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Author Topic: Crystal Hills Memorial Day Car Show, Athens, GA, May 27, 2013 . . .  (Read 18535 times)
Oldcarsarecool
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« on: October 12, 2013, 09:55:26 PM »

Each Memorial Day, a car show is held in the beautiful neighborhood of Crystal Hills just south of Athens.  This will be my third trip to the Crystal Hills show since I've lived here.  The show never fails to disappoint in terms of the diversity and exceptional quality of machinery present.  From the late model daily driver collectibles to the 6-figure Ferraris, this show is a feast for the eyes.  This year was no exception.





I'm a bit late with these pics.  But, that seems to be the story of my life.  So in the better-late-than-never spirit, I hope you enjoy the show .  .  .
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« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2013, 11:07:51 PM »

Cadillac Eldorados have always been a favorite of mine.  This 1976 was leaving the show as I arrived.  I particularly love the atypical golden brown color.





I remember seeing Chevy Novas everywhere when I first got my license in the 1980s.  A bunch of the people I hung out with had them in varying conditions.  In the 30 years that have passed, I just don't see many of them any more.  I like the green color on this 1970 model.





This is a small-block car with a bench seat and 4-speed manual transmission, and was quite nice.





In 1964, Pontiac took a big V-8 engine and put it in an intermediate sized car and created the "muscle car" movement in the process.  The GTO was an instant hit.  Oldsmobile was the first division to join the party with the 442 in late 1964.  Buick followed in 1965 with the Gran Sport.  For 1967, the Gran Sport became the GS400, which was available in coupe or convertible form, (shown below).





Originally, power came from Buick's 401 CID "Nailhead" V-8 that made 325 hp.  For 1967, Buick introduced a new 400 CID V-8 that made 340 hp.  Buick produced close to 20,000 Gran Sports in 1967.  But only 2,140 of them were convertibles, making this car quite rare.





The Dodge Dart is one of those curious vehicles that has had three different identities during its original lifespan from 1960-1976.  The original Dart appeared in 1960 as a full-size car placed one step down from the other full-size Dodges (the Polara and Matador) in the product lineup.  For 1962, the Dart was shifted to the intermediate "B" Platform, (i.e. Plymouth Fury).  For 1963, the Dart was shifted again, this time to the compact "A" Platform where it shared assembly line space with the Plymouth Valiant.  It would remain a compact through 1976 when the model was discontinued.  This particular car is a 1966 V-8 hardtop with the upper-level "270" trim.





Being a compact, the biggest engine you could get from the factory was a 273 CID V-8 that, in 1966, made 235 hp.  In a car that weighed around 2,900 pounds, acceleration was actually pretty decent, (though a far cry from the dual-quad Ramcharger 413 of 1962).





This car was beautifully restored and was quite well done ! 


« Last Edit: October 12, 2013, 11:21:38 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2013, 11:50:45 PM »

I got to see a new Tesla Model S in person at this show.





Tesla Motors is riding high on the heals all the positive press its Model S has received.  The maker's website calls it the "Safest Car in America" as a result of it receiving 5 stars in all categories  of the crash testing conducted by NHTSA.  Motor Trend Magazine named it 2013 "Car of the Year."  Automobile Magazine awarded it the "Automobile of the Year" for 2013.  And Consumer Reports gave it 99 out of a possible 100 points in their tests, calling it the best car they have ever tested.  Hopefully, the latest report of a Model S catching fire after running over a large piece of metal at highway speeds won't be overblown by our worthless news media.

Like my Boxster, the Model S has two luggage compartments, one in front and one in rear.  The difference is that you could probably put my entire Boxster under the hood of this car.  Luggage capacity appears to be quite generous.





The car owner was demonstrating how the door locks work when I passed by.  I didn't catch the whole story.  But apparently, the car detects the presence of the key fob as it nears the car, and "unlocks" the vehicle by exposing the door handles.





When the driver gets out of the car and "locks" it via the key fob, the door handles retract into "lock" position.





Very cool !
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« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2013, 12:36:40 AM »

We go from the latest and most advanced automobile technology above to the unbelievably simple days of old below.





Ford produced one car in 1931 - the Model A.  However, it was available in 17 different body configurations.  This particular car is a Deluxe Fordor 5-passenger sedan, one of 4,967 made that year.  And it is beautiful !





