA model. 





According to the display card, this is a rust-free car that still has all of its original equipment.  The exterior has been freshened, but that's it.





Power comes from Ford's well proven but not really fast 390 CID V-8.  Factory air conditioning would be a rare option for this car.





The interior is described as all original.  The odometer shows 94k original miles.





A beautiful car in all respects !  I really love the dark blue color.





The pictures I have posted so far were all taken in the immediate vicinity of where I was parked, which would account for about 1/4 of the total attendance.  I headed across the Milledge Avenue entrance to check out the rest of the show, and was greeted by this.  If I had to guess, I'd say this is a medium duty Chevy Kodiak/GMC Topkick.





Uhm .  .  . YES  it does .  .  .





Whoever did the paint on this truck did a great job with the ghost flames.





And what was this giant hauling ?





This is a beautiful blown 1941 Willys.  I don't know the specs on the engine, other than it sounded quite healthy.  We'll get to hear this car run later on.





And like the hauler, the paint on this car was flawless !


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« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2014, 02:41:56 PM »

I headed into the shaded grass area directly off of Milledge Avenue.  Once the main paved parking area fills up, this area is filled next. 





And "filled" it certainly was !  You can see in the photo above that cars are parked 3-deep next to the Milledge Avenue entrance to The Varsity's parking lot.





When I first saw this street rod pickup, I didn't know what it was other than beautifully done.





It's actually a very rare 1939 Studebaker Coupe-Express pickup.





In those days, Studebaker's truck offerings were aimed at the medium and heavy duty market, (from the J-15 1 1/2-ton to the J-30 4-ton).  The light duty J-5 Coupe-Express was introduced in 1937.  The "Coupe-Express" name comes from the fact that it had passenger car "coupe" seating and an "express" body, (i.e. what we call a pickup today). 



(from studebakerpictures.com, click for more info !)


The body shell of the Coupe-Express truck was based on that of the 4-door sedan passenger car.  This means that just about every option would interchange between the two.  I have said many times in the past that Studebaker was way ahead of its time.  This pre-War light duty truck could be equipped with unheard of "luxuries" like leather seats, interior lighting, warm-air defroster, and an automatic choke with high idle. 





Unfortunately, Studebaker ended up being too far ahead of its time.  Studebaker car dealers without a truck franchise didn't know what to do with it.  Most of their customer base was not looking for a light duty pickup.  Those who were looking for a small truck were surprised by the price, ($733 vs. $585 for a Ford, and $572 for a Chevy).  Adding the "luxury" options also pushed the price tag further upward. 





Studebaker offered a better engineered and better equipped product than any of its competitors, but did so in an era where the market for such a product did not exist.  In other words, Studebaker was offering a "luxury pickup truck" a full half-century before it became fashionable !  It took Ford and Chevrolet two decades to play catch-up with the Ranchero and El Camino, respectively.  From what I read, Studebaker produced around 1,200 J-5 Coupe-Express pickups in 1939, making this truck quite rare.





This 1953 Ford Courier 1/2 ton Sedan Delivery appears to be in the midst of an identity crisis. 





Let me clarify:  The display says it's a 1953.





However, I think I'm seeing a lot of 1954 parts, including the whole front clip and lower body side trim.  I love the color !





I continued walking along the Milledge Avenue side of the property.  I've seen the white/light blue 1956 Pontiac Cheiftan wagon, Porsche 928, and 1950 Ford at previous shows.





Trucks just aren't my thing.  I can most definitely appreciate and respect them as collector vehicles.  But I've personally never been into trucks.  This 1967 Ford F100 Ranger, however, is different.





Long before the compact pickup of the same name was introduced in 1983, the name "Ranger" was used on the full-sized F-Series truck line, (an upper-level trim package).





This particular truck is one of the nicest restorations I've ever seen.





And apparently, I'm not alone in that thinking.  This truck was awarded "Best in Class" at the Ford F100 Supernationals in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee in 2013. 





