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Author Topic: The last show of the 2012 season at The Varsity, November 11, 2012 . . .  (Read 32956 times)
Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2013, 02:05:42 AM »

This is a 1974 Corvette Convertible.  I've always loved the C3 body's lines which work especially well with the Arrest-Me Red paint seen on this car.





A total of 5,474 Corvette Convertibles were produced in 1974.  But more importantly, this car is one of only 3,494 cars produced with the 270 hp 454 CID V-8.  This was the last year the big-block was available.








Earlier, we saw two nearly identical 1965 Chevy Impala Sport Coupes.  This blue 1965 Tri-Power GTO is nearly identical to the red 1965 Tri-Power GTO seen earlier, only without the Royal Bobcat sticker.








In 1972, an Oldsmobile 442 was ordered under RPO code W29 - 442 Appearance and Handling Package.  By then, the 442 had reverted back to an option package rather than a separate model.  This means there is no way to identify an authentic 1972 442 through the trim tag or VIN, (except if the engine code is "X" indicating the W30 455 CID V-8 which indicated a 442 by default).  I've photographed this particular 442 Convertible before.  The car is beautiful AND is, as of this writing, for sale .  .  .


« Last Edit: August 24, 2013, 10:49:05 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #16 on: August 12, 2013, 10:58:42 PM »

This is a 1974 Corvette Convertible.  I've always loved the C3 body's lines which work especially well with the Arrest-Me Red paint seen on this car.





A total of 5,474 Corvette Convertibles were produced in 1974.  But more importantly, this car is one of only 3,494 cars produced with the 270 hp 454 CID V-8.  This was the last year the big-block was available.
...

Oh man, when I turned 16 yo in 82 I dated a girl whose dad restored a red 454 C3 T-top for her but it had chrome bumpers, a few years older than that 74.  And, she still owns that car today!
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« Reply #17 on: August 14, 2013, 10:34:10 AM »

The original BMC Mini, which debuted in 1959, has become an icon, much like its German counterpart VW Beetle.  It's compact design worked well in Europe, but not so well in the bigger-is-better US.  A few did make it across the pond.  This is a 1974 edition produced when the company was owned by British Leyland.





The giant fender flares may have you wondering whether or not this car is 100% stock.  It's not, not by a long shot.  "The Midi" is a product of Mini Tec from Royston, Georgia, (about an hour north of Athens).  Mini Tec specializes in Honda VTEC conversions for the classic Mini.  In this case, the term "Midi" refers to the car's mid-engine layout, (i.e. a mid-engine Mini).  The original 850cc 34 hp engine and front-wheel drive setup has been replaced with a Honda J32 VTEC V-6 from a 2003 Acura C-Type S that has been installed behind the driver.  The completely stock Acura components are complimented with custom front and rear subframes, bigger brakes, caged interior, and a host of other race car goodies.



Click for more information !





More Rat-Rod goodness .  .  .





I'm going to call this a Quad Cab Rat-Rod pickup.  Looks pretty well done.








This is a beautiful 1966 Chevelle.





The original 396 big-block has been replaced with a 427 Tri-Power setup .  .  .


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« Reply #18 on: August 15, 2013, 01:19:10 AM »

The one year only 1970 Plymouth Superbird, (and it's 1969 predecessor Dodge Charger Daytona), are classic examples of the function-over-form design philosophy.  They were made to do one thing and one thing only  -  dominate the NASCAR track, which they did quite well.  This didn't sit too well with NASCAR, which immediately enacted rule changes to get rid of the "aerocars."  The generally accepted Plymouth Superbird production figure is 1,920 with, according to the Aero Warriors site, almost 1/4 of them being Lemon Twist Yellow.





This car is a 440 Six-Pack car with the 4-speed manual transmission. 





Total production for Six-Pack equipped cars appears to be 716.  Of that total, approx. 308 cars had the 4-speed manual transmission.





According to the fender tag, this is the real thing.