The mascot, (or hood ornament), is called the "Flying Quail."  It was used from 1927 through 1933 when it was replaced by the "Greyhound."





I headed to the next row to see a familiar face.  I've photographed the green original-owner 1965 Chevy Impala Sport Coupe on the far left at other shows.  In the middle is a beautiful 1969 Camaro Convertible.  And on the right is the Dodge Ram's grandpa from 1948.





Opposite of the above sat a new Camaro SS that has had a bunch of custom work done.  Next to it is 1955 Chevy 2-door sedan.  The lack of any brightwork on the body leads me to believe it may be a base model "150," (as opposed to the mid-level "210" or upscale "Bel Air").  Rounding out this row are a 1946 Ford street rod, a 1960 Edsel Ranger, and a 1953 Chevrolet 2-door hardtop.





That Edsel is an extremely rare car.  According to this edsel.com page, 1960 model year production began on September 14, 1959, but ended two months later on November 19, 1959.  Total Edsel production for its final year of 1960 was a mere 2,846 cars.  This Ranger 4-door sedan is one of 1,288 produced.





Volumes have been written about the Edsel's "unfortunate" styling that, in actuality, was no better or worse than any of its contemporaries.  The brand's failure goes much deeper than that.  I have chronicled what I believe to be the underlying reasons why Edsel has become the poster child for what not to do in the automobile industry at THIS LINK.





This particular car is a nicely preserved/restored example.  I love the car's lines, especially the huge trunk !


« Last Edit: October 19, 2013, 01:21:01 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2013, 01:28:39 AM »

MGs were never known for their refinement.  Actually, the opposite is true.  Morris Garages automobiles have been known as bare-bones, no-nonsense sports cars since the very beginning in 1924.  Refinement and livability have always taken a back seat to simple engineering and outright fun.  

In the 1930s, an MG could weigh as little as 1,100 pounds.  This means the 52 CID I-4 engine used in those days that made 27 hp didn't have to work that hard to move the car.  MG used small-displacement 4-cyllinder engines until 1967 when the 6-cylinder MGC was introduced.  It was available as a GT (closed car), or roadster.  The car shown below is a 1969 MGC Roadster.      





When compared with the 95 hp 4-cylinder MGB, the additional 2 cylinders increased power to 145 hp for the above MGC.  Unfortunately, this increase in horsepower was offset by an increase in weight, (2,030 pounds for the MGB vs 2,460 pounds for the MGC), with most of it sitting over the front wheels.  Handling, and the resulting "fun" factor, suffered.  The additional cost of this arrangement curtailed sales, (a total of 4,550 roadsters were produced over the model run).  

But, I'll give MG credit for a good idea .  .  .




« Last Edit: October 18, 2013, 12:23:25 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2013, 01:21:48 AM »

The brothers Joseph, Robert, and Ray Graham were successful glass manufacturers before entering the automobile business in 1919.  Their first venture involved modifying Ford Model Ts and TTs with kits of their own creation.  By 1922, Graham Brothers was a maker of trucks powered by Dodge engines and sold at Dodge dealers.  In 1927, the Graham brothers purchased the Paige-Detroit Motor Company.  The resulting Graham-Paige company produced automobiles under the Graham name.  This 1940 Model 108 would be among the last Graham automobiles built before production was suspended in September 1940. 





Graham automobiles were known for their forward-thinking styling.  Ideas such as moving the radiator cap under the hood and integrating the headlamps into the front fenders were pretty radical in those days.  In 1934, Graham one-upped the industry by offering a supercharged engine in a modestly priced car.  The supercharger would remain on the option list until the very end, and Graham sold more of them than any other manufacturer, (a record that stood until the 1990s).





This unit was an original design, done in-house by Graham engineers.  Output was increased from 93 hp in the unblown cars in 1940 to 120 hp with the blower.  Plus, it just looks really cool !





Like so many other small-volume manufacturers of the day, Graham was unable to fully recover from the effects of the Great Depression.  Automobile production ceased in 1940.  But, Graham actually did extremely well during the WWII years because of government contracts.  Joseph Frazier bought the company in 1944, which lead to a Kaiser-Frazier Corporation buyout of all automobile interests in 1947.  Remnants of the Graham-Paige Company currently own Madison Square Garden in New York .  .  .
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« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2013, 01:43:31 AM »

In 1955, the Ford Fairlane Crown Victoria was available with a glass roof, (only 1,999 were made), and with a solid roof.  The beautiful 'Vic below is one of 33,165 produced with the solid roof.  With more than 625,000 Fairlanes made that year, this car is actually pretty rare.