The 390 CID V-8 under the hood was a dealer installed option.





This has to be one of the nicest F100 Rangers in the country .  .  .
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« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2014, 10:48:32 AM »

This 1954 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing is a regular at local car shows. 





I have chatted with the car owner in the past.  According to his research, of the 1400 Gullwing coupes produced, only 15 were made in this color.  Best of all, this stunning automobile is no trailer queen.  I give the owner credit for driving his extremely rare work of art to every show.





The back side of The Varsity's property borders Reese Street.  Cars were packed in here also.





This 1966 Chevelle SS396 is my favorite kind of muscle car  -  an unassuming color, painted steel wheels, and "poverty" hubcaps.  Unless you know what the crossed flag "Turbo-Jet" emblem means, this car is a sleeper.





And, it's the real thing.





From the top:
01B = build date:  2nd week of January 1966.
ST 66-13817 = style code:  1966 Malibu SS hardtop coupe.
ATL 4124 BODY = assembly plant:  Atlanta, Georgia, Fisher Body unit number 4124
TR 763-B = interior trim codes:  Black imitation leather bucket seats.
W-W PAINT = exterior paint codes:  Chateau Slate lower and upper, meaning this car doesn't have a vinyl roof.

The next line represents the Group Options codes.
W = Group 1 option code W:  Tinted windshield
2KMGS = Group 2 options:  K=air conditioning, M=Powerglide auto transmission, G=center console, S=rear antenna.
L = unknown.  According to Chevellestuff.net, the meaning of the "L" on the bottom of the tag is currently not known.  This code appears on Atlanta tags only between certain production dates. 
4 = Final inspection stamp indicating that the vehicle was ready for shipment.

Two things stand out.  Originally, this car was painted Chateau Slate which, according to Chevellestuff.net, is a silver-ish color.  Personally, I think Lemonwood Yellow (Y-Y) looks great.  This car also left the factory with a Powerglide automatic transmission which has been replaced with a 4-speed.





Awesome car !  We'll get to hear it run later .  .  .
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« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2014, 11:36:00 AM »

Mercury's versions of the Ford Fairlane and Torino were called the Mercury Montego and Cyclone, respectively.  This 1968 Cyclone GT fastback is one of 6,105 produced that year.





Power comes from Ford's 390 CID V-8 that makes 325 hp in 4-bbl form.





Ford did the "fastback" styling theme better than anyone else, in my opinion.





Next to the Cyclone sat a 1968 Mustang, the color of which makes you think "Bullitt."  Next to that car were two 1967 Camaros with contrasting paint/stripe combinations.  Very cool !





This is a 1962 Dodge Polara 500 convertible.





The early 1960s Mopars were known for their "different" styling, which I really like, personally.  I also really like what Chrysler did with their instrument panels in those days.  Love the creativity here.





Polara production that year totaled 12,268 cars in three body styles.





Someone brought a new CTS-V to the show.  They're beautiful cars, no question.  But this one looks out of place surrounded by street rods.





Further down that row, one of each first generation Ford Thunderbird model year was represented.  On the left in the photo below is a 1957 model, on the right is a 1955.





In front of them was a beautiful 1956 model.


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« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2014, 08:47:29 PM »

You can see in the photos above that I have arrived at the main paved parking area.  This is the actual "entrance" to the show field.  Registration, door prize tickets, and 25-50-25 tickets are all handled here.  This is also the area that fills up almost immediately after the sun rises.  I remember event MC Tommy Landrum making the comment, "I got here at 7:30 AM and there were already people in line."  I stopped back at my car just to make sure all was well before heading in, (which it always is).  I spotted this Ferrari 308 GTS in The Varsity's customer parking area.





