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Author Topic: Cruise-In at The Varsity, Athens, GA, August 3, 2013 . . .  (Read 18031 times)
Oldcarsarecool
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« on: November 16, 2013, 05:59:09 PM »

I'm starting get caught up as far as posting the multitude of car show pics from this summer is concerned.  It's a time consuming adventure.  But I know I'm making progress when I actually get show pics from 2013 posted in 2013.  This round will take me to August 3, and another edition of the monthly Cruise-In at The Varsity in Athens, Georgia.





A great way to start each month .  .  .  
August 3, 2013





I got the Jag all cleaned up, paid my $5 entry fee, and took my place among the other cars.  These shows generally aren't as crowded as the annual Mack Evans Memorial Car Show held each November.  I arrived early enough to get a space right up front.  








You don't realize just how dirty your car is until you enter a show and start noticing the details.  The Jag isn't a "show car" by any stretch of the imagination.  But I do try and keep it clean.  The front bumper and lower valance seem to attract a lot of bugs around here.





I have to be careful with the interior, especially if I take the car to work.  Things like motor oil, brake dust, and chassis grease can do bad things to a light-colored tan interior.





Let the show begin .  .  .


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« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2013, 06:13:52 PM »

Parked next to me was a new Camaro SS that has had a lot of custom work done.





This may not be my style, but the workmanship on this car was top notch.  A lot of attention was paid to the small details.





Across from me sat "The Boss."





"The Boss" is a heavily modified 1977 Ford Mustang II. 





And by "heavily modified," I'm referring to this.





The hood sums things up nicely.





We'll get to hear the .060 over 460 run later.





I managed to snap a few pics of this suicide-door 1964 Lincoln Continental before it pulled out of the parking lot. 





I've seen this car at other local shows.  The blue exterior, while not a factory shade, looks great on this car.  I love the car, but I'm not the biggest fan of aftermarket wheels. 





The 1961 - 69 suicide door Lincolns are among my all-time favorite cars.





This 1961 Corvette looked beautiful. I appreciate the stock aspect of the restoration.


« Last Edit: December 01, 2013, 11:15:42 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2013, 01:15:50 AM »

The DeLorean DMC-12 looked like a winner on paper.  The beautiful Giorgetto Giugiaro designed body featured gullwing doors and stainless steel body panels.  If anything, it was definitely unique.  The DeLorean Motor Company was formed in 1975 to bring the car to reality.

Problems surfaced quickly and decisively.  Founder John DeLorean was hoping for 200 hp, but got an underwhelming 130 hp instead.  DeLorean purchased the rights to a new technology known as Elastic Reservoir Moulding (ERM) and intended to utilize the process to build the DMC-12's chassis.  It was later discovered that this process wasn't feasible for the production timeline that was in place.  This lead to a complete redesign of the car by Lotus founder Colin Chapman.  Production that was supposed to begin in 1979 didn't actually get under way until 1981.

On the road, the results were typical early 1980s.  It was slow, (zero to 60 mph in around 10.5 seconds).  It was expensive, (the $25k MSRP in 1981 translates to more than $62k in today's money).  But it was still unique.  The orders that arrived at the Northern Ireland factory looked promising.

Approximately 9,200 DeLoreans were manufactured for the 1981 - 83 model years before DeLorean ran out of money and fell into receivership.  Drug trafficking charges filed against John DeLorean in 1982 didn't help the situation despite the fact that he was found not guilty by reason of being entrapped by the FBI.  But it was too late by then.

According to several sources I examined, approximately 6,500 DeLorean DMC-12s are still around.  A tremendous amount of support exists in the form of the new DeLorean Motor Company founded by Stephen Wynne in 1997.  The Humble, Texas company not only owns the rights to the company logo, it also was was able to acquire the entire parts inventory.  Your original DeLorean can be completely "remanufactured" using NOS parts.  "New" DeLoreans are also available for purchase, (i.e. a car with an original 1981 - 83 VIN that is rebuilt using NOS parts).





The Street Rod aspect of the hobby appears to be quite popular in this area.  I've seen a lot of nice rat rods and street rods at local shows, with this Ford being one of them.





After several years of being a separate model with its own style code, the 442 reverted back to being an option package in 1972.  This means that there is no way to verify a genuine 442 via the trim tag or VIN number, (the exception to this is if the engine code in the VIN is an "X" indicating the W-30 455, which indicates a 442 by default).





This 1972 Olds 442 convertible is a regular at local car shows.  As of this writing, the car is for sale.  I want to say the asking price is somewhere in the low $20k range, but I'm not sure.





