theautolounge.net
January 18, 2018, 09:32:46 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: SMF - Just Installed!
 
  Home   Forum   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4
  Print  
Author Topic: Todd's favorite car dealerships . . .  (Read 31035 times)
MontereyDave
Grand Master
******
Posts: 1475



View Profile
« Reply #15 on: June 15, 2013, 10:55:01 PM »

Those are some more sweet classic land yachts.  I suppose my favorite was the 76 Fleetwood for $6K but the Lincolns are nice, too.  Seeing that triple yellow Cadillac reminded me a crazy stunt when I was in 8th grade.  Some buddies fed a cat ExLax and put it into the principal's triple yellow 75 Coupe de Ville.  We later found out that the cat crapped itself to death.  I can't imagine how much damage it must've done to that beautiful interior.
Logged

Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #16 on: June 19, 2013, 02:04:57 AM »

continued .  .  .
Part 6 of 7





Now that I've made my way to the one side of the showroom, I headed toward the opposite side via the back wall.





This is a really nice 1961 Jaguar Mark 2.  The odometer showed 91k original miles and the asking price was $17,995.





Behind the Jag sat a nice 1972 Mercedes 380SL with 88k miles on the odometer.  Asking price was a pretty decent $9,995.





The Shelby Cobra is one of the most "replicated" cars you'll ever see.  The now defunct Kelm Company out of Nebraska built Cobra replicas in the 1970s.  This car was advertised as one of the company's early products.  Asking price was $22,995, which is actually pretty cheap, considering what Factory5 or Superformance Cobras cost.





This 1972 Mercedes-Benz 280SE was beautiful, even with the 145k miles on the odometer !





Asking price was a decent $8,995.





Next to the 'Benz sat a nice 1987 Jaguar XJ6 with 115k miles on the odometer.  Asking price was $9,995.





The Chevrolet Nomad Wagon has become an icon of sorts, almost universally admired and appreciated.  For 1957, 6,103 were produced.  This was a restomod car equipped with a modern 350 CID V-8, 700R4 automatic transmission, disc brakes, and a slightly lowered stance.  Asking price was $35,995.





This 2001 Chevy Monte Carlo race car was listed for $33,000.


« Last Edit: October 06, 2015, 11:50:03 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #17 on: June 21, 2013, 02:01:27 AM »

continued .  .  .
Part 7 of 7





For the 1958 model year, Ford's universally appreciated masterpiece known as the original Thunderbird gained a couple more seats, and a bunch more sheet metal and chrome.  It also gained more customers.  First generation sales numbered just over 53,000 units sold for 1955-1957 model years.  Sales of the second generation 1958-1960 "Square Bird" cars almost quadrupled that figure with more than 196,000 units.  This is a 1960 model with 67k original miles on the odometer.  Asking price was $12,995.





Here's something you don't see every day.  This is a 1973 Hunter Compact 2 camper in really nice condition.  The "Compact 2" designation indicates that it will sleep two people.  Asking price was $3,595.





I kept walking along the back row checking out the cars against the wall (on my right), eventually passing the row of Corvettes where I started (on my left).  Next to the 'Vettes sat a bunch of street rods with a couple of open wheel race cars thrown in for good measure.





The silver Mustang on the left in the photo above caught my eye.  It's a beautiful 1971 Mach I equipped with a numbers-matching 429 CJ V-8.  Asking price for the professionally restored car was $39,995.





Another row of street rods.





This 1923 Ford T-Bucket on the end looked quite well done, and was listed for $18,995.





Next to the street rods sat the Mustang row.  Just like they do with Corvettes, Gateway always keeps a good supply of Mustangs in inventory.





Just past the Mustang row is where the inventory ended.  Gateway offers long term storage, (the vehicle under the car cover in the photo below was being stored).  Those vehicles are kept away from the consigned cars, mainly on this side of the showroom.  





Nestled among the trucks were a couple of nice limousines each priced at $6,595.  The car on the left is a RWD 1984 Cadillac Limo with 28k original miles.  The car on the right is a FWD 1986 Cadillac Limo with 68k original miles.





On my way back toward the entrance, I checked out a couple of race cars.  Asking price for this stunning 1963 Corvette drag car was $80,000.





And finally, I finished today's tour with this 1950 Indy Roadster.  





Walt Ader drove this car in the 1950 Indianapolis 500, where he finished 22nd.  This photo is from the Indianapolis Motor Speedway website.