For years, I have said, "Someday, I'll own one," for three reasons.  The 308/328 body represents the "classic Ferrari" shape.  Thanks to Magnum P.I., this is what a lot of people envision when someone says the word "Ferrari."  I've also had the opportunity to drive one.  Howdy Ellenberger was storing a 308 for someone at his museum in Altoona when I worked there.  I remember my drive around the museum property being a deep religious experience.  I fit perfectly in the driver's seat, and everything fell to hand quite easily.  Now add to this the fact that the 308, at least on the surface, appears to be affordable to mere mortals.  Mint condition, low miles 308s can be had for less than $30k. 





"Affordable" is a relative term.  I did some internet research a couple of years ago in an attempt to figure out what this means in Ferrari-speak.  Joe Average can afford to "buy" a Ferrari without much drama.  However, having to perform repairs of any kind other than basic maintenance has the ability to produce financial ruin.  Even with me fixing cars for a living, the cost of Ferrari parts is absolutely insane.  This will never stop me from wanting one, however.





Earlier, we looked at "The Midi," an Acura-powered mid-engine 1974 Austin Mini.  Another Mini Tec product was on display, this one being called the "Monster Mini." 





Mini Tec's website calls this car a 240 hp K20A Type-R Mini.





Power is put to the ground via an all-wheel drive system from, I think, a CR-V, (not 100% sure).





Building one of these cars, even with a Mini Tec kit, involves a lot of fabrication.  But the end result looks like a lot of fun.  With 240 hp, AWD, and practically no weight to move, I imagine this car would be scary-fast.





Cobra replicas are always a favorite.  This particular car looks great in a "something-other-than-blue" color.  I don't know who the manufacturer is, but the details were well done.





The blown SRS-powered 1969 Camaro was back again.  I think this car was professionally done in both appearance and functionality.  We'll get to hear this car run later .  .  . as in really run  later on.  The vid will definitely be worth your time, I assure you.


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« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2014, 11:31:28 PM »

From the left, we have a Chevrolet 3100 Series half-ton pickup (also called the Advanced Design series), a 1948 Dodge pickup, and a pair of 1939 Fords in Standard trim, (two trim levels were offered in those days - Standard and Deluxe).





Giant Lincolns, particularly the 1970s models through 1979, rank very high on my list of all-time favorite drivers.  This is a 1977 Lincoln Continental Formal Sedan.





I'm very familiar with the Continental Town Coupe' and Town Car.  But my brief internet research turned up nothing on a "Formal Sedan," which tells me that it probably wasn't a factory option.  I'm going to call this a custom conversion package, although I'm not 100 percent sure.  Companies such as Hess & Eisenhardt, AHA, Moloney, and Silcco were known for their professional cars and limousines.  My guess is that customers wanting something a little fancier than the standard car, but not necessarily a giant stretch limo, could turn to something like this Formal Sedan.  This car has special trim, wire wheels, upgraded interior features, and a "Continental Hump" trunk lid as seen below.





This is a frame-off restored 1963 Chevrolet Impala SS 409.





The big 409 CID V-8 was available in several stages of tune.  Base 409s had hydraulic lifters and made 340 hp in single 4-bbl form.  Switching to solid lifters raised the power to 400 hp.  Adding a second 4-bbl carburetor increased the power to 425 hp.  Customers with an extra $1,240 in their bank accounts, (which was almost 50 percent of the cost of the car), could order RPO Z11.  The 409 was enlarged to 427 CID, and stuffed full of racing-only goodies.  Laughably rated at 430 hp, this 348-409.com article estimates actual output to be north of 500 hp.  A documented Z11 car is extremely rare, (only 57 were produced). 





This particular car is equipped with the base 340 hp 409 and 4-speed manual transmission.








I saw a couple street rods further down that row done in this "T-Bucket" style.





I don't know the details of the first one other than it's big-block powered.





It also had huge rear tires.





The interior fabric reminds me of alligator leather.





That car's cousin sat a couple of spaces away.  The overall styling theme of both cars is quite similar - the colors, big-block power plants, rear tires, exhaust pipes, etc.