On a Mopar, the tag is read from the bottom up .  .  .
~  E87 = 440 Six-Pack V-8.
~  D21 = HD 4-speed manual transmission. 
~  RM23 V0A 169460 = the car's VIN number, which should match the tag on the A-Pillar:  R=mid-size car, M=price class, 2=2-door, 3=hardtop, V=440 Six-Pack, 0=1970 model year, A=Lynch Road assembly plant, 169460=assembly plant sequence number.

The next row up .  .  .
~  FY1 = exterior color, Lemon Twist Yellow.
~  P6XA = black interior with bucket seats.
~  TX9 = upper door frame paint color.  On cars without a full door panel, some metal is exposed, which must be painted.  Black interior cars will have TX9.
~  B30 = the scheduled production date.  All Superbirds will show B30, or November 30, 1969, even though not all were actually assembled on that exact day.
~  J98174 = vehicle order number. 

The next row up .  .  .
~  V19 = special order black vinyl roof.
~  V88 = Transverse Sport Stripe delete.

The next row up .  .  .
~  26 = 26" radiator, (all Superbirds had a 26" radiator).
~  C16 = center console.

The next row up .  .  .
~  122 = engine code/transmission combination code, 440+6 and manual transmission.
~  083 = rear axle code, Dana 9 3/4", 3.54:1 Ratio.
~  676 = transmission code, 833 4-speed manual transmission.

And finally, the top row .  .  .
~  05107 = Gate Series code.
~  169282 = Line Sequence Number.
(These are internal assembly plant codes relating to how the car was assembled).

This is a beautiful and extremely rare car !  One of my favorites on that day .  .  .


« Last Edit: August 15, 2013, 01:22:56 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #19 on: August 17, 2013, 12:16:14 AM »

Why do you gotta leave us hanging, Lee?  What's the story with the old Pontiacs?   





Yes Lee, do tell.  This sounds like an interesting story .  .  .



OK, so here's part of the story. I know the history books that Todd has will show that this didn't exist, but my dad is a hardcore car nut and he says that the history books are wrong, because he had his hands deep into these cars and knows it for a fact.

He wasn't much into school, just cars, and my grandfather cut timber and ran a sawmill. So he quit going to school at the end of the 6th grade to work in the woods cutting timber. This was in the late 50s. He got a job at a local garage/junk yard/wrecker service working on cars at about 12. Keep in mind, this was the rural South. By 14 he was rebuilding engines and driving a wrecker to clean up major accidents being worked by the Georgia State Patrol. He has never taken a driver's license test in his life, he was already running from the cops in souped up cars he built at the junkyard and all the cops knew who he was (this was a different time and a different era than now). When he was 16, the GSP officer that patrolled that area came by his house and brought him a license. He knew him from the wrecks he worked driving a wrecker since he was 14. Said that if he was going to be running from the law and driving a wrecker, he should at least have a license.

Well on to the story about the Pontiacs. This was in a tiny little town in Georgia, but the sheriff was a hardcore badass. Car nut, and loved fast cars and chases. He was a legend in the area (and still is). By that time he was a Pontiac man, and he had high up connections within Pontiac motor company. My dad swears that he ordered from the factory and they had 64' 65' GTOs with 421 HO motors with 3 2bbls and 4 speed transmissions. The sheriff was a highspeed nut and the interstate was being built through there at the time so he wanted them with high gear ratio rear ends for top end speed.

The a fore mentioned garage where dad worked did all the service and maintenance on the police cars so he had intimate knowledge of them. He says that one of the deputies wasn't very good at driving a 4 speed, especially one with a super tall rear gear and burned the clutch out of a brand new one in about 1500 miles. Dad put a clutch in this 3 duece 421 GTO himself and drove it extensively.

Now I know the history books will say that the 421 came in the Catalina, never the GTO, but I know this stuff for a fact, there were at least a few GTOs that had a 421.

And this story continues into the 70s, long after my dad had moved on from working on cars, when this Pontiac loving Sheriff was one of the first in the nation to put Trans Ams on the street as patrol cars. It was on national tv shows and featured in Car and Driver, which I have a copy of. I'm trying to either scan it or take pics, more to come later. 