The Plymouth AAR 'Cuda and Dodge Challenger T/A were born for the 1970 model year specifically to qualify the cars for the SCCA Trans Am racing series.  Production cars came equipped with the 290 hp 340 CID V-8 with 3-2 bbl carburetors.  Approximately 2,724 AAR 'Cudas were produced for 1970 only, making this Lime Light Green example quite rare.


« Last Edit: December 01, 2013, 10:58:35 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2013, 02:14:42 AM »

This is a 1963 Chevrolet Impala SS convertible in an awesome color.  The car looked beautifully restored, and was one of my favorites on that day.  The stock restoration was very well done.





It's also a factory 4-speed car !  Something about rowing through the gears in a full-sized car always makes me smile.





At first glance, this appears to be a 1967 Cadillac Deville convertible that, other than the obvious lowering, appears to be pretty stock.  The only problem is that Cadillac didn't make a 4-door convertible in 1967, and hadn't done so since the last Series 62 convertible sedan rolled off the assembly line in 1941.





My guess is that this car started off as a Calais or Sedan de Ville hardtop.  One encounter with a sawzall later, the car became not necessarily a "convertible," (i.e. an open car with a folding canvas roof), but rather a hardtop without a roof at all.  It also looks like the original 340 hp 429 CID V-8 that would normally be found under the hood has been replaced with either a 472 or 500 CID V-8.  I suspect the block of lines is for whatever method of "lowering" has been installed.





Some custom work has been done to the interior as well.  While not my style, I would call this conversion quite tasteful overall.


« Last Edit: November 29, 2013, 11:49:48 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2013, 12:51:26 AM »

I've seen this 1955 Chevy Bel Air 2-door sedan at other local shows.  Personally, I really like the flames.





I also like the small-block V-8 with 2-4 bbl carbs sticking up through the hood.





I don't know anything about it as far as displacement or other specs are concerned.  But under the hood was nicely detailed.  It's got a/c !





A beautiful, tastefully done street rod.


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« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2013, 12:44:37 AM »

Pickup trucks have been part of Ford's lineup since the days of the Model T.  However, the truck known as the "F-Series" didn't arrive until 1948.  The F-Series was Ford's first pickup that utilized its own specifically designed chassis, (previous pickups were based on the existing car chassis).  The new F-Series was available in a wide range of weight classes, with the model designations of each initiating what is now a pretty familiar pattern.  The 1/2 ton pickup was called the F-1, the 3/4 ton was the F-2, the heavy duty 3/4 ton was the F-3, and the 1-ton model was called the F-4.  Buyers looking for a medium or heavy duty commercial truck could select models labeled F-5, (GVW of 10,000 pounds), through F-8, (GVW up to 22,000 pounds).

Today's show featured two beautifully done first generation F-Series street rods.





The copper F-Series is Chevrolet powered.





The yellow F-Series, however, is Ford powered.





Next to the Fords is 1954 Chevrolet Series 3100 half-ton pickup.  That particular grill design is unique to the 1954 model year. 





All three were quite nice.





« Last Edit: December 07, 2013, 07:04:07 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2013, 01:26:17 AM »

Ford did fastback styling very well back in the day.  Cars like this 1968 Galaxie 500 look great from any angle.  This is the kind of car I really enjoy seeing at a show.  Not a perfect show car, but one that is original and shows normal wear and tear from being driven, like it was meant to be.  Oddly enough, this was also one of my favorites on this day.  Something about this car spoke to me .  .  .





This 1968 Plymouth GTX convertible is quite a rare machine.





I'm having trouble understanding the production numbers I am finding.  Several sources indicate a total of 1,026 GTX convertibles were made in 1968.  The only problem is that the breakdown numbers typically shown with that figure don't add up to 1,026.  According to Mopar authority Galen Govier, 917 GTX convertibles were "shipped" in 1968.  His numbers add up.  So, that's what I'm going to go with here.

The reason why this is so important is because of what sits under the hood of this particular car.





That would be the mighty 426 Hemi.  If this car is the real thing, it would be one of only 36 made that year, and worth an easy 6 figures.  So let's take a look at the fender tag and see what we can learn.