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« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2014, 02:25:25 PM »

I saw a couple of 1950s Ford Panel Trucks on display.  This Ford Panel Truck rat rod is from the early 1950s based on the front end. 





A couple of spaces away sat this award winning 1957 Ford Panel Truck.





Among the extensive modifications was a 557 CID V-8 with 2 4-bbl carbs.





According to the display, it has been chopped, channeled, shortened, and tubbed.





The seats came from a Saab.





This truck was beautiful, and was awarded "Truck of the Year 2012" at the F100 Supernationals. 





I know I saw at least a dozen Tri-Five Chevys in attendance.  On the left is a 1956 210, in the middle is a 1956 Nomad wagon, and on the right is an extensively modified 1955 Nomad wagon named "Lomad."  I've seen this magazine car at previous shows.





That 1956 Nomad wagon is quite rare being one of 7,886 made that year. 





Behind those cars sat a 1957 Bel Air and a 1955 210 Townsman wagon.





In front of the above 1955 210 Townsman wagon were two 1956 210 sedans, (there were a lot more 1956 Chevys gathered here than I typically see).  In front of them was a beautiful red and white 1955 Bel Air.





The gray/white car was done as a street rod.





The blue/white car is what I'll call a "survivor."  This term is applied to cars that are completely original, and have had no restoration work of any kind performed.  I particularly enjoy seeing this kind of car at shows.





The lack of any brightwork on the body suggests that the car shown below is a 1955 150 sedan.





In the photo below, the red car is a 1957 150 sedan, and the deep purple car is a 1955 150 sedan.


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« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2014, 01:23:09 AM »

I find old wagons really cool to begin with.  Seeing one with a couple of carbs sticking through the hood is just plain awesome !





I don't know any of the details about this 1963 Chevy II wagon, other than it is powered by a modified small block.  If I remember right, we'll get to hear this car run later also.





This is a 1964 Plymouth Barracuda, which was the introductory year for the car.





The car's base engine was Chrysler's 170 CID Slant-6.  The famous 225 CID Slant-6 was optional, as was a 180 hp 273 CID V-8.





The Plymouth Barracuda debuted on April 1, 1964, precisely 16 days before the Ford Mustang.  Unfortunately for Plymouth, sales of the Mustang were just a tad stronger, (23,443 Barracudas vs 121,538 Mustangs).  This particular car was very nicely restored.





Fast-forward 50 years to probably the most anticipated redesign of the year - the all-new 2014 C7 Chevrolet Corvette.





Fifty years ago, the above Barracuda had 180 hp, and would go zero to 60 mph in 12.9 seconds.  Today, the new Corvette's 6.2L V-8 makes 455 hp, allowing for a quarter-mile  time of 12.2 seconds.





Customer deliveries of the 2014 Corvette began in mid-September, which makes this car less than one month old.  I should have asked the car owner if the end result was worth the wait.





This 1965 Ford Galaxie 500 convertible was one of my favorites on that day.





I've always been attracted to specific cars for somewhat unusual reasons.  This is why I am the typical car sales person's worst nightmare.  In this case, I fell in love with this car because a) it's a great looking convertible, and b) it's a car that can actually be driven on a regular basis. 





Restoration parts are widely available, as are performance upgrades of all kinds.





I see it as a great looking old car that I could have a lot of fun with on a sunny day.


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« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2014, 10:00:23 PM »

I've seen this 2002 Camaro in the past. 





This is a heavily modified car powered by a twin turbo small-block. 





It also appears to be what I'll call a "continuous project."  I first saw this car at a Varsity show shortly after moving to Athens in 2009.  The display with the car indicated 382 cubes and 931 hp at the wheels. 


May 30, 2009



Fast forward to today where a few extra ponies have been discovered resulting in 1,010 hp at the wheels.