 
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« Reply #20 on: August 17, 2013, 03:56:02 PM »

An awful lot of "cars that were never made" stories continue to persist over the years.  A 1970 Plymouth Superbird Convertible falls into this category.  There are pictures and stories from people who claim to have seen them up close and personal.  But the "official" record is usually the only one that can be substantiated to any degree. 

In the case of the GTO, all factory documentation says that no GTO ever had a 421 installed at the factory.  But, we will really never know for sure.  In those days, the factory could get away with quite a bit.  If you had the right connections, the factory would bend over backwards in the name of customer satisfaction.  At the dealership level, places like Ace Wilson's Royal Pontiac would be more than happy to replace the 389 with a Bobcat 421 in the new GTO you just purchased.  These swaps were advertised and actually very simple. 

Then there's stuff like this:  Jim Wangers, former director of Public Relations at Pontiac from those days, is known as the "Godfather of the GTO."  He didn't create the car, itself.  He was responsible for the hype, publicity, and controversy that surrounded it.  As an "ad man," Wangers knew the meaning of the statement, "any publicity is good publicity." 

Hot Rod Magazine put an all new 1964 GTO through its paces in late 1963, (a reprint of the article is shown on this Goatsgarage.com page).  The car tested was a 4bbl convertible with a 2-speed automatic transmission.  Hot Rod liked the car even though it didn't exactly set the test track on fire.  When Wangers got wind of this, he made sure that ALL future magazine test cars were chosen and prepped by him.  And by "him," I mean the staff at Royal Pontiac. 

Wangers took this "prepping" idea one step further with the now famous (or infamous) Car & Driver Magazine road test from March 1964.  That car, a 4-speed, Tri-Power car with 3.90 gears, went zero to 100 mph in 12 seconds. 

Pay special attention to the 3rd paragraph on page 2 from that link:  "Our test car was equipped with the 389-cubic-inch, 348 horsepower, V-8 engine .  .  ."  Questions had persisted for decades until Wangers set the record straight in his 1998 book "Glory Days."  The car supplied to Car & Driver was, in fact, a "ringer."  The 389 had been yanked in favor of a visually identical 421 Super Duty V-8 with a Royal Bobcat tuning package.

The truth is that with all these "cars that were never built," we will never know for sure.  But that is precisely what makes these stories so great to read.  Personally, I would prefer to enjoy the stories much more than I would just hearing "the truth," and being done with the discussion .  .  .
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« Reply #21 on: August 17, 2013, 11:57:14 PM »

An awful lot of "cars that were never made" stories continue to persist over the years.  A 1970 Plymouth Superbird Convertible falls into this category.  There are pictures and stories from people who claim to have seen them up close and personal.  But the "official" record is usually the only one that can be substantiated to any degree. 

In the case of the GTO, all factory documentation says that no GTO ever had a 421 installed at the factory.  But, we will really never know for sure.  In those days, the factory could get away with quite a bit.  If you had the right connections, the factory would bend over backwards in the name of customer satisfaction.  At the dealership level, places like Ace Wilson's Royal Pontiac would be more than happy to replace the 389 with a Bobcat 421 in the new GTO you just purchased.  These swaps were advertised and actually very simple. 

Then there's stuff like this:  Jim Wangers, former director of Public Relations at Pontiac from those days, is known as the "Godfather of the GTO."  He didn't create the car, itself.  He was responsible for the hype, publicity, and controversy that surrounded it.  As an "ad man," Wangers knew the meaning of the statement, "any publicity is good publicity." 

Hot Rod Magazine put an all new 1964 GTO through its paces in late 1963, (a reprint of the article is shown on this Goatsgarage.com page).  The car tested was a 4bbl convertible with a 2-speed automatic transmission.  Hot Rod liked the car even though it didn't exactly set the test track on fire.  When Wangers got wind of this, he made sure that ALL future magazine test cars were chosen and prepped by him.  And by "him," I mean the staff at Royal Pontiac. 

Wangers took this "prepping" idea one step further with the now famous (or infamous) Car & Driver Magazine road test from March 1964.  That car, a 4-speed, Tri-Power car with 3.90 gears, went zero to 100 mph in 12 seconds. 