Click for more info !


Power comes from the iconic twin-cam Offenhauser I-4.  The "Offy" has been called the greatest racing engine of all time because of its dominance from the mid-1930s into the mid-1970s.





In the 1950s, the displacement was right around 252 cubic inches.  With 15:1 compression, power output was somewhere in the 420 hp range.  Mechanically, it was simple in design, yet extremely durable.  Visually, it was a work of art.  





According to this enginelabs.com article, the Offy won A LOT   of races.  For 17 consecutive years (1947-1964), Offy-powered cars won the Indy 500, and took all three podium positions   from 1950 - 1960.





Asking price on this piece of history was quite steep as expected, at $160,000.





I would visit Gateway Classic Cars several more times during my stay in Missouri.  Eventually, I'll get those pics posted as well.  So stay tuned.

Thanks for reading .  .  .
« Last Edit: October 06, 2015, 11:50:19 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

MontereyDave
Grand Master
******
Posts: 1475



View Profile
« Reply #18 on: June 23, 2013, 01:05:36 PM »

I love that silver $40k 429 Mach 1!  That 72 280SE is nice, too.  That lightweight 73 Hunter camper would likely fetch twice as much if it were in California.  I imagine that historic Indy Offy racecar could easily surpass that asking price at one of the Monterey auctions in August during the annual historic races.
Logged

Fluxx
Grand Master
******
Posts: 1901


Lasciate Ogni Speranza


View Profile
« Reply #19 on: June 23, 2013, 04:07:47 PM »

The Mach 1 seems pretty reasonable when you look at what 69/70 big block cars go for. When I was in Twentynine Palms there was an older Australian gal that had one that would walk my Trans Am with little effort.
Logged
Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #20 on: September 07, 2013, 11:38:35 PM »

MotoExotica, Fenton, Missouri .  .  .
December 16, 2005





I discovered MotoExotica through one of my many online car searches.  It sits just on the western side of the I-270 Beltway that surrounds the city of St. Louis where it meets I-44.  This location was about 120 interstate miles from my driveway in Columbia.  My wife and I decided to take a tour right before Christmas 2005.



Click to visit their website !


The property reminds me of an old commercial business or warehouse based on the way it is laid out.  There is a gated parking area that leads to what looks like an old loading dock.  The actual "offices" seen above are located out of view to the right in the photo below.  





I remember MotoExotica as a decent sized collector car dealership.  But I seem to recall that before I left Missouri in 2009, it shrunk quite significantly, which made me wonder if something was up.  Today, it seems that they not only survived those times, but have grown quite a bit since, (they have around 160 vehicles in inventory as of this writing).  A lot of sales occur via Ebay.

MotoExotica was always one of my favorite sites to surf.  Their inventory has always struck me as very unusual.  I've seen Japanese Jinrickshas, a pre-war Renault city bus from Paris, a Jacobson industrial lawn mower with a cutting width of 18 feet, a bunch of movie cars, and vehicles owned by celebrities.  Along with the expected "collector cars," owner Scott has always managed to throw something in the mix that makes you do a double-take.    

My favorite aspect is that the "Sold Cars" section of their website not only retains the entire ad, it also shows the price for which the vehicle actually sold.  This is a great tool for the potential buyer, who now has the ability to get an idea of what a vehicle sells for in advance.  And as I would browse through the numbers, I was really surprised at just how reasonable a lot of them seemed to be.  

For example, my wife and I made the trip on that day because I was interested in a 1986 Jaguar XJ-S shown on the website for $4,495.  



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


It wasn't a perfect car.  But, it seemed pretty nice for $4,495.  Owner Scott then told me that if I wanted it, I could have it for $3,495 !  And, he wasn't kidding.  The "Sold Cars" page indicates that someone bought it for $3,550.  


 


The inside of the building reminded me even more of a warehouse.  But overall decor of old gas pumps, vintage photos, antique bicycles, and other memorabilia did a good job of distracting me from that image.





And if that didn't do the trick, the Ferrari 308 certainly did.





This is a 1984 Ferrari 308 GTSi.  Listed for $34,900, it sold for $28,995.



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


And as you might expect, the 1948 Buick Roadmaster caught my eye also.  The low light makes the car look black.  But it is actually a dark green color.  Listed for $25,995, it sold for $22,500.  This is one of 20,649 "Sedanets" produced that year.  





