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Author Topic: The last show of the 2012 season at The Varsity, November 11, 2012 . . .  (Read 32959 times)
Oldcarsarecool
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« on: August 10, 2013, 04:38:22 PM »

8th Annual Mack Evans Memorial Cruise In .  .  .  
November 11, 2012





I'm a little late to the party here.  But for one reason or another, I never got these 100-or-so photos posted.  Now seems to be as good a time as any, (especially before 9th Annual show takes place in 3 months).  

The Street Masters Car Club hosts a number of events each year, including a monthly cruise in at The Varsity in Athens, Georgia.  The Mac Evans Memorial Cruise In held at the beginning of November serves as the last show of the season.  And it's a big one - almost 300 cars.  While that number may, physically, not constitute a large show, it sure feels large when all of those cars are squeezed onto The Varsity's property.  Vehicles are parked anywhere they fit.





The paved parking area for the restaurant sits behind the building.  The corner of the building and the parking lot can be seen below.





When the spaces fill up in the paved lot, additional cars will be parked in the travel lanes.





When that fills up, cars will be parked in any location not already occupied by a public road, sidewalk, tree, or other immovable object.








After paying my $5 entry fee, I was directed to the grass area on the right-hand side of the building, (i.e. looking behind where I was standing when I took the first two photos).





I'm surrounded by trucks.  Some really nice trucks.











Entering a car show is the most effective way to determine just how dirty your car actually is.  The Jag isn't a "show car" by any stretch.  But I do want it to look decent.  





It seems the more I looked, the more bugs I found all over anything that faces forward.  Some Quick Detailer, spray-on cleaner wax, glass cleaner, and a good amount of elbow grease later and I was good to go.





And now, on with the show .  .  .
« Last Edit: August 11, 2013, 10:48:56 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2013, 05:38:17 PM »

This 1964 Rambler American Wagon was probably the most unusual car of the show.  First of all, it's a Rambler.  You don't see too many of them anymore, especially wagons.  Second, this particular car has been noticeably lifted in the front.  And third, I don't recall seeing too many Ramblers with a straight pipe exhaust that exits right behind the front wheels.





In the early days of drag racing, racers would go to great lengths to make their cars go faster.  Lifting the front end was thought to enhance weight transfer to the rear upon acceleration.  Replacing the stock independent front suspension with a truck beam axle provided a great way to lift the front end and reduce weight, (since beam axles are lighter).  Plus, it just looks cool !





Racers would make modifications of this nature on their street-driven cars.  The term "Gasser" was coined in the 1950s to reflect this  -  a modified street car that ran on gasoline, (as opposed to nitromethane).  "Street car," in this context, meant that the car had to be licensed, have a full interior, and retain all street equipment.  Go-fast modifications were allowed and encouraged.  But a car in a "gas" class had to be a driveable street legal vehicle.  According to THIS PAGE from Byron's Gasser Madness website, class breakdowns were based on a weight vs. engine size scale.  This particular car shows a C/Gas classification.  





The class rules have evolved dramatically in the 5 decades since.  But in 1964, class "C" meant its weight vs. engine size ratio fell between 10.5 - 11.49 lbs per cubic inch.  "Gas" indicated that this was a non-supercharged car, (a blown car would be shown as C/GS).

This was an awesome car !  We'll get to hear it run later on .  .  .
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« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2013, 06:04:51 PM »

This 1965 Chevy Impala Sport Coupe is a rare find !





The fastback body style is one of my favorites, as is that beautiful green color.





I love the bench seat and factory 4-speed transmission.





But the display with the vehicle tells the real story.  





On March 2, 1965, Raymond Roundtree walked into Meridith Chevrolet one hour up the road in Lavonia, Georgia, handed the sales person $2,479.32, and drove home with a brand new Chevy Impala.  In April 1965, Raymond took a photo of his brand new ride.  Nearly fifty years later, Raymond still owns the car, and shows it at local events all over northern Georgia .  .  .
« Last Edit: November 22, 2014, 06:31:58 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2013, 06:57:36 PM »

I mentioned previously that my parking space was surrounded by trucks.  These three low-riders sat in front of me.





I love the iDrag decal !








This 1946 Mercury street rod was nicely done.  I especially like the stock exterior appearance.





However, that has to be the strangest way to mount a radiator that I've seen.  It looks like a conventional radiator that has been rotated 90 degrees.








This is a 2nd generation Z28 with an updated LS Series V-8.








This 1935 Buick is another well done street rod that features a stock external appearance combined with a modern drivetrain.





I love the chrome and brightwork of the tall grills from that era.