Pay special attention to the 3rd paragraph on page 2 from that link:  "Our test car was equipped with the 389-cubic-inch, 348 horsepower, V-8 engine .  .  ."  Questions had persisted for decades until Wangers set the record straight in his 1998 book "Glory Days."  The car supplied to Car & Driver was, in fact, a "ringer."  The 389 had been yanked in favor of a visually identical 421 Super Duty V-8 with a Royal Bobcat tuning package.

The truth is that with all these "cars that were never built," we will never know for sure.  But that is precisely what makes these stories so great to read.  Personally, I would prefer to enjoy the stories much more than I would just hearing "the truth," and being done with the discussion .  .  .

I understand where you're coming from and I agree with you. The thing that changes the dynamic of my story is the fact that its coming straight from my father. Not a second hand tale, but from someone that worked on these cars monthly, did all the oil changes, brake jobs, clutches, tune ups, etc. drove them on a regular basis and had no reason to embellish. In fact, he never knew that a GTO was supposedly un-available with the 421 until I told him a few years ago. He can spot little things to distinguish old cars instantly, not so good with cars from the 70's on up. He actually tore down a couple of these engines and rebuilt them after they were blown up in chases. Even put a hot cam in a couple of them when they were practically new because the sheriff wanted them faster.

I'll get the Trans Am story together soon, you'll love it. They were stripped down cars, all of them white with red interior, the WS6 suspension package, 400 Pontiac with no A/C (he didn't believe in it, robs power and not necessary for the job, lol) and a 4 speed (pretty rare at that time, most of the high performance F bodies were autos) with a tall gear ratio.

To hold you over, here's a picture of the Sheriff with one of them.







 
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« Reply #22 on: August 18, 2013, 12:38:20 AM »

This 1957 Chevrolet was very well done.  I like the stock exterior appearance which has been combined with an exceptionally clean underhood area.





For whatever reason, I didn't take the time to check the car out.  Now that I look at the pics, my first question is where are the brake booster and master cylinder ?








The automotive dark ages of the late 1970s and early 1980s was a scary time for the enthusiast thanks to the bobbleheads in Washington DC.  There was very little "muscle" left in the muscle car.  So, Pontiac turned to the next best thing  -  take a sporty looking car, give it as much power as you could, and add some flares and graphics.  The idea was to convey an image of performance even though the actual numbers may not have been there.  This strategy worked.  Pontiac sold almost 69,000 Trans Ams in 1977, thanks in part to Burt Reynolds, Jerry Reed, Sally Field, and Jackie Gleason.





Three different engines were available in the 1977 Trans Am.  RPO L80 designated the 185 hp Oldsmobile-derived 403 CID V-8 paired with an automatic transmission.  RPO L78 designated the 180 hp Pontiac-derived 400 CID V-8 paired with an automatic transmission.  The top engine option in 1977 was RPO W72, a 200 hp Pontiac-derived 400 CID V-8 mated to a 4-speed manual transmission.  Although 200 hp was a decent amount for the era, it paled in comparison to the RA-IV cars of a decade earlier.  The 4-speed manual transmission and 325 ft-lbs of torque available at a low, low 2,400 rpm did a good job of making up for the deficit. 





This particular car is a 1977 Trans Am SE, or "Special Edition."  The SE was available under two RPO codes:  RPO Y81 indicated the SE package without the T-Roof, and RPO Y82 was the same car with the T-Roof.  So what we have here is a Y82 Trans Am SE with the W72 engine option.  According to the wealth of documentation displayed with the car, only 2,699 cars were produced this way.





I've loved the Trans Ams from the 1970s since they were new.  Awesome cars .  .  .