This mildly customized 1957 Chevy Bel Air was listed for $18,495, and sold for $16,185.  



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


This is one of the previously mentioned Jinrickshas.  Unlike a traditional two-wheeled rickshaw, this "Bath Wagon," (named after where it was made in Bath, England), has three wheels, and is pushed from behind with the occupant steering.  Asking price for the circa 1880 wagon at the time was $1,200.



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


While researching the "Bath Wagon," I happened upon THIS ARTICLE from The Saratogian newspaper out of Saratoga Springs, New York.  The wagon above appears to have been purchased by the Ulysses S. Grant Cottage State Historical Site in Wilton, New York.  This particular Bath Wagon is period correct to what President Grant would have used in the days before his death in 1885.  

I headed through a doorway into another room of cars.





This 1972 AMC Javelin SST was listed for $9,495, and sold for $6,350.  A little more than 23,000 were made that year.



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


Keen eyes will notice the Lincoln Convertible in the photo above, and probably realize that I wanted to drive it home.  This is a beautiful 1967 model, the last year for the 4-door retractable roof convertible.



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


This is one of 2,276 convertibles Lincoln produced that year.





This is where selling via Ebay has its benefits.  The listed price at that time for this car was $12,495.  I remember seeing that and thinking that was quite cheap.  When the car sold, it did so for $18,700.  I wish I would have been able to buy it when I saw it.





This is a 1948 Cadillac Series 62.  It was listed for $14,495 and sold for $10,500.



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !
« Last Edit: October 06, 2015, 11:54:03 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #21 on: September 08, 2013, 03:32:57 PM »

This is a front engine rail dragster.





I don't know the details.  But, it is small-block Chevy powered.  Looks like fun.





This is a 1982 Porsche 911 SC with 85k miles, some minor mods, and some minor issues.  Asking price was $13,495, and it sold for $14,190.



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


This 1965 Mustang Fastback was listed as a 19k original mile car with lots of documentation.  Asking price was $34,900, and it sold for $30,000.



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


This is a 51k mile 1955 Ford Thunderbird.  Asking price was $32,495, and it sold for $32,000.



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


I've always been a fan of the later C3 body Corvette.  This 31k mile 1979 Corvette looked great in Yellow. 



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


Asking price was $15,995, and it sold for $14,300, which is a bargain for a 31k original mile car if you ask me.


« Last Edit: September 10, 2013, 12:19:25 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #22 on: September 10, 2013, 01:44:24 AM »

The Goggomobil was a microcar produced in the German state of Bavaria from 1955 - 1969.  Originally a product of the Glas automobile company, (1955 - 1965), it became a BMW product when BMW purchased Glas in 1966.  This particular car is a 1967 TS 250 Coupe.



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


As you would expect, it isn't called a "microcar" for no reason.  Everything   about this car is tiny.  Power  -  and I use that term loosely  -  comes from a rear mounted air-cooled 2-cylinder 2-stroke engine that produces 13.6 hp.  Even with a curb weight of 915 pounds, 0 to 47-mph-top-speed takes just over 27 seconds.  Bumper-to-bumper, this car measures less than 10 feet in length.  Yet somehow, there is room  -  and I use that term loosely also  -  for 4 passengers on the inside.





The TS coupe series rolls on some impressive "10s" .  .  .





The whole "microcar" or "city hopper" concept just never caught on in the US.  There has never been, and still isn't any real need for it.  In Europe, however, the microcar does quite well in the major cities where parking issues are common, and the price of gas is so high.  Almost 285,000 Goggomobil sedans, coupes, and vans were produced from 1955 - 1969.  Seeing one stateside doesn't happen too often.  The asking price on this 51k original mile car was $14,495, and it sold for $12,500.





Next to the Goggomobil microcar sat a very nice 1931 Ford Roadster.



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


Power comes from a blown 291 CID 1955 DeSoto Hemi V-8, which itself is a sight to behold.





Asking price on this all-steel car was $45,000, which is also what it sold for.





Cadillac produced somewhere in the neighborhood of 2,000 Series 75 Limousines in 10 different body configurations in 1941.  Asking price on this very nice example was $19,000 which would have been a great deal judging by the $25,700 sale price.



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


This 1947 Ford Convertible street rod was nicely done and featured a very extensive custom sound system.  Asking price was $44,495, and it sold for $40,000.