Contrary to popular belief, the "Four Barrel Carburetion, Four on the Floor, Dual exhaust" definition for Oldsmobile's "442" model name applies only  to the introductory year of 1964.  This is because there was no automatic transmission available that year.  When the auto became available beginning in 1965, the meaning of the name was changed to "400 Cubic Inch Displacement, Four Barrel Carburetion, Dual Exhaust."  According to this 442.com page, any references to the meaning of the 442 name were not used after 1965.  This makes sense considering in 1966, tripower carburetion (RPO L69) became available.  This car is a 1967 Olds 442 Holiday Hardtop, one of 16,998 produced. 





This particular car has the optional "Forced-Air" version of the 400 CID V-8 that makes 360 hp, (the dual snorkel air cleaner can be seen in the photo above).  Total 442 production numbered 24,833 cars in 3 body styles, (Holiday Hardtop, Sports Coupe, and Convertible).  Of that total, 7,661 Holiday Hardtops came with a 4-speed manual transmission. 


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« Reply #12 on: January 25, 2014, 12:36:14 AM »

The Volkswagen Beetle has been customized in just about every way imaginable over the last 7 decades.  This is one such example that has lost all of its fenders and roof.  I'm not really sure what to call this.  It seems to incorporate a lot of rat rod qualities .  .  .





Speaking of which, this Ford rat rod is Oldsmobile powered.





Actually, I'm not sure if this is a rat rod or just a work in progress.  The passenger side of the car was done in primer.  But the driver's side of the car was partially painted, which makes me wonder if this is a street rod in the making.





At first glance, this appears to be your average Ford Ranger with a set of aftermarket wheels.





Under the hood sits a massaged 347 CID Ford Stroker V-8 that makes 425 hp.  Talk about a sleeper !





The best thing about this truck is that someone put a lot of time into making this V8 Ranger look like Ford built it that way.  It's a tight fit.  But everything is very well done.


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Lone Fox
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« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2014, 04:27:14 PM »

ha, I want that Ranger
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Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #14 on: January 25, 2014, 09:46:40 PM »

The Plymouth 'Cuda is one of the most recognized names in the musclecar world.  The 1970-74 body style in particular has amassed an enormous following.  This 1971 'Cuda sports the "billboard" stripes and Shaker hood.





Under the Shaker sits the 390 hp 440 CID Six-Pack V-8.





This is a 4-speed car that has the familiar "Pistol Grip" Hurst shifter. 





According to this 'Cuda Production Numbers page on Anglefire, If this car was the real thing, it would be one of a mere 108 produced in 1971.  But it's actually a beautifully done tribute that started out life as a 383 4-bbl 'Cuda.





On a Mopar, the tag is read from the bottom up, and in this case, left tag to right tag.  This is a highly optioned car.  I am using code definitions from this mymopar.com page, and this nicksgarage.com page.  So, let's all take a deep breath .  .  .

bottom line, left hand tag 
E65 = engine:  383 CID V-8 with 4-bbl carburetor.
D21 = transmission:  heavy duty 4-speed manual.
BS23 N1B 116811 = the car's VIN number which breaks down as follows:  B=Barracuda, S='Cuda, 23=2 door hardtop, N=300 hp 383 4-bbl, 1=model year 1971, B=Hamtramck, Michigan assembly plant, 116811=sequence number.

next line upward 
FE5 = lower body paint:  Rallye Red, non-impact color
H6X9 = interior trim codes:  H=trim grade:  “high”, 6=style:  “vinyl bucket seats”, X9=color:  Black
000 = interior paint:  none (i.e. this car has full door panels)
908 = production date:  September 8, 1970
005206 = vehicle order number

next line upward (beginning of installed options) 
FE5 = upper body color:  Rallye Red, non-impact color, (i.e. not equipped with a vinyl roof)
U = market:  built for USA
A01 = Lighting package
A22 = Elastomeric colored front & rear bumper package
A62 = Rallye instrument cluster package
B51 = Power brakes