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« Reply #23 on: August 18, 2013, 12:49:09 AM »


I understand where you're coming from and I agree with you. The thing that changes the dynamic of my story is the fact that its coming straight from my father. Not a second hand tale, but from someone that worked on these cars monthly, did all the oil changes, brake jobs, clutches, tune ups, etc. drove them on a regular basis and had no reason to embellish. In fact, he never knew that a GTO was supposedly un-available with the 421 until I told him a few years ago. He can spot little things to distinguish old cars instantly, not so good with cars from the 70's on up. He actually tore down a couple of these engines and rebuilt them after they were blown up in chases. Even put a hot cam in a couple of them when they were practically new because the sheriff wanted them faster.

I'll get the Trans Am story together soon, you'll love it. They were stripped down cars, all of them white with red interior, the WS6 suspension package, 400 Pontiac with no A/C (he didn't believe in it, robs power and not necessary for the job, lol) and a 4 speed (pretty rare at that time, most of the high performance F bodies were autos) with a tall gear ratio.

To hold you over, here's a picture of the Sheriff with one of them.








I'd hate to be a person getting arrested and made to sit in the back seat of a Trans Am on my way to jail.  That would be punishment enough.  By the way, I don't want to give the impression that I disagree with you in any way.  I welcome the learning experience and new/additional information that I may not be aware of otherwise.

I believe firmly that just when I think I "know" something, the universe is always there to teach me a lesson.  Unfortunately for me, it's taken two divorces for this to sink in .  .  .
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« Reply #24 on: August 18, 2013, 11:42:56 PM »

A couple of nice 1963 Ford Galaxies sat across from each other.  The first car is a Galaxie 500 2-door fastback hardtop.  At some point, the original V-8 (probably a 390) was replaced with a dual-quad 428.  This necessitated the replacement of the stock hood with a Thunderbolt-style "Teardrop" hood so the carbs and air cleaner would fit.





The second car is also a Galaxie 500, but is the 2-door sedan body.  The painted steelies with dog-dish hubcaps are great !





This car retains its stock 390 CID V-8 and a/c.  Both cars were exceptionally clean.








This is a 1956 Ford dirt track race car.  From what I remember, the description with the car indicated that it was owned by a local driver, and has been restored to as-raced condition.  I was able to get a short clip of this car running, which we'll hear later on.








I haven't seen a Chevy Citation in years !  This one looked pretty nice, (which is also seldom seen).








I see a lot of street rods at the shows in this area.  That segment of the hobby appears to be quite popular.  This car comes with its own trailer and Chevrolet big-block power.








I'm not exactly sure what to call this other than a VW Rat Rod.  The 1971 VW Beetle body is sitting on top of a home built frame.  Under the hood is a small block Chevrolet V-8 mated to a Turbo 350 automatic transmission.  The front suspension is from a Mustang and the rear end is from a 1972 Chevelle.  Probably the most unique vehicle I've seen in a while .  .  .


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« Reply #25 on: August 19, 2013, 12:02:18 AM »

I first saw this Jaguar E-type at the Cars of the Past Car Show in Covington, GA on October 2, 2011.  It's a Series I car finished in traditional British Racing Green.  Absolutely stunning !





Back then, I noticed the gauges seemed to look a little strange, as if they had been replaced with aftermarket racing units.  The keen eyes of Fluxx and MontereyDave noted that the shifter was odd, resembling that of a Mustang.  Those items remain in place today.





After chatting with the car owner, I found out why .  .  .





I don't remember the whole story.  But the general idea behind the swap was to make the car driveable on a regular basis.  Unlike Jaguar parts of that vintage, Mustang parts are cheap, widely available, and very reliable.  Out went the Jaguar 4.2L I-6, and in it's place went a 5.0L Ford V-8.  That intake looks like a custom-made piece .  .  .


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« Reply #26 on: August 23, 2013, 12:48:45 AM »

First generation Camaros are a common sight at car shows.  I'm beginning to see a lot more stock restorations than I used to.  I also tend to see a lot of mildly modified examples that feature things like underhood chrome, fancy wheels and tires, and custom paint.  But every now and then, a "professional quality" car will make an appearance.





The body on this 1969 Camaro is pretty stock except for the reverse-opening hood.  However, this car contains some serious hardware.  Those with keen eyes probably already noticed the roll cage in the above photo.





