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Author Topic: East Athens Baptist Church car show, October 5, 2013 . . .  (Read 18628 times)
Oldcarsarecool
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« on: December 08, 2013, 03:30:40 PM »

East Athens Baptist Church car show .  .  .  
October 5, 2013





My night-shift counterpart from the Rental Department, Jamie, likes to keep up with local car show news.  He will often ask me if I'm going to "X" show over the weekend.  In that sense, there is a lot of news to keep up with around here.  Shows in this part of the country are plentiful right through to the end of the year.

"There's a show out your way on Saturday," was his comment to me during that evening back in October.  I'm about two miles from the East Athens Baptist Church, actually.  Being that close, I had to visit and take a look around.





I parked next to a couple of classics.





The red 1962 Chevy Impala encountered a small "oops" somewhere along the line, but still looked great, as did the 1967 Ford Fairlane.  My photo, as has been the case lately, didn't fare as well.  I'll figure this picture-taking thing out eventually.





The show, itself, was rather small, but featured a great array of machinery.  A nice group of early John Deere tractors caught my eyes, and ears first.





I know nothing about antique tractors.  Looking at the photo above beginning at the left, the first tractor is a 1935 Model A, as indicated on the display card.  





Some brief research seems to indicate that all are from this general time period.  The next two are also Model As, (this name was painted near the driver's seat).  The fourth tractor is a 1937 Model B, which is the smaller companion to the Model A.  I'm not sure about the last tractor.  I want to call it a Model A as well, but really have no idea.  I do know they were all beautifully restored.  And, they all ran !


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFwa8DF4eIU" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XFwa8DF4eIU</a>


The Model A was produced from 1934 - 1952.  Early versions featured a massive 5.1L TWO-CYLINDER   engine, (5.5 inch bore x 6.5 inch stroke !).  The Model B was produced from 1935 - 1952, and featured a smaller 2.4L two-cylinder engine from 1935 - 1938.  


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Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2013, 03:46:50 PM »

Next to the tractors sat a 1955 Chevy Bel Air in a nice color combination. 





Under the hood sat a small-block V-8 with three 2-bbl carbs.





The matching interior was beautiful.  It's a 4-speed ! 





Next was a 1958 Chevy Impala convertible. 





I'm not really familiar with the low-rider aspect of the hobby.  But I can certainly appreciate the work that goes into something like this.





The work done on this car looked pretty nice.





Rounding out this group of GM products was this unusual 1965 GMC "Rat Rod" pickup.





It's big-block powered !  The display card listed it as having a 402 CID V-8 and Turbo 350 transmission.


« Last Edit: December 08, 2013, 03:48:41 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2013, 11:46:26 PM »

I love the color on this 1937 Ford !





Whoever did the body work and paint did a fantastic job.





Details of the 1934 Chevrolet beside the Ford can clearly be seen.





The reflection made for a nice selfie .  .  .





I've photographed this 1962 Chevrolet Biscayne many times in the past.  The two-door post sedan body, non-threatening paint, painted steelies, and dog-dish hubcaps make for the perfect sleeper.





You can see in the video below from October 9, 2011 that there is a W-motor under the hood.  I don't know, however, the displacement of such, or if this is an original 409 car.  I can confirm that whatever it is sounds awesome ! 


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQ8fAwDroOY" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQ8fAwDroOY</a>


It's a 4-speed car with a bench seat.





The car owner has also installed some kind of vacuum operated valve that opens and closes the exhaust from inside the car.





More Bowtie muscle in the form of a beautiful 1955 Chevrolet Bel Air two-door sedan.  The paint looks great !





Next to the '55 sat an extensively customized 1956 Chevrolet Bel Air two-door hardtop.





Among the many modifications is a 502 CID big-block V-8 under the hood.





I give someone credit for paying attention to the details when designing this underhood area.  It's beautiful !  But, I suspect that it's also quite difficult to keep clean.





The beautiful paint and spotless engine compartment are complimented by a custom interior.  I really like the "tubular" approach to both the center console and door arm rests.


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Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2013, 12:44:35 AM »

If you've browsed through some of my other car show pics, you may get the impression that I like "unusual" and "different."  Sure, the high-dollar concours cars are beautiful, as are the Ridler Award winners.  They draw the big crowds all the time.  My taste is a little different, and at times very hard to define.  Thinking along those lines, this 1966 Chevrolet Impala SS hardtop was my favorite car from that day.