The mascot on the hood is called "The Dancer," and was modeled after dancer Isadora Duncan.






(from this http://patrickmurfin.blogspot.com page)


And now, I present your "Useless Tidbit of Information" for today .  .  .  

Isadora Duncan died in 1927 in Nice, France in a very bizarre automobile accident.  She was a passenger in an open sports car, some reports list an Amilcar, others list a Bugatti.  After saying goodbye to whoever she was with, she got in the car and wrapped a very long scarf around her neck.  She was, after all, riding in a convertible.  When the car drove off, the scarf got caught up in the spokes of the one of the wire wheels, instantly snapping her neck .  .  .
« Last Edit: November 22, 2014, 06:38:08 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2013, 07:01:16 PM »

Was that a Diablo in the second pic?
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« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2013, 07:10:47 PM »

Was that a Diablo in the second pic?


Yes it was .  .  .





The Diablo is still my favorite Lamborghini.  And yes, this is the real thing, 492 hp V-12 and all.





I remember reading about the Countach that if you were over 5'10" tall, your head would rub the roof of the car.  I'm not sure if this was remedied with the Diablo or not.  But looking at that seating position, if there was a remedy, it was nothing more than rotating the seat backwards.





Awesome car .  .  .


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« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2013, 10:37:38 PM »

This beautiful 1965 Pontiac GTO has all the right equipment.





It's got the 360 hp 389 CID Tri-Power V-8.





It's got the 4-speed manual transmission, the Safe-T-Track rear end, and the radio and heater delete.





It's got this .  .  .





Ace Wilson's Royal Pontiac in Royal Oak, Michigan began offering an over-the-counter "Bobcat" tuning kit for Catalinas, GTOs, and Grand Prixs.  This kit was also available via mail order and included the sticker above.  Later on, the techs at Royal would begin swapping out the standard GTO 400 CID V-8 for a tuned 428 much to the chagrin of GM Brass.  And if you had the right connections, Royal could hook you up with the legendary Tunnel Port RA-V 400 CID V-8. 

But best of all, this car has lots of documentation.





The speeding ticket for 110 mph in a 45 mph zone adds a nice touch to the display .  .  .
« Last Edit: August 24, 2013, 10:43:47 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2013, 10:51:44 PM »

This is another 1965 Chevy Impala Sport Coupe. 





Like the green original owner car pictured earlier, this car has the same beautiful fastback styling and is also 327 powered. 





I've seen this Chevy S-10 truck at shows previously. 





I've never got too excited over the whole low-rider concept.  However, this truck was extremely well done.





Whoever built it paid a great deal of attention to detail.  I was impressed with the workmanship.





However, I don't think I would advise driving the truck in the lowered position.  Bad things could happen.





That's a little too close for my comfort level .  .  .
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« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2013, 11:06:45 PM »

Sharing space in this row were three beautiful 1955 Chevy Bel Airs.  The first two sat side-by-side.





Both are 2-door cars.  But the red/white car is a hardtop, and the yellow car is a sedan.





A couple of spaces down sat the third '55, this one being a 2-door sedan.  This car has been more extensively modified than the others.





Personally, I love the subtle "ghost" flames .  .  .


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« Reply #9 on: August 10, 2013, 11:17:21 PM »

Interspersed among the Bowties sat several really nice Fords.  This is a 1968 Ford Torino GT.  Power comes from Ford's 390 CID V-8. 





Ford really did the "fastback" styling quite well in those days.  I've always loved the car's lines.





Turning the corner took me to more Fords.  From left-to-right, we have a white 1967 Fairlane, a turquois 1964 Fairlane 500, and a white 1963 Galaxie 500.





Even though the '67 isn't a super-rare 427 car, the '64 isn't a Thunderbolt, and the '63 isn't an R-Code car, all three were V-8 powered and beautifully restored .  .  .


« Last Edit: August 24, 2013, 10:45:26 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2013, 12:01:50 AM »

The classic Jaguar E-Type is always a favorite.  The turn signals mounted below the front bumper combined with the 4.2L I-6 engine identify this car as a Series II, produced from 1969-1971.





The E-Type reminds me a lot of the original Lincoln Continental produced from 1940-1948.  Both cars are strikingly beautiful, especially the convertible versions.  However, the rolling sculpture exterior covered a chassis full of questionable engineering and reliability concerns.  In the Continental's case, everything about the car was first-rate EXCEPT for the engine which quickly developed a reputation for having oiling system problems, (which resulted in premature bottom end failures), and cooling system problems, (which resulted in overheating and everything that goes along with it).  The opposite was true for the E-Type.  The car's engine was practically bulletproof.  The Lucas electrical system components, however, were not, (to say the least !).  The following excerpts from this North Carolina State University page summarizes everything perfectly: 

~  The Lucas motto: "Get home before dark."
~  The three-position Lucas switch:  DIM, FLICKER and OFF.
~  Q - Why do the English drink warm beer?  A - Lucas made the refrigerators, too.
~  Lucas is an acronym for Loose Unsoldered Connections And Splices.