On a Mopar, the fender tag is read from the bottom up.  On the bottom row:
R = car line:  Plymouth "B" body, (i.e. Belvedere or Satellite)
P = price class:  premium
27 = body style:  convertible

This tells us that we are looking at a Plymouth Satellite convertible.  The different models within the same car line were assigned class designations based on the level of equipment and the corresponding price point.  For example, the Dodge Coronet line was assigned the line code "W."  The W line contained a WL (low priced base Coronet), a WM (medium priced Coronet Super Bee), a WH (high priced Coronet 440), a WP (premium price Coronet 500), and a WS (special model Coronet R/T). The "S" price class was mainly used for special high performance models of a particular car line.  If we were looking at a GTX convertible, the code on the tag would be RS27.  This tag shows a "P" which indicates a Satellite. 

On a side note, if you ever encounter a Mopar with a price class code "O," you have found an extremely rare Super Stock factory lightweight race car.  Roughly 50 BO23 Barracudas and 80 LO23 Darts were produced with a race-ready cross-ram Hemi under the hood in 1968.

Anyways, continuing on the bottom row:
41 = engine code:  318 CID V-8 with a 2 bbl carburetor
5 = transmission code:  3-speed automatic
33 = tire code:  7.35 x 14 white sidewall
818 = scheduled production date:  August 18, 1967.  Model year production usually began at the beginning of August, making this a very early build car.
188111 = vehicle shipping number.

The next two rows upward begin a different code identification pattern.  Each code is formed by a series of two numbers with one sitting directly below the other.  The individual numbers get paired with the number under which they sit.

The heading labeled 1 through 8 and the numbers below them represent moldings:   
9 sitting below 1 = code 19:  wide sill moldings
0 sitting below 3 = code 30:  body belt moldings
8 sitting under 7 = code 78:  wheel lip moldings

This pattern continues for the rest of the tag information.  The heading "AX" represents the axle:
1 sitting below A = code A1:  This is the axle ratio - 2.76
blank space below X = this car is not equipped with Chrysler's Sure Grip differential, (Sure Grip cars would have an 8 under the X).

The next heading "TRM" represents the interior trim codes:
P sitting below T = trim grade:  premium trim
6 sitting below R = seating code:  vinyl bucket seats
F sitting below M = color code:  green

The next heading "PNT" represents the paint codes:
T sitting below P = upper body color:  Avacado Green Metallic
T sitting below N = lower body color:  Avacado Green Metallic
1 sitting below T = paint style:  monotone paint

The next heading "UBS" represents additional body appearance codes:
G sitting below U = upper door frame color:  Forest Green Metallic
blank space below B = not equipped with buffed paint
8 sitting below S = stripe code:  stripe delete

The next rows upward represent optional equipment.  One heading is in upper case letters, and the other heading is in lower case letters.
4 sitting below C = C4:  Unknown.  The number is supposed to represent the last digit of the sales code for that particular option.  Whatever it is, I can't find it.
1 sitting below R = code R1:  AM radio
0 sitting below Y = code Y0:  green convertible top
4 sitting below b = code b4:  bucket seats

It may not be the real thing.  But it is a beautifully restored Mopar convertible with an authentic 426 Hemi under the hood.  I'll call it a "tribute car" .  .  .
« Last Edit: November 29, 2013, 11:54:52 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2013, 04:03:18 PM »

Few vehicle names are more recognizable than Jeep.  The no-nonsense workhorse that "helped win the war" received that designation because of what military personnel thought of the Jeep throughout WWII.  It could go almost anywhere, and was practically unstoppable in the process.

According to the Auto Editors of the Consumer Guide, the idea of a four wheel drive utility vehicle can be traced back to the turn of the 20th century.  Colonel Albert Pope and his Electric Vehicle Company produced a 5-ton commercial truck powered by four electric motors, one linked to each wheel via a chain drive system.  Little by little, development of the four wheel drive concept continued.  

The Four Wheel Drive Auto Company, founded in 1909, is credited with developing the double-Y universal joint which allowed for steering and power delivery to be present at a wheel simultaneously.  The Thomas B. Jeffery Company began producing a "Quadruple-Drive Truck," (or more commonly, the Quad), for the US Army.  Marmon-Herrington began producing the Command Car and companion Weapons Carrier in the years leading up to WWII.  

The commonality between all of these vehicles was the fact that they were all based on heavy duty commercial trucks.  The military wanted to take this go-anywhere concept and apply it to something extremely light and maneuverable.  Auto industry reps were asked to look into the idea.

Frank Fenn, president of the small Butler, Pennsylvania based American Bantam Car Company, saw an opportunity to save his company from bankruptcy.  Fenn enlisted the services of Detroit engineer Karl Probst to design the new vehicle.  The rest, as is often said, is history.

