theautolounge.net
January 18, 2018, 09:23:18 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: SMF - Just Installed!
 
  Home   Forum   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4
  Print  
Author Topic: Yard Work Season 2013 has begun . . .  (Read 15902 times)
Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #30 on: May 19, 2013, 12:29:36 AM »

Part XII  -  Heading into summer .  .  .
May 11, 2013





By now, most everything that was supposed to bloom this spring has done so.  The bright colors have been replaced with an abundance of green.  I use the term "most everything" because the only items that didn't produce a bloom of any kind were the bulbs a friend of mine gave me last year.  I broke them apart, planted them, and waited.  They grew like crazy, but just didn't produce any flowers.





But they're growing quite well.  I'm not really sure what to do with them at this point.  Do I cut them back ?  I have no idea.  I'll leave them be for now. 

The rest of the yard, however, will not be so fortunate today.  I had mentioned earlier that when the blooming season ends, my plan was to give the Azaleas in front a good pruning.  That, coupled with removing any weeds and vines growing around/within the shrubs will hopefully stimulate some new growth.  And as long as the battery in the hedge trimmer stays charged, I'm going to put it to work.  The three smaller Azaleas furthest from the street needed a good shaping more than anything. 





So, I grabbed the hedge trimmer and got to work.





I cut, shaped, and weeded as best I could.  They may not look like much at this moment.  Future spring blooming seasons will, hopefully, be different.





The combo next to the street got a good pruning.  I don't want to hack it up too much.  Eventually, I want to scale this monster back so I can see over it as I pull out of the driveway.  If I do it a little at a time, maybe I won't shock it too much.





The October Glory Maple is doing well.





As is the Cleveland Select Flowering Pear.





Incidentally, I apologize for the excessive amount of blurry pictures.  Why this is happening is a mystery to me.  I've noticed that on many occasions with this camera lately.  This obviously points toward a significant degree of operator error.  But I have yet to narrow it down.

Anyways, the Japanese Camellia and Flowering Dogwood are all green now. 





You can see in the photo below that one of the branches on the dogwood appears to be a little on the "dead" side.  Although not part of my pruning activities today, I'm wondering if I can cut the two almost horizontal branches completely off.  The tree will still be leaning, but may not appear as bad depending on where you stand.





I hacked away at the two large shrubs in front of the house by the garage.  When we first arrived in Athens, these two had grown completely together. 


April 18, 2009



I got them somewhat separated, but like the Azaleas by the street, I need to scale them back a little more.  In time .  .  .





A lot of new growth can be seen on the Eleanor Taber Indian Hawthorn.





But my rose bush is turning out to be the biggest surprise of the season. 





Back in February, aside from one lone bloom as a result a few warm days, it looked like it was still asleep.


February 9, 2013



Night Foreman Larry suggested that I prune it slightly to stimulate new growth, which I did.  The results were really impressive.





I've got a bunch of flowers on deck.





Sometime over the summer, this tree that I still haven't got around to identifying will bloom.





The bark on this tree is quite distinctive


April 20, 2009



Anyone have any ideas ?


April 20, 2009



I trimmed the shrubs in front of the house and tried to make them look somewhat neat and tidy. 





The shrub on the right in the photo below appears to be some kind of holly, the exact variety of which is unknown.  But whatever it is, it's growing quite well completely on its own. 





And I mean completely  by itself.  I didn't put it there.  You can clearly see in the photo below from March 2010 that there was nothing growing in that location.  I don't know where it came from, or how it got there.  But it's growing.


March 19, 2010



The Sweet Gum tree goes from dormant to fully green in just a few short weeks.





Despite the grenades it drops everywhere, I really like it.





The Javelin Rush grass and Bridal Wreath Spiraea have visibly grown quite a bit since I planted them back on March 17.  This has me a bit concerned.





I looked at the tags for those plants again.  The Bridal Wreath Spiraea could possibly grow to around 5 feet tall and 5 feet wide.  The 6 Javelin Rush plants can each grow to near 5 feet tall, but only about 2 feet wide.  This means it looks like the Heavenly Bamboo may have to go at some point later on, which, in itself, can be quite a challenging task.  Believe it or not, I've already cut this Nandina plant completely down to the ground once before, and it, obviously, grew back.





After the mass pruning and mowing, I'm happy with what I have. 





Once done in front, I did the same thing in the back yard.  The great thing about the grass in back is that it doesn't really "grow" like a typical lawn, which makes me wonder if it's some kind of ornamental grass.  This will probably be the only time I mow it this season.  Whatever it is, I'm quite happy.