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !
Logged

Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #23 on: September 12, 2013, 12:34:52 AM »

I've always liked the big 1970s Pontiacs.  A neighbor had a 1973 Grand Ville Convertible when I was in high school.  I had the chance to take it for a drive one afternoon, top down of course.  Even for a car produced near the beginning of the "emissions era," the 455 under the hood of that car still felt muscular with a lot of bottom end Oomph.  Great car.

This 1972 Pontiac Catalina Convertible was also 455-powered, and was one of only 2,399 produced that year.  



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


Asking price for the 120k mile car was $10,995.  It sold for $9,800, which I think would have been a great deal.





This 1966 Buick Wildcat Custom Convertible is one of 2,790 produced that year.  Power comes from Buick's bulletproof 401 CID "Nailhead" V-8 that made 325 hp and 445 ft-lbs of torque.



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


The asking price on this 54k original mile car was only $7,495, which struck me an incredible deal.  There were some rust bubbles beginning to appear on the rockers and the bottom of each rear quarter panel.  The underhood area wasn't detailed, but was complete and original in its appearance.  The interior showed typical wear and tear, but was all there.  In other words, this was not a perfect car, but an original car.  It ended up selling for $9,500.  I'd own it for that price !





Another giant Cadillac  -  this one is a 1949 Series 62.  Just like the 1948 Cadillac from above, the low light inside the building makes this car appear black.  The actual color is more of a deep plum.  Very cool !



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


The red interior worked quiet well with the dark plum paint.  Asking price for this "restored" car was $16,900, and it sold for $15,500.  





This 1957 Chevy Bel Air has been modded quite a bit, and very well done.  



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


Power comes from a modified big-block V-8 that displaces 427 CID.  I like the fact that it has a/c and power brakes.  The asking price was $42,495, and it sold for $38,000.


Logged

Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #24 on: September 15, 2013, 01:56:02 PM »

"Kit Car" is a rather polarizing term.  The concept can be quite exciting.  I, as an enthusiast, get to "build a car," and customize it as I see fit.  I am limited only by the depth of my pockets.  A Factory 5 Racing Roadster, for example, is an extremely well engineered work of art that can be driven like any other vehicle.  It is also a high dollar machine. 

The other side to this argument is the fact that the final outcome depends on the skill of the builder.  A lot of these machines are exactly what you envision  -  a cheap imitation of something else that is assembled and finished by an amateur.  A car like this will look pretty good until you get close enough to notice the not-so-favorable details.  The VW Beetle running gear won't help excite the senses either. 

Jim Kellison began building kit car bodies in the 1950s with racing in mind.  His high quality fiberglass J-4 body, introduced in 1957, was designed to be bolted to a contemporary Corvette chassis.  Customers could also purchase a bare body that could be affixed to whatever he/she was racing.  The addition of Indy car chassis builder Chuck Manning to the company meant Kellison products could be had with a tube ladder frame, and later on a tube X-frame.  They were expensive  -  a turnkey J-4 cost around $6,700 in 1960  -  but they were exceptionally well engineered high-quality racing machines. 

The J-4 was replaced by the J-5.  Refinements centered around ingress/egress.  The roofline was raised slightly, and the wheelbase was lengthened making the cabin a little larger. 

The car shown here is a Kellison J-5 from 1966.  Power comes from a 400 hp 5.7L Chevrolet V-8.  Asking price was $19,995, and it eventually sold for $24,900.  Click HERE to read more about Kellison automobiles .  .  .



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !
Logged

Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #25 on: September 15, 2013, 02:49:32 PM »

Henry J. Kaiser had his hands in just about everything.  He built ships during WWII (Kaiser Shipyards), produced aluminum (Kaiser Aluminum), and steel (Kaiser Steel), and established a health care plan for his workers (Kaiser Permanente).  Later, he dabbled in professional sports (briefly owning the Denver Broncos NFL franchise), and explored the worlds of leisure travel, (founded what is now the Hilton Hawaiian Village), and broadcast television and radio (Kaiser Broadcasting).  Kaiser was eager to get into the post WWII automobile business.  He and automobile enthusiast Joseph Frazier formed The Kaiser-Frazier Corporation in 1945, (which became Kaiser Motors in 1953).  K-F produced automobiles under the Frazier brand from 1947 - 1951, and under the Kaiser brand from 1947 - 1955.  Through a series of buyouts and mergers, automobile brands Kaiser, Frazier, Willys, Graham, Henry J, Allstate, Jeep, AMC, and AM General are all related in some way or another.  