It's not a particularly rare car, (more than 119,000 were produced in 1966).  It's not even a 427 car.  Power comes from a 300 hp 327 CID small-block V-8. 





On the inside, this car has the rally gauges, a/c, and Powerglide automatic transmission.





Let's take a look at the trim tag.





Starting at the top:
03A = production date:  First week of March.
ST 66-16837 = 1966 Impala SS V-8 hardtop coupe.
BA04930BODY = assembly plant, (BA - Doraville, Georgia), and Fisher Body sequence number.
TR 830 = interior trim:  Green vinyl bucket seats.
HC PAINT = exterior paint codes:  Willow Green (lower) and Ermine White (upper).  I'm not sure about this only because the car doesn't have two-tone paint, (I don't know if I've ever seen a '66 Impala with two-tone paint).  I have seen plenty of GM cars where the body is painted one color and the roof another.  So these codes could mean that the roof may have originally been Ermine White.  More research is needed.

Notice the small drilled hole immediately next to the "B" in Body by Fisher at the bottom center of the tag.  This indicates that the car has mounting provisions for the optional shoulder harness.

So why was this car my favorite of the day ?  For whatever reason, this car spoke to me.  Chevy's fastback styling has always been a favorite of mine.  I love the Willow Green exterior with matching green interior.  I also like the fact that this appears to be a nice original car that can actually be driven, which is what I would do with it .  .  .
« Last Edit: December 09, 2013, 12:51:41 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2013, 01:55:32 AM »

I've seen the Bones, Durbach, Pisano 1933 Willys at other shows in this area.  It's a wonderful tribute that is street driven !    Yes, there is tread on those rear tires.





I don't know any of the specifics on the Hemi in this car, other than it is a work of art.





The original car in this configuration would have been powered by a 465 CID Hemi V-8.  This excerpt from the October 2001 issue of Hot Rod Magazine gives you an idea of what life with this monster was like .  .  .

Quote
As graphic illustration of the Hemi’s capability, we offer this anecdote. In 1964, Bones Balogh and Gary Dubach’s ’33 Willys eventually ran 143 with a 364-inch Chevy. When third partner Joe Pisano offered to poke it with a 465-inch Hemi, there was celebration, but in fact the car wasn’t ready for the tectonic influx. It snapped six axles in a single day of testing. Then, at Lions, an axle sheared at the hub, and Bones rode the ’33 sideways into a pole. Six months later, their new (2,800-pound) ’33 ripped off a 9.38 at 155 mph. 

That same article mentions that Bones was making around 850 hp at 15 pounds of boost from the blower.





Whether you're standing in front of it or looking at a reflection of it in the side of the 1955 Chevy pickup next to it, the blown Hemi is a beautiful sight.





Actually, the whole car is absolutely stunning.





That 1955 Chevy 3100 Series pickup mentioned above was finished in a beautiful dark blue.





Whoever did the body and paint work did a great job !





The half-ton pickup was called the 3100 Series, (the 3/4-ton and 1-ton trucks were called the 3200 Series and 3600 Series, respectively). 





Chevrolet actually produced two different pickup trucks for the 1955 model year.  The first batch of 1955s were direct carry-overs from 1954.  They represented the last of the "Advance Design" series that debuted in 1947.  This particular truck is an example of the new "Task Force" series that made its debut in late 1955. 


« Last Edit: December 14, 2013, 01:34:27 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2013, 03:34:33 PM »

Now that I am posting these pics, I see where a majority of the participants featured a Bowtie on the grill.  This is a 1967 Chevelle SS396.





This was another beauty with great body and paint work.





I love the old warning labels !





I didn't pay attention to the trim tag other than to see if this car was an original SS396, (style code 13817), which it was.  However, a 502 CID big-block V-8 now sits in the engine bay where the original 396 used to be.





I used to see Chevy Novas all over the place when I was younger.  A lot of the people I hung out with had one.  I remember a friend, Mike, having one that was pea-green and bone stock.  Mike was really excited when he was going to install his newly acquired 283 small-block, but was not nearly as excited with the end result.  So he saved his pennies and bought a built 350 and better gears for the rear end.  Problem solved.  My neighbor 2 blocks away, Joe, had one and went through the same scenario - stock to modified to much better modified.  Another friend from school, Jay, had one with a built V-8 (can't remember if it was a big or small-block), powerglide, and 4.88 gears !  This was definitely not a car for interstate speeds !  But it would snap your neck getting to that point.