I was talking to my other neighbor, who is also really gifted when it comes to gardening.  As a result of that conversation, I now know that my planting activities aren't quite finished .  .  .
« Last Edit: May 21, 2013, 01:31:07 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

Rather B.Blown
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 1820



View Profile
« Reply #31 on: May 22, 2013, 12:15:52 AM »

Part XII  -  Heading into summer .  .  .
May 11, 2013



Sometime over the summer, this tree that I still haven't got around to identifying will bloom.





The bark on this tree is quite distinctive


April 20, 2009



Anyone have any ideas ?


April 20, 2009




I want to say it looks like a Crepe Myrtle, but if it is, its the biggest one I've ever seen!! They bloom in mid summer and then get little berry looking things on them. I've got several small ones in a couple parts of the yard. Mine are red, but they come in pink and white too I think, and maybe purple.

Here's mine last year. Most people keep them cut back so it forms a bush shape above the trunk. I've seen a lot bigger than mine (mine have only been out a few years and cut them back every spring) but not one as big as yours that I recall.






And here's a link with a pic of the trunk, looks a lot like yours.


http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/crepe-myrtle/bark-shedding-crepe-myrtle.htm


.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2013, 01:53:35 AM by Rather B.Blown » Logged



Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #32 on: May 22, 2013, 01:39:30 AM »

Part XIII  -  Some fine tuning .  .  .
May 18, 2013





I'm fortunate to be surrounded by neighbors who actually know what they're doing in the garden.  Through my conversations with them, I've managed to learn quite a bit about this "gardening" thing.  I asked questions and tried to apply whatever advice was presented whether it addressed something like plant identification, how and when to prune, or any other seemingly insignificant tidbits that came my way.  My goal has been to learn from them and apply that knowledge to my yard.  Sounds pretty simple, but this is me we're talking about. 

But I think I've done alright.  The rose bush in front of the house, for example, looks great.  Last week, one bloom was beginning to appear.  Today, I see an actual flower !





I've got one flower open and a bunch more on deck.








My mom and dad are probably looking down on me and wondering what happened.  I would also be willing to bet that both really confused.  If that's the case, I've done well.





I've commented previously on how beneficial "reading the tag" has been for me this year.  Information like the recommended amount of sunlight or how much water a plant requires is there for a reason.  However, the key, here, is the phrase, "this year." 

This was not the case last year when I planted a few things out front.  I focused primarily on the recommended amount of sunlight and water indicated on the tags.  In that respect, all is well. 

Enter the above mentioned conversations with my neighbors.  A couple weeks ago, I was chatting with my next door neighbor.  When the two Leyland Cypress shrubs entered the conversation, (specifically, where I planted them), she mentioned that they were, "probably going to get really big."  I sense some good advice being given.





Last week, I was chatting with my neighbor across the street about nothing specific.  He casually mentioned that planting those shrubs right next to the steps and front door, "may not have been a good idea," thus reinforcing what my next door neighbor said.  I looked through my receipts and found the tags for the Leyland Cypress shrubs.  The "average size" is listed as 50 feet tall    and 15 feet wide !    Using the photo above for reference, I don't see my front steps, front door, or any nearby windows being of much use.  Although great for keeping people at bay, overall functionality may suffer.

I know both shrubs have to be moved.  The question is where.  After a bunch of aimless wandering, I decided to move one shrub to an open area near the driveway and front walk. 





The other shrub can be moved into the yard closer to the Sweet Gum tree.  There is ample room in both areas to accommodate the projected height and width.





The hardest part of this adventure will be getting the root ball out of the ground without doing a whole lot of damage.  If I can do that, the rest of the dig/remove/transport/re-install process should be ok.  Thankfully, both came out of the ground with minimal effort.








Once planted, I formed a basin to collect water and added a layer of mulch.








Now, I'm left with a sad looking area by the front steps. 





In place of the Leyland Cypress shrubs will go a pair of Gold Breeze Miscanthus plants.





You can tell from the photo above that a Gold Breeze Miscanthus is a type of ornamental grass, similar to the Javelin Rush by the mailbox and the Pampas Grass by the back patio.  Full sun to part shade is preferred.  The tag says that a height of 4 feet can be expected, which would work perfectly beside the steps.  Once they reach a decent size, feathery gold plumes can be expected each August. 

After removing the weeds from the immediate area, each plant went in the ground.





I decided to try something that my next door neighbor suggested, and use some landscaping fabric to deter weed growth.





A layer of mulch works well as a cover for the fabric.





I think this will work just fine.





In a few years, my yard should look very different .  .  .








