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Author Topic: Crystal Hills Memorial Day Car Show, Athens, GA, May 27, 2013 . . .  (Read 18532 times)
Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #15 on: November 02, 2013, 12:34:59 AM »

I passed by a few more really nice Fords.  This beautiful 1955 Ford Thunderbird is a regular at local car shows.   





Ford began using the name "Sunliner" for it's soft-top convertible models in 1952.  The Sunliner was part of the upscale Crestline series from 1952 - 1954.  Beginning in 1955, the upper level series became the Fairlane.  In 1957, the soft-top Sunliner was joined by the "Skyliner" retractable hardtop convertible within the Fairlane 500 series.  For 1959, the two drop-tops were moved to the Galaxie series.  Almost 48,000 Skyliner retractable hardtop convertibles were produced between 1957 - 1959.  This 1959 Skyliner is the rarest of the three years with 12,915 produced.





Looks can definitely be deceiving.  As expected, the trunk on the Skyliner was downright huge in order to accommodate the hardtop roof.  However, with the roof lowered, available luggage space was reduced to little more than that of a laundry hamper.


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« Reply #16 on: November 02, 2013, 12:57:44 AM »

Athens BMW was one of the sponsors of this event, and displayed a new M5.





The blue "M" calipers are pretty cool ! 





Also representing the modern era was this 3rd generation Dodge Viper SRT-10.





Power comes from a massive 8.3L V-10 that makes 500 hp.





The 3rd generation Viper was produced from 2003 - 2006.  The 500 hp generated by the 505 CID V-10 was good enough for a high - 11 second quarter mile.


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Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #17 on: November 02, 2013, 11:47:53 PM »

The Peach State Cadillac LaSalle Club was represented by several really nice old Cadillacs.  I like the "vintage" color on this 1955 Fleetwood.





The giant Coupe de Ville has always been a favorite.  For 1977, Cadillac began its downsizing across the line, making this 1976 Coupe de Ville the last of the giants.





This 1961 Sedan de Ville is a 33k original mile example that was described as having 95% original paint.








Like many cars from the days of old, there was enough room in the back seat to accommodate persons of every size.  I used to tell people years ago that if I would ever come home with another car, my wife would make me sleep in it.  This is one in which you could not only do such a thing, but do it quite comfortably !





Cadillac always did a great job with the interior of its cars.  This 1961, (like my 1965 from many years ago), featured lots of chrome and actual metal in its design.





You can see how times have changed when you compare the above photo of a 1961 dash to that of the 1989 Cadillac Allante that was parked next to it.





Sitting next to the Allante was a beautiful 1956 Coupe de Ville that I've seen at shows previously. 





Behind the '56 was a 1958 Series 62 sedan.





From its introduction in 1953 through 1966, the Cadillac Eldorado was a rear wheel drive car.  From 1953 - 1958, it was actually part of the Series 62 lineup.  Beginning in 1959, the Eldorado became a separate model.  Sales were limited in these years.  The introductory year of 1953 saw only 532 Eldorados produced.  Peak production occurred in 1955 with 3,950 produced.  The reason for this was due to simple economics.  The Eldorado was based on, and bore a strong resemblance to it's Series 62 convertible stablemate at a price that was usually $1,500 - $2,000 more expensive.

This 1964 Eldorado is one of a mere 1,870 produced that year.  I love this color !





This car was beautiful, and one of my favorites of the day.





This 1958 Mercury Park Lane was also part of the PSCLC group.  Mercury's lineup for 1958 changed slightly over that of 1957.  The entry level Medalist, mid-level Montery, and slightly more mid-level Montclair returned for 1958.  What was the Turnpike Cruiser in 1957, (i.e. the top-of-the-line Mercury), became the Park Lane for 1958.  The Turnpike Cruiser name was still used, but on a sub-model of the Montclair series.





Ford's styling from that era, although contemporary, was never well-received, (thanks in part to Edsel).  The truth is that Ford was no better or worse than anyone else in its styling approach.





The late 1950s auto industry was "gadget happy," as evidenced by the push button automatic transmission.





The rest of the interior was typical 1950s chrome and brightwork, something I really like.


« Last Edit: November 08, 2013, 10:03:24 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

Lone Fox
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« Reply #18 on: November 03, 2013, 06:38:09 AM »

Love those old Cadillacs
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MontereyDave
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« Reply #19 on: November 03, 2013, 09:17:17 AM »

The Peach State Cadillac LaSalle Club was represented by several really nice old Cadillacs.
...



...

Check out the crazy home-style configuration of that cassette tape player!
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Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #20 on: November 04, 2013, 01:35:52 AM »

Love those old Cadillacs


They are among my favorites.  I'll own another one someday .  .  .