But they're sure beautiful to look at .  .  .


« Last Edit: August 11, 2013, 11:09:26 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #11 on: August 11, 2013, 01:57:35 AM »

Todd, I've got a story that I've never told about the old Pontiacs in the 60s, mainly because the so called "history books" don't mention it, but I know it happened and I know it from the person I trust most in the world (my dad). He worked on them, drove them and salvaged them when they were wrecked.
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« Reply #12 on: August 11, 2013, 11:03:03 AM »

Todd, I've got a story that I've never told about the old Pontiacs in the 60s, mainly because the so called "history books" don't mention it, but I know it happened and I know it from the person I trust most in the world (my dad). He worked on them, drove them and salvaged them when they were wrecked.

Why do you gotta leave us hanging, Lee?  What's the story with the old Pontiacs?   

Nice car show, Todd.  I love that LS powered 80 Z28  butt rock
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« Reply #13 on: August 11, 2013, 11:51:01 AM »

Todd, I've got a story that I've never told about the old Pontiacs in the 60s, mainly because the so called "history books" don't mention it, but I know it happened and I know it from the person I trust most in the world (my dad). He worked on them, drove them and salvaged them when they were wrecked.


Why do you gotta leave us hanging, Lee?  What's the story with the old Pontiacs?   



Yes Lee, do tell.  This sounds like an interesting story .  .  .






Nice car show, Todd.  I love that LS powered 80 Z28  butt rock



Thanks Dave !  I almost bought a mint 1980 Z28 in the early 1990s.  I've always loved those cars .  .  .
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« Reply #14 on: August 12, 2013, 01:26:53 AM »

The Chevrolet Camaro has been selected to pace the Indianapolis 500 a total of 7 times to date.  In the Camaro's introductory year of 1967, several sources list 103 Pace Car replicas being built.  Although, more recent information suggests the number of replicas could actually be closer to 300 cars.  Either way, a genuine '67 Pace Car replica is extremely rare. 

In 1969, customers who ordered RPO Z11 "Indy 500 Pace Car Accents" got white RS/SS Camaro Convertible with a white top, special orange Houndstooth interior, and various other trim and body accents.  A small-block 350 or big-block 396 could be fitted under the hood.  A total of 3,675 cars were produced.

More than 6,000 Pace Car replicas were produced for the Camaro's next visit to Indy in 1982.  Eleven years later, another 645 Pace Car replicas were produced for the Camaro's 1993 outing.  There was no Camaro Pace Car replica in 2009 because there was no 2009 Camaro.  The newly revived Camaro went on sale in April 2009 as a 2010 model.  This means the 25 pre-production cars used for the Indy festivities are it !  The Camaro paced the event again in 2010.  Since the car officially existed by then, GM produced around 200 Pace Car replicas.

The all new Camaro Convertible was selected to pace the 100th anniversary of the Indianapolis 500 in 2011.  The convertible's return allowed Chevrolet to pay tribute to the 1969 Camaro Convertible Pace Car replica.  All the 2011 cars were produced with a white/orange color combination similar to that used on the 1969 cars. 





The 1969 car on the right in the photo above is a genuine Z11 car as indicated by the trim tag.





The tag breaks down as follows:

~  ST 69 12467 identifies this car as a 1969 Camaro Convertible with a V-8
~  NOR indicates that this car was built at the Norwood, Ohio assembly plant.  Pace Car replicas were built only at the Norwood and Van Nuys assembly plants.
~  321247BDY is the Fisher Body number
~  TR 720 indicates the interior trim color, Orange Houndstooth.  This is very significant because Orange Houndstooth was not available in a convertible except for the Pace Car replica.
~  50 A PNT indicates the body and roof colors, respectively.  Body color 50 is Dover White, and A stands for a white convertible top.
~  05A indicates the build date, in this case the first week of May.  This is also significant because all Pace Car replicas were built between 02D (4th week of February) and 05A (1st week of May).
~  Z11 identifies this car as a genuine Pace Car Replica.  This code appears only on Norwood cars.  On Van Nuys cars, authenticity can still be verified through the interior trim color code.  Any ST 69 12467 car with TR 720 interior is a Pace Car replica .  .  .
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