« Last Edit: May 22, 2013, 11:07:00 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

LSixer
Grand Master
******
Posts: 3386


Resident asshole of TAL


View Profile
« Reply #33 on: May 22, 2013, 03:40:26 PM »

Part XIII  -  Some fine tuning .  .  .
May 18, 2013


Last week, I was chatting with my neighbor across the street about nothing specific.  He casually mentioned that planting those shrubs right next to the steps and front door, "may not have been a good idea," thus reinforcing what my next door neighbor said.  I looked through my receipts and found the tags for the Leyland Cypress shrubs.  The "average size" is listed as 50 feet tall    and 15 feet wide !    Using the photo above for reference, I don't see my front steps, front door, or any nearby windows being of much use.  Although great for keeping people at bay, overall functionality may suffer.


You didnt want that front entrance way anyway now did you? He He



I know both shrubs have to be moved.  The question is where.  After a bunch of aimless wandering, I decided to move one shrub to an open area near the driveway and front walk. 


lmao


I would have suggested these Todd, for your porch sides.





I think this picture is chopped, but, they can still look like this.
Logged

Rather B.Blown
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 1820



View Profile
« Reply #34 on: May 23, 2013, 08:21:26 PM »

Todd, did you see my post about your unidentified tree?
Logged



Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #35 on: May 24, 2013, 12:15:10 AM »

You didnt want that front entrance way anyway now did you? He He


lmao


I would have suggested these Todd, for your porch sides.





I think this picture is chopped, but, they can still look like this.



You know, the idea of deterring people does have its merits.  Plus, I could have let the Leyland Cypress shrubs grow huge and completely obscure the porch and front door.  That way, people will think my house was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright.

I also like the idea of a Japanese Maple.  They seem to be quite low maintenance.  Maybe I should put one somewhere .  .  .





Todd, did you see my post about your unidentified tree?


Yes I did Lee, and I thank you for your input !  I think you're right in calling it a Crape Myrtle.  Everything seems to match when I compare the link you posted with what I have. 


July 3, 2010



Although, determining the exact variety of Crape Myrtle may be a little more difficult.  There is a "Pink Velour" variety that may be close .  .  .
Logged

Rather B.Blown
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 1820



View Profile
« Reply #36 on: May 24, 2013, 12:46:00 AM »









Yes I did Lee, and I thank you for your input !  I think you're right in calling it a Crape Myrtle.  Everything seems to match when I compare the link you posted with what I have. 


July 3, 2010



Although, determining the exact variety of Crape Myrtle may be a little more difficult.  There is a "Pink Velour" variety that may be close .  .  .

Those little berry type things look just like the ones that come out on mine, usually late in the summer. And the ones on mine stay on there even after all the leaves fall off in the fall. Usually stay on there most of of the winter. They'll just be a naked bush with little clusters of those things still on there.
Logged



LSixer
Grand Master
******
Posts: 3386


Resident asshole of TAL


View Profile
« Reply #37 on: May 30, 2013, 04:08:52 PM »

I believe the japanese maples are pretty low maintenance. Like a good woman. He He

I finally managed to grab a shot of the flowering cherry at my old house. Although it is a crappy cell phone pic.

Logged

Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #38 on: June 08, 2013, 07:40:20 PM »

I believe the japanese maples are pretty low maintenance. Like a good woman. He He

I finally managed to grab a shot of the flowering cherry at my old house. Although it is a crappy cell phone pic.




This "Low Maintenance Woman" of which you speak .  .  .  I thought they existed only in legend.  I've never seen one.

Beautiful tree, by the way .  .  .
Logged

Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #39 on: June 09, 2013, 02:25:34 PM »

Part XIV  -  Additional maintenance .  .  .
May 25, 2013





I'm quite happy with the results of my Yard Work adventures that began 3 months ago. 





I won't be hosting my own show on HGTV at anytime in the future.  But I really enjoy my yard for no reason other than it's mine. 











The new arrangement at my front steps is doing well.  Some new growth can be seen on the Gold Breeze Miscanthus plants.





Lately, I've been quite frustrated with my camera.  When it takes a good picture, it's a really good picture.  My problems appear when the idiot using the camera can't make it work properly, (hence the recent outbreak of out-of-focus pics).  I have no idea what's going on.





When my ex-wife and I moved to Georgia in 2009, the small amount of house plants we had made the journey with us.  This little guy is one of them.





What you see above is exactly how it looked 4 years ago, which is also exactly how it looked for a while when we had it in Missouri.  I have had it sitting in what is called the "formal" living room in my house, an area that I never use.  With my foray into this world of gardening, it has come to my attention that this .  .  .





.  .  . look an awful lot like this .  .  .





Varieties of the Aucuba Japonica are commonly called Spotted Laurel, Gold Dust, and Mr. Goldstrike.  I have a bunch of it growing in two locations.  Since I know this type of plant will grow outside, I decided to take the chance and plant this guy in front of the house.