Check out the crazy home-style configuration of that cassette tape player!


I noticed that !  I remember the early days of automobile cassette players when "eating the tape" was common.  This setup may have been beneficial .  .  .
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« Reply #21 on: November 09, 2013, 12:00:54 AM »

The full-size Pontiacs are always a favorite.  This 1962 Grand Prix may not have been one of the 178 Super Duty cars produced that year with an aluminum front end and the fire-breathing 421 under the hood. 





But it was an 88k original mile 2-door GP in a great color.





This row had a bunch of really nice (and familiar) Chevrolets.  The 1962 Biscayne on the left is a 4-speed car powered by a really healthy-sounding 409 CID V-8.  The blue 1956 is a mid-level 210 model.  Both 1955s are Bel Airs. 





Next to the Chevys sat a couple of rare Shelby Mustangs.  The 1968 GT500KR on the left is one of 1,053 produced that year.  The 1967 GT500 on the right is one of 2.050 produced. 





This is a 1969 Jaguar XKE Series II.  In order to comply with federal regulations, Series I XKEs (1961 - 1967), got revised bumpers, side marker lights, and lost the enclosed headlamps, thus becoming the Series II.  It was, however, still absolutely stunning to behold .  .  .


« Last Edit: November 09, 2013, 12:16:35 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #22 on: November 09, 2013, 12:32:32 AM »

And now, I present The Grande Dame of the Show." 





This 1940 Ford Deluxe Opera Coupe has quite a resume of film credits.





The Grande Dame also has a few surprises in store for the unsuspecting viewer.





I like the "security system."


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« Reply #23 on: November 10, 2013, 12:56:06 AM »

Industrialist Sir David Brown began his career in industry working in the family business, David Brown Ltd.  Originally founded by his grandfather in 1860 as a patterns manufacturer, endeavors shifted to gear and bearing manufacturing in 1873.  By the turn of the 20th century, the company was building complete gear systems and worm-drive gear units.  Brown became Managing Director in 1931.  The company started building farm tractors with Harry Ferguson, (i.e. Massey-Ferguson), in 1936.

In 1947, David Brown was looking to "have a bit of fun,"  and purchased two small volume (and financially troubled) auto makers, Aston Martin and Lagonda.  His first car, code named the "Atom," went on sale in 1948 as the Aston Martin DB1, with DB1 standing for David Brown 1st model.  This well balanced road racer was, basically, an experiment with only 15 being produced. 

Brown discovered that he had a wonderful chassis from Aston Martin.  He also had an equally wonderful 2.6L DOHC I-6 engine from Lagonda designed by W. O. Bentley.   The 2-seat DB2 went on sale in 1950.  Further refinements and improvements, and the addition of 2 more seats, resulted in the DB2/4 in 1953, one of which is shown below.  This is an extremely rare and highly sought-after car, being one of 566 "Mark I' models produced .  .  .





And since we're talking about British cars, I've seen this Lotus Espirit previously at local shows.  The Turbocharged 2.2L I-4 engine produces a rather astonishing for the era 228 hp.


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« Reply #24 on: November 10, 2013, 01:18:51 AM »

I'm one of the few people in this world who really likes the C4 body Corvette.  Produced from 1984 - 1996, the C4 is generally known as a harsh-riding creature that feels incredibly cramped and confining, (I don't fit in the coupe version).  Yet for some reason, the C4 cars from the mid-1990s are among my favorite Corvettes.  This particular car features a wonderful color combination.





Also on hand was the C4's great-grandpa, a beautiful C1 car from 1954, one of 3,640 produced that year.





It certainly isn't much by today's standards.  But the 155 hp produced by the "Blue-Flame Six" was a pretty decent amount 60 years ago.  For some reason that makes absolutely no sense to me at all, the C1 Corvette is regarded as one of the "worst" cars of all-time, despite the fact that contemporary publications paint a very different picture.


« Last Edit: November 10, 2013, 01:21:51 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #25 on: November 13, 2013, 12:38:01 AM »

And finally, I circled past the Porsche parking area.  





In between the pair of arrest-me-red 911 Cabrios sat a very rare 1974 Porsche Carrera, one of 246 made that year.  I've seen this beautiful car at other local shows.





Further down the row sat a Porsche 928.  





I didn't get the year of this car.  But it appears to be a mid-1980s model, which would make the engine either a 4.7L or 5.0L V-8.





You can probably guess that the Boxster is one of my favorites.  This late-model Boxster looks great in dark blue.





Great show this year.  Thanks for reading .  .  .
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