The Kaiser brand is mostly associated with the stunning Darrin roadster from 1954.  But, its bread and butter was a full line of pedestrian sedans and wagons.  This particular car is a 1951 Kaiser Deluxe 2-door sedan, one of approximately 11,000 produced.  Total Deluxe production is estimated to be around 89,000 units.  Asking price for this "restored" car was $12,495, which doesn't seem too bad to me.  The selling price was downright cheap at $7,700 !  I'd own it for that price .  .  .



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !
« Last Edit: September 15, 2013, 11:26:17 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #26 on: September 16, 2013, 12:37:32 AM »

The Ford Thunderbird has always been a favorite, especially the convertibles.  This is a triple-white 1964 Thunderbird Convertible, one of only 9,198 produced that year.



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


Ford always did a great job with the T-Bird's interior, (I particularly like the wrap-around rear seats).  This car has the Swing-Away steering column, (with the car in park, the whole steering column would move to the right 9 inches to allow for easier ingress/egress).  The asking price for this 82k mile car was $19,495, and it sold for $18,000.





This 1980 Datsun 280ZX is a special car for two reasons.  First, it is a rare 10th Anniversary model.  Of the 3,000 anniversary cars produced, around 2,500 of them had this black/gold paint scheme.  Second, the original owner was none other than comedian Jerry Lewis.  Asking price for the fully documented 67k mile car was $11,495, and it sold for a rather cheap $8,990.



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


The full-sized Jaguar sedan, designated the "Mark" series, has been around since 1946.  The car's beautiful lines were reminiscent of the 1930s featuring long hoods, swooping fenders, and a beautiful upright chrome grill topped with "The Leaper" cat.  The inside of the car was fitted with the traditional hand crafted high quality interior complete with a real wood dash.  Unfortunately, underneath all that beauty was a chassis that my Complete Book of Collectible Cars calls, "An archaic  -  even by the late '40s  -  leaf spring/live axle suspension" in both front and rear.   

Tremendous strides had been made by the time the Mark IX arrived for 1959.  Power steering and 4-wheel disc brakes were now standard equipment, (one of the first production cars to be so equipped).  This 1961 model would be the last year for the Mark IX, (replaced by the Mark X in 1962).



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


Power comes from a 3.8L version of Jaguar's DOHC I-6 that makes an impressive for the era 220 hp.





The interior is typical Jaguar  -  beautifully designed and assembled using lots of Connolly Leather and real wood.  By 1961, the "Sunshine Roof" had also become standard equipment.  If you ask me, the Kenwood stereo looks out of place.





Asking price for the 55k original mile car was $27,995, and it sold for $27,900 .  .  .
« Last Edit: September 16, 2013, 12:39:52 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #27 on: September 17, 2013, 09:54:58 AM »

I saw a couple of 1959 Cadillacs in inventory.  This car is a Series 62 hardtop advertised as an original car with one repaint in the original color.  Overall, the car wasn't perfect, but quite nice.  Asking price was $14,995, and it sold for a pretty reasonable $11,000.



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


Across the parking lot sat another Series 62 hardtop, this car being advertised as having the original paint, but recovered seats.  Asking price was a very reasonable $9,995, and it sold for $13,890.



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !


Hiking from one Cadillac to the other, I had to pass by this good looking 1969 Camaro.  The outside of the car wasn't perfect, but it was original in appearance, something I prefer.  The original small-block has been replaced with a modified 454 big-block.  Any first generation Camaro holds it's value exceptionally well.  Asking price on this car was $22,495.  Selling price was a quite reasonable $15,895.



Click for the "Sold Cars" profile !
Logged

MontereyDave
Grand Master
******
Posts: 1475



View Profile
« Reply #28 on: September 17, 2013, 03:24:55 PM »

Todd, your mention of the 1954 Kaiser Darrin roadster reminded me of this one I saw during car week in Monterey in August.  The unique sliding door design would have been great for preventing door dings if the design had caught on.



Logged

Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #29 on: September 18, 2013, 01:06:57 AM »

That's a beautiful car !  The Darrin is a rare machine.  Only 435 were produced in its one-year-only model run of 1954 .  .  .
Logged

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.2 © 2008-2009
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!