The Jeep's military career was so well known that Willys-Overland, (who, along with Ford, had assembled military Jeeps during the war), started thinking about producing a civilian version of the Jeep once the war ended.  The famous Jeep CJ Series, (or Civilian Jeep), was produced in different iterations from 1945 through 1986.  Shown below is a beautifully restored Jeep CJ-5.





The rounded fenders identify this Jeep as a CJ-5, produced from 1954 to 1983.  I'm not sure of the exact year.  But I believe it is a pre-1969 model.  The lack of side marker lamps in the front fenders eliminates models built after 1968.





Power comes from the Willys "Hurricane" I-4 engine that makes around 75 hp.  The Hurricane replaced the Willys "Go Devil" I-4 that had powered the military and early civilian Jeeps.  





This Jeep was beautifully restored and detailed, and was awarded one of the "Best in Cruise" plaques at the conclusion of this event.


« Last Edit: November 29, 2013, 12:01:21 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #8 on: November 25, 2013, 12:51:28 AM »

Having owned one for 15 years, it's easy to understand why the 1965 Cadillac will always be a favorite of mine.  This car is a Coupe de Ville.





Like the '68 Galaxie 500 from earlier, this Caddy shows the normal wear and tear associated with being driven.  It also looks like the stance has been lowered somewhat.





Great car !  Makes me miss mine even more .  .  .





This is an exceptionally clean looking 1932 Ford street rod.  I especially love the color combination and painted steelies with dog-dish hubcaps.





This particular car was featured in Street Rodder magazine.





Plymouth produced just a little under 6,300 'Cuda 340 coupes and convertibles in 1970.  This nicely restored example features a number of familiar options such as the Hockey Stick stripes, Shaker hood, and Plum Crazy Purple paint. 





The stripes on the rear of the car were referred to as the "hockey stick" stripes because of their resemblance to such. 





« Last Edit: November 29, 2013, 12:02:58 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #9 on: November 29, 2013, 10:14:53 PM »

This 1955 Ford Thunderbird is a regular at local car shows.





In the photo below, the truck on the left is another 1st generation Ford F-Series.  Unlike the two seen earlier (which were 1948 - 50 models), this truck is either a 1951 or 1952.  Next is 1959 Corvette.  After that is a 1940 Plymouth.





This is a pair of Chevrolet Bel Airs, a 1956 model on the left, and a 1955 model on the right.





This appears to be a rather unassuming 1957 Oldsmobile 88.





It's a beautiful car, both inside and out.





But what made this car another of my favorites on that day was the fact that the completely stock exterior has been fitted with a modern Corvette drivetrain complete with a/c.  In other words, it's a classic that is completely driveable and reliable.  Wonderful car !





And finally, the "win on Sunday, sell on Monday" world of NASCAR clearly illustrates the relationship between winning races and the resulting effect on sales.  Manufacturers were aware of this phenomenon and invested a lot of time and money in making the cars go faster.  The obvious place to start was under the hood.  NASCAR officials encouraged improvements and advances as long as what was being raced on Sunday was actually sitting in the showrooms on Monday.  This is why the production 426 Hemi from Chrysler exists in the first place.

In the late 1960s, Ford was competitive, but by no means dominant.  Engineers realized that drivetrain improvements could only go so far.  This lead to the exploration of a new avenue - aerodynamics.  In a nutshell, higher speeds could be attained with the existing drivetrain by making a few changes the car body, which currently sailed through the wind about as efficiently as a brick wall.



From Sports Car Digest, click for the article.


The recessed grill of the Ford Torino shown above was replaced with a longer wedge shaped flush mounted design.  The existing front bumper was replaced with a modified rear  bumper that also served as an air dam.  In a bit of "how-far-can-we-bend-the-rules" engineering, Ford reshaped the rocker panels of the car in a manner that allowed the car's ride height to be lowered by almost one inch and still be within NASCAR's rules.  The results were impressive  -  29 Grand National race wins, the 1969 NASCAR Manufacturer's Championship, and the 1969 ARCA Manufacturer's Championship. 

Roughly 751 Torino Talladegas were produced for 1969.  All came with the 428 CID "Cobra Jet" V-8 and C6 automatic transmission.  Only three colors were available:  Wimbledon White, Royal Maroon, and Presidential Blue shown below.  Sources indicate 199 cars were finished in Presidential Blue, making this car extremely rare.



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« Reply #10 on: November 30, 2013, 05:45:24 PM »

And as is customary, I was able to capture a few good sound bites of some of the machinery present.  I recommend a good set of headphones.


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cx44eQ2dlwA" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cx44eQ2dlwA</a>


Thanks for reading .  .  .
« Last Edit: November 30, 2013, 11:30:31 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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