I've photographed this 1956 Ford Dirt Track race car previously. 





This is a local car from the Athens area that frequented the now-defunct Athens Speedway for many years. 





The car was recently restored to "as raced" condition.





I'm not familiar with dirt track racing.  But, this looks like some pretty intense hardware .  .  .


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« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2013, 01:04:28 PM »

I love that triple carb 6-cyl MG.  But, if I was going to go to the trouble to transplant an engine from and MGC GT to an MGB conv, I'd prefer to transplant a Ford 302 or a Chevy LS engine.  butt rock
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« Reply #8 on: October 19, 2013, 01:31:15 AM »

I love that triple carb 6-cyl MG.  But, if I was going to go to the trouble to transplant an engine from and MGC GT to an MGB conv, I'd prefer to transplant a Ford 302 or a Chevy LS engine.  butt rock


With the MG being around for so long, it shouldn't be much of a surprise to find out that someone has already done such a thing .  .  .



Click for more info !


I like the variety of alternate engines used .  .  .
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« Reply #9 on: October 19, 2013, 10:05:03 PM »

Plymouth wasn't the most creative company when it came to naming its products in the 1960s.  In 1965, for example, Plymouth's full-sized car was available in 4 different trim levels, all of which were named "Fury."  The more options a buyer added, the more Roman Numerals were attached to the name.  Taxi cab companies and police departments usually ordered the bare-bones "Fury I."  The next trim level was called the "Fury II," and after that came the "Fury III."  Sport-oriented buyers lost the Roman Numerals, but still kept the Fury name with the "Sport Fury."  The mid-sized Belvedere followed the same pattern with the Belvedere I and Belvedere II.  The top trim level was given the name "Satellite."

The car shown below may not be the absolute King-of-the-Hill RO5 Super Stock Belvedere I, (Plymouth assembled approx. 102 lightweight race cars that came with the A990 Race Hemi under the hood).  But it is a beautifully restored 1965 Plymouth Satellite. 





This car was extremely nice !  Out of the nearly 162,000 mid-sized Belvederes sold in 1965, 23,341 were Satellite hardtops.  I'm not sure how many of them were equipped with the A-833 4-speed manual transmission.  But, this car is one of them.  Very cool .  .  .


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« Reply #10 on: October 20, 2013, 12:35:22 AM »

The Chrysler Airflow introduced in 1934 was a car way ahead of its time.  In those days, the ideas of "streamlining" and "aerodynamics" were given very little consideration during the design process.  Chrysler decided to give the idea a shot and introduced 4 Airflow models under the Chrysler badge, and one model under the DeSoto badge.  The resulting car looked very different from everything else on the road.  This is a 1935 DeSoto Airflow.





The design was groundbreaking.  Integrating the headlamps into the front fenders, for example, was a radical styling departure from the standards of the day.  This design allowed the engine and passenger compartment to be moved forward in an effort to improve weight distribution.  The interior of the car was roomier.  Structurally, the chassis was much more rigid.

Unfortunately, it was too much of a radical departure from the norm for the public to accept.  Sales of the non-Airflow models, (Chrysler's CA and CB), outsold the Airflow by more than 2 to 1 in 1934, and by almost 4 to 1 in 1935.  This is a 1934 Chrysler CA.


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« Reply #11 on: October 20, 2013, 01:33:39 AM »

Along with its "Super" and "Commodore" models for 1947, Hudson also offered a Model 178 pickup truck which was officially listed as a "3/4 ton Commercial." 





I love the wooden bed !  Someone put a lot of time into the restoration, and it showed.





This truck is extremely rare being one of 2,917 produced that year. 





Seen on the left side of the reflection in the Hudson's tailgate is a beautiful Studebaker pickup.  Trucks have been part of Studebaker's product line since 1914/1915.  Offerings ranged from 1/2 ton pickups through 3 ton medium duty commercial vehicles.  This particular example is a 1956 Model 2E Transtar. 





This truck was not nearly as stock as the Hudson above, (not at all stock, actually).  It was, however, equally as nice, having a bunch of custom work done.





Motivation comes courtesy of a modified 392 Mopar Hemi, a beautiful site in itself.





Rounding out the pickups was this restored 1961 Studebaker Series 6E Champ. 