The entire interior is a custom job, and very well done.  The "Jeffco" logo on the side of the shifter probably indicates a Jeffco Performance transmission, (think "racing" and lots-o'-horsepower).  Speaking of which .  .  .





Take note of the Sonny Leonard logo at the front of the cylinder head and the Sonny's Automotive Racing (SAR) logo on the valve cover.  I thought I heard the number "1500 hp" being thrown around.  And it had a 'chute on the back.  We'll get to hear it run later on .  .  .
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« Reply #27 on: August 25, 2013, 02:52:33 PM »

Studebaker was founded in 1852 as a wagon manufacturer.  Its products were known for their quality and longevity.  They took America west, and often chauffeured Presidents. 



(From the Historic Auto Attractions Museum website, click for more info.)


Automobile production began in 1897, and proved to be profitable until the Great Depression.  Small volume Studebaker barely survived, but just couldn't win against the Big Three and their price wars.  In 1954, a merger with Packard was supposed to provide a much needed boost in customer base.  In actuality, the moderately healthy Packard buyout of not-anywhere-near-healthy Studebaker eventually killed both companies.  Packard died after the 1958 model year.  Studebaker would have also died had it not been for the hugely successful Lark introduced for 1959. 

That worked well for a short time.  A few questionable management decisions combined with the Big Three marketing their own compact cars put Studebaker down for the count again in 1961.  New company president Sherwood Egbert wanted something new and exciting to draw people into Studebaker showrooms.  And the Avanti was born in 1963. 





The car pictured above is an Avanti R1, which is powered by Studebaker's 240 hp 289 CID V-8. A total of 2,282 R1s were produced in 1963.  The car shown in the photo below is an Avanti R2. 





The remaining 1,552 Avantis for 1963 were R2 cars. 





Adding a Paxton supercharger to the R1 boosted the horsepower rating to 290. 





Those with the right connections could order an R3, (a supercharded 304.5 CID car that made 335 hp), of which only 9 were built.  An experimental R4 non-supercharged car with 2-4bbl carburetors made around 280 hp, (none were ordered).  Racer Andy Granatelli attempted to go 200 mph at Bonneville with the exotic fuel-injected twin supercharged R5 "Duo-Centro" that made more than 600 hp, (he made it to 196.58 mph).   

I've seen both of these cars previously at local shows.  Both are beautifully restored .  .  .


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« Reply #28 on: August 30, 2013, 01:08:58 AM »

The 1966 model year would be the last that a GTO would be available with the Tri-Power carburetion package.  The "official" reason GM execs gave for this decision was one of "model hierarchy," (translation:  Corvette supremacy).  A total of 12,798 GTO convertibles were produced that year .  .  .


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« Reply #29 on: August 31, 2013, 02:49:56 PM »

I've seen this 1968 Oldsmobile 442 at local shows before.  The black paint is really well done, judging by the reflection seen on the passenger side of the car.





I'm reading a lot of really confusing information regarding the 1968 Olds 442.  Keen eyes will notice the ram air ducting attached to the air cleaner snorkels in the photo above.  This would normally indicate the presence of RPO W30, the Outside Air Induction package.  W30 cars are quite rare, with only 1,911 produced that year.  Oldsmobile's version of "ram air" drew air from a pair of intakes mounted below the front bumper that were connected to the air cleaner via the ducting.  These intakes are shown in the photo below. 





I don't think this is an authentic W30 car.  It does have the black air cleaner base with chrome lid, (the standard 442 air cleaner was orange and red)  But, it doesn't have the red inner fender liners or the vertical "narrow-wide-narrow" stripe on the front fender at the emblem.  It also has air conditioning, which was not available on the W30.  And, it has power brakes.  Here's where the fun begins. 

According to 442.com, "All 1968 W-30s had manual brakes, as the cam was considered not to generate enough engine vacuum to operate the power booster."  However, a W30 could be ordered with an automatic transmission.  The site goes on to say that, "If you ordered your W-30 auto with P/B  then you got a milder cam .  .  ."  Very confusing.

Either way, this is a beautiful car .  .  .


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