Not so much any more.  I just don't see them around.  Of course, as hard as it is for me to believe, these memories are from 30 years ago,  which explains a lot.

This red beauty is a tastefully modified 1972 Chevrolet Nova 2-door sedan.  Power comes from a 350 CID small-block V-8 and Turbo 350 transmission.





This is another Chevelle SS396, a 1966 model.





On this car, I did pay attention to the trim tag.





Starting at the top .  .  .
~  01D  =  build date:  4th week of January 1966.
~  ST 66-13817  =  style code:  1966 Chevelle Malibu SS Hardtop Coupe.
~  ATL 4735 BODY  =  assembly plant info:  Atlanta, Georgia and Fisher Body sequence number.
~  TR 732-A  =  trim codes:  medium bright blue bench seat.
~  F-F PAINT  =  exterior paint codes:  Marina Blue lower and upper.
~  stamped "5" in the center of the tag  =  final inspection stamp.

Group option codes:
~  Group 1:  W  =  tinted windshield.
    Group 2:   L  =  M20 4-speed manual transmission.
                  S  =  rear antenna. 
                  R  =  rear speaker. 

~  The meaning of the "L" below the group option codes is currently unknown.  Chevellestuff.net describes it as "uncertain", but also states that it is definitely not part of the group option codes.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2013, 01:11:23 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2013, 03:21:25 PM »

This is a 1965 Chevy Impala SS convertible finished in a great Regal Red color !





This is another 1966 Chevelle SS396 in the same Regal Red exterior color.





Unlike the blue '66 from above, this car is actually a V-8 Malibu with SS trim.





Starting at the top:
~  02B  =  build date:  2nd week of February 1966.
~  "13" stamped on the top right  =  final inspection stamp.
~  ST 66-13617  =  style code:  1966 Chevelle Malibu V-8 hardtop coupe.
~  ATL 7518 BODY  =  assembly plant:  Atlanta, Georgia and Fisher Body sequence code.
~  TR 761-A  =  trim codes:  Black Imitation Leather bench seat.
~  R-R PAINT  =  exterior paint codes:  Regal Red lower and upper.

Group Option codes:
~ Group 2:  S  =  Rear antenna.

The "L" below the 2S option is the same as above - "uncertain," but not part of the Group Options.
The small hole to the left of "Body By Fisher" at the bottom of the tag indicates that this car has mounting provisions for the optional shoulder harness.

This 1955 Chevrolet 210 2-door sedan was very well done.





And finally, I came across something a little smaller than usual.





The Legends Racing series was born at the Charlotte Motor Speedway in Charlotte, North Carolina.  Noticing a drop in participation, track officials asked the familiar question, "how do we get more people involved in racing ?"  Track President "Humpy" Wheeler and road racer Elliott Forbes-Robinson liked the idea of a "spec" racing series, (i.e. all cars are mechanically identical), that would be open to participants of every skill level and didn't require a large investment of time and money in order to have fun. 

Ernie Adams and Daren Schmaltz's Dwarf Car racing series had already been around for a decade by this time.  The Dwarf Car Company of Phoenix, AZ was manufacturing a 5/8-scale steel-bodied replica of a 1934 Ford Coupe powered by a motorcycle engine.  Using this as a starting point, Wheeler and Forbes-Robinson made a few modifications (the biggest of which was a change to a fiberglass body with full fenders), drafted a set of rules, and unveiled the Legends Racing series in April 1992. 

The original idea was to make racing affordable for the average person.  Today, a complete turn-key Legends car can be had from US Legend Cars International for less than $15k.  Power comes from a sealed Yamaha FJ1250 motorcycle engine that makes 122 hp.  But it only has to move 1,300 pounds (including the driver).  Performance is, shall we say .  .  . spirited.  This is the #23 Legends car of Lamar Adams.





Thanks for reading .  .  .
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MontereyDave
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« Reply #7 on: December 15, 2013, 11:15:50 PM »

That selfie was a great pic, Todd.  I like that 66 Impala SS, too.  I know 64 seems garner more attention but I prefer the looks of 65-66 and 61-62.
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Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #8 on: December 15, 2013, 11:47:44 PM »

Thanks Dave !  I've always liked the looks of the 1965-66 Impala as well .  .  .
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