next line upward 
C16 = Console w/woodgrain panel
C55 = Bucket seats
G11 = Tinted glass (all)
G36 = Outside dual racing mirrors, painted
J25 = 3 speed wipers
J45 = Hood tie down pins

next line upward 
L25 = Trunk lamp
L31 = Hood/fender mounted turn signals
M21 = Roof drip rail moldings
M25 = Wide sill moldings
M31 = Belt and hood moldings

next line upward 
M88 = Decklid moldings treatment
N41 = Dual exhaust without tips
N42 = Chrome exhaust tips
N85 = Tachometer
N96 = Shaker air hood
CTD = continued on next tag 

options line on right hand tag, (VIN is shown on the bottom line) 
R21 = AM/FM Radio (5 1/2 Watts)
V6X = Black Longitudinal Stripes
26 = 26 inch radiator
EN2 = End of tag codes, assembly line 2.  According to this maxwedge.com page, Hamtramck plant tags used EN1 or EN2 depending on which assembly line the car was assembled, line 1 or line 2.

Next to the hardtop was an extremely rare 1971 'Cuda convertible.





I first saw this car back in 2011 at the Country Road Cruisers car show in Madison, Georgia.  The 4-letter word on the door stopped me in my tracks.





The 1971 Hemi 'Cuda convertible is the Holy Grail of the musclecar world.  Either 11 or 12 were produced (depending on which source you examine).  Of that total, only 7 were sold domestically, 2 4-speeds and 5 automatics.  Based on this alone, I had suspected this car to be a tribute. 





The Elephant is paired with the Mopar A727 Torqueflite automatic transmission.  If it were the real thing, it would be one of 5 with that combination.





I chatted with the car owner briefly who confirmed my suspicions.  “It was originally a 340 car,” he told me. 





Both cars are similarly equipped.  You know the drill .  .  .

bottom line, left hand tag 
E55 = engine:  275 hp 340 CID V-8 with 4 bbl carburetor
D32 = transmission:  A727 heavy duty automatic transmission
BS27 H1B 302112 = the car's VIN number which breaks down as follows:  B=Barracuda, S='Cuda, 27=convertible, H=340 4-bbl, 1=model year 1971, B=Hamtramck, Michigan assembly plant, 302112=sequence number.

next line upward 
EL5 = lower body paint:  Bahama Yellow, high impact color
SRX9 = interior trim codes:  S=trim grade:  “sport”, R=style:  “vinyl and leather bucket seats”, X9=color:  Black
000 = interior paint:  none (i.e. this car has full door panels)
222 = production date:  February 22, 1971
001229 = vehicle order number

next line upward (beginning of installed options) 
V3X = upper body color:  Black convertible top
U = market:  built for USA
A01 = Lighting package
A62 = Rallye instrument cluster package
B51 = Power brakes
C16 = Console w/woodgrain panel

next line upward 
C55 = Bucket seats
G11 = Tinted glass (all)
G36 = Outside dual racing mirrors, painted
J25 = 3 speed wipers
J45 = Hood tie down pins
J54 = Sport hood

next line upward 
L25 = Trunk lamp
L31 = Hood/fender mounted turn signals
M25 = Wide sill moldings
M31 = Belt and hood moldings
M88 = Decklid moldings treatment

next line upward 
N41 = Dual exhaust without tips
N42 = Chrome exhaust tips
N85 = Tachometer
R26 = AM radio with cassette
V6X = Black Longitudinal Stripes
CTD = continued on next tag

options line on right hand tag, (VIN is shown on the bottom line) 
26 = 26 inch radiator
EN2 = End of tag codes, assembly line 2.

Technically, we’re not actually looking at a pair of rare big-block Mopars including an original 1971 Hemi 'Cuda convertible that is worth well into the 7 figures.  But, both of these cars are beautifully restored tributes that are completely authentic in every other way, (and worth a small fortune).  The Hemi engine in the convertible by itself is worth 5 figures .  .  .
« Last Edit: January 25, 2014, 09:56:24 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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