Studebaker was already on life support when the hugely successful Lark was introduced in 1959, (which actually saved Studebaker from going belly-up right there).  For 1960, engineers wanted to give the pickup line a makeover, but had no funding to do so.  They discovered that the front nose of the Lark would fit quite well on the light duty truck chassis with little modification.  The result was the Champ.  Around 26,000 Champs were made from 1960 - 1964, with roughly 5,500 produced in 1961.


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« Reply #12 on: October 20, 2013, 02:16:54 PM »


With the MG being around for so long, it shouldn't be much of a surprise to find out that someone has already done such a thing .  .  .


http://www.fastcarsinc.com/mgbv8.htm

I like the variety of alternate engines used .  .  .

Wow!  I'd love to own an MG-V8.  Their gallery is so impressive, with the exception of the wheels on the red GT.
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« Reply #13 on: October 26, 2013, 06:57:40 PM »

Early Chevrolets were known by either a letter or number "Series" designation.  The larger cars were designated Series FA (1917-1918), which morphed into the Series FB (1919-1922).  The smaller cars were known as the Series 490 (1915-1922), named for its $490 price. 

In 1923, Chevrolet added the word "Superior" to each series designation, (i.e. Superior Series B for 1923).  The Series name would change each year but the Superior name would remain in place, (i.e. Superior Series F, Superior Series K, and Superior Series V for 1924, 1925, and 1926, respectively).  After that, Chevrolet began changing the line name each year.  In 1927, "Superior" became "Capitol."  The 1928 line became "National," 1929 "International," 1930 "Universal," 1931 "Independence," 1932 "Confederate," and "Eagle" in 1933. 

This is a beautifully restored 1932 Chevrolet Confederate Series BA.





The Confederate Series BA was available in both Standard and Deluxe trim over 17 different body configurations, with this car being a Deluxe Sport Roadster, 1 of 8,552 produced that year.





In 1933, Chevrolet began offering a second product line, (called "Eagle" in 1933).  Beginning in 1934, Chevrolet would adopt the "Master" name, which it would use through 1942. 

I've photographed this beautiful 1936 Chevrolet Master Deluxe Town Sedan previously.





Power comes from Chevrolet's 207 CID "Stovebolt" I-6 that made 79 hp.


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« Reply #14 on: October 27, 2013, 01:43:39 AM »

In the 1980s, Classic Motor Carriages (CMC) grafted a beautiful neo-classic body on top of a stock Mercury Cougar chassis and created the Classic Tiffany which was sold as a complete car, (CMC was actually a kit-car builder).  The result was an awesome looking car that could be daily-driven and serviced at any Ford dealer.





However, the story behind CMC is WAY  more interesting than the "Classic Tiffany" car, itself .  .  .

Classic Motor Carriages was a kit car manufacturer from Miami, Florida that was already building a Gazelle (Mercedes SSK), Porsche Speedster, and a Classic Cobra among others when it acquired fellow kit car maker Fiberfab in 1983.  The Miami Herald referred to CMC as, "the nation's largest manufacturer of replica car kits."    As near as I can determine, production of the Classic Tiffany began sometime in the mid-1980s.  When new, they were reported to cost in the $50k - $60k price range.  And all was well.

Fraud complaints about your company are never a good thing.  Hundreds of them gets you in serious trouble.  The Florida Attorney General's office filed suit in 1994 claiming deceptive trade practices.  The federal government then filed criminal charges against the company for mail fraud, forcing it to close in 1995 and pay $2.5 million in restitution.  In the midst of all this legal wrangling, CMC reopened under the name Classic Auto Replicars, Inc. (CARS), and then became Street Beasts which ceased operations in 2010. 

Street Beasts was a rather well-known name in the kit car world, but not always for the right reasons.  Members of the HotRodders.com forum discussed this at length and posted this crankshaftcoalition.com page highlighting the connection between CMC, the previously mentioned fraud conviction, and Street Beasts.  That didn't go over too well with Street Beasts who filed suit against the HotRodders.com forum in 2008 for defamation.  The forum members banded together to fight the suit, the details of which are chronicled HERE.

Apparently, that was just the tip of the iceberg.  According to this 2009 Broward/Palm Beach New Times, Street Beasts owner George Levin has been linked to the Scott W. Rothstein 1.2 billion dollar Ponzi scheme. 

Fascinating stuff .  .  .
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