Maybe he'll be happier outside in front of the living room windows.





Previously, I posted pics of a small Azalea growing in the side yard opposite all the other Azaleas by the driveway.  I didn't know he was there until I saw flowers.


March 30, 2013



My initial reaction upon seeing it for the first time was whether or not it would be a good idea to move it out of the area that is completely overrun with Ivy.  I decided to take the chance and move it to where the other Azaleas are located by the driveway, specifically in the gap between the two sections of the Azalea 4th in line from the street, (i.e. the one I've had the most difficulty shaping and forming due to the amount of damage it has sustained over the years).  The gap in between the two main branches of the plant seemed like a good place for the transplant. 


May 11, 2013



After sawzall-ing my way through the ivy, I transplanted the small Azalea to a spot where, hopefully, it will not only grow better, but fill in an existing gap.  Once again, please excuse the lousy picture.  But you get the idea.





And as of this writing (June 9), both transplants are still green !  Keep your fingers crossed .  .  .
« Last Edit: June 09, 2013, 02:29:50 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #40 on: June 15, 2013, 11:23:06 PM »

Part XV  -  The Leaning Tower of Dogwood .  .  .
June 8, 2013





I've mentioned what I affectionately refer to as my "Leaning Tower of Dogwood" tree in the front yard on numerous occasions in the past.





How it came to look this way is a mystery.  I suspect that here and there, branches broke or were pruned (or both), probably by someone like myself, (i.e. having limited knowledge of the world of Botany).  But somehow, the tree developed a very pronounced lean to one side, which can be seen in the photo above. 

Three things are clear.  First, one large branch appears to be dying/mostly dead, as evidenced by the lack of any greenery.  Second, my neighbors agree with what Adam said earlier regarding the "suckers" at the base of the tree.  "You need to cut them off," is what my neighbor across the street told me.  And third, the longest, lowest-hanging, branch on the tree also happens to be the most horizontal, which becomes very clear when I am trying to mow the grass.  Something needs to be done here, I'm just not sure exactly what.

I directed this question to a coworker from the Botany Greenhouses across the parking lot from where I work, specifically, "How much pruning can a Flowering Dogwood tree take ?"  After explaining my situation, Charlie tells me that pruning a Dogwood is not a problem.  I should be ok removing the branches in question.  My neighbor across the street agreed, and showed me where to make the cut.

Out came the "gardening" tools.





First to go was the mostly dead branch.





The lowest hanging branch and the "suckers" at the base of the tree were next.





It doesn't look too bad.  The tree is still leaning, but the removal of the extreme branches makes the mind think it isn't as bad as it was.  This is precisely the effect I was aiming for.





I made a few more fine tuning cuts, mainly to remove more of the one stump, and I was done.





I spent the rest of the afternoon gathering all the other branches laying around the yard in preparation for next week's Leaf and Limb Collection.  The county says to pile your limbs and branches at the edge of your yard for pickup whenever your neighborhood is scheduled.





This was one of the larger piles I have had in recent memory .  .  .


Logged

LSixer
Grand Master
******
Posts: 3386


Resident asshole of TAL


View Profile
« Reply #41 on: June 18, 2013, 10:43:03 AM »

Wow. I would hang on to those larger branches. They make good burnin' for a cook out or a late season firepit to warm the air.

The doggie looks good though. Very nice.
Logged

Rather B.Blown
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 1820



View Profile
« Reply #42 on: June 18, 2013, 09:47:19 PM »

Wow. I would hang on to those larger branches. They make good burnin' for a cook out or a late season firepit to warm the air.

The doggie looks good though. Very nice.

Agreed. Todd, you need to build a fire pit out back somewhere around your patio, or at least get a nice chiminea to put out there. http://www.google.com/search?q=chiminea&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=nBrBUY2JDK3h4APBsIHYAw&sqi=2&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1348&bih=593

Nothing like building a little fire in the evening in the spring, fall, or hell, anytime and sitting around outside relaxing. The smell of the smoke, the crackling of the wood, the glow and the warmth, the burning ashes rising in the night sky. It goes back to man's basic instincts and its wonderful.
Logged



Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #43 on: June 19, 2013, 01:25:50 AM »

Thanks guys !  I've given the fire pit idea some thought in the past, but never acted on it.  The idea of sitting by the fire on a cool evening sounds quite attractive .  .  .
Logged

Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #44 on: June 27, 2013, 12:03:27 PM »

I think I may have spoken too soon.  One of the palm trees I planted in back is turning brown.  I suspect two things:  a) Georgia clay DOES NOT equal "well drained soil," and b) I don't think it's getting enough sunlight.  I may have to move it to the front yard .  .  .
Logged

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.2 © 2008-2009
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!