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Author Topic: Yard Work Season 2013 has begun . . .  (Read 15901 times)
Lone Fox
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« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2013, 11:46:58 PM »

Sounds like a good neighbor. One of my neighbors is a bit... strange. He is always bitchy; one day he said some words about how I don't care to support American workers because I drive a Honda. Not sure what point he was trying to make, what the guys/gals are doing in Washington is having a much greater negative affect than me buying a used Honda - that so happened to be built in Ohio while his Fusion was built in Mexico.

Sorry to high-jack your thread, and Yoshino Cherry Tree it so looks like.
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Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #16 on: April 11, 2013, 01:34:29 AM »

Part V  -  Trying this "planting stuff" thing again .  .  .
March 31, 2013





I may be tempting fate here.  But everything I have planted to this point has survived despite being in my care.  Historically, my yard has been a place where stuff comes to die, the proverbial "end of the line."  Do you have any relatives that you're not particularly fond of ?  Invite them to go camping in my yard.  They'll be dead in a week.  However, all signs seem to indicate a shift in this pattern has been occurring since last year.  

The project from yesterday (March 30) involved cleaning out the weeds by the Japanese Boxwoods by the patio, and putting down a layer of mulch.  I also picked up something called an Otto Luyken Cherry Laurel.  The small white flowers caught my eye while walking through Lowe's.  





I mentioned earlier that Lowe's can be a very dangerous place, especially this time of year.  I know better than to spend lots of time wandering through the store, allowing various thoughts to occupy my mind.  Yesterday, I came home with the Cherry Laurel.  Today (March 31), I headed back to Lowe's to pick up a couple more things that "caught my eye."  





I find with the roof down, my Porsche Utility Vehicle (PUV) handles the task of hauling stuff quite easily.  As seen in the photos, I have returned from Lowe's with a couple of palm trees.





I don't know what it is about palm trees that appeals to me.  But I've always had a thing for them.  Growing up in Pennsylvania, the only time I ever saw a palm tree was when I ventured into the south.  





The items that "caught my eye" were advertised as "Cold Hardy Palm Trees."  In Georgia, this means being able to withstand temperatures as low as 10 degrees Fahrenheit once established.  Winter nights in Athens can be quite cold, but not for any extended length of time.  In the 4 years since my arrival, I don't ever remember experiencing a 10 degree winter night.  If history can be used as a guide, I should be ok having a couple of palm trees in my yard.  Since I really like them, I decided to go for it.





The plant on the left is the Otto Luyken Cherry Laurel, the tree in the center is a Pindo Palm Tree, and the larger tree on the right is a Windmill Palm Tree.  I struggled a little bit with the idea of where to plant them, (remember, I'm making this up as I go along !).  To this point, I've been using the railroad ties as a divider of sorts.  I see the area on the lower side of the ties as the "patio area," and the area on the higher side as the "yard area."  Everything to this point has been planted in the patio area.  After some thought, I decided to put the palm trees in the yard, but keep them near the divider.





I've been trying to pay attention to the information shown on the tags attached to whatever plants I buy.  Generally, this refers to how much direct sunlight and how much water is needed for optimum results.  Spacing, however, is something I haven't really considered.  The Pampas Grass, for example, can get really, really large, if so motivated.  I realized after I planted them that if they grow to the 6 - 8 feet tall and 6 - 8 feet wide size indicated on the tag, I might have some space concerns on the Yoshino Cherry Tree side of the patio in the future.  

According to the tags, the Otto Luyken Cherry Laurel can reach 4 feet tall and 6 feet wide.  The spacing recommendation is shown as 4 - 6 feet between plants.  The Pindo Palm Tree can reach anywhere from 3 - 15 feet !  Suggested spacing is anywhere from 5 - 10 feet.  The Windmill Palm Tree can reach up to 30 feet tall, (which would be awesome !).  Suggested spacing is anywhere from 5 - 7 feet.  Translation:  These things need room !





I grabbed the shovel, claw hammer, bag of "garden soil," and 5 gallon bucket hoping to beat the rain.  However, Mother Nature took the opportunity to remind me who is really in charge.





I managed to get all three plants in the ground before getting too drenched.





In a few years time, I should have some nice plants and trees by the patio.





In keeping with the "simple" theme, A friend of mine gave me a box of Wildflower seeds.  





This is a small box and won't cover a very large area.  I decided to prepare an area behind the new trees, but not really in the open area of the yard to give them a try.  My thought was, "why not ?"  I got rid of the weeds, loosened a little bit of soil, emptied the box, and tried to spread the seeds evenly.





Mother Nature approved, and gave everything a good watering.  





Keep your fingers crossed .  .  .
« Last Edit: April 12, 2013, 11:07:50 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #17 on: April 12, 2013, 12:13:42 PM »

Part VI  -  Brighter colors appear .  .  .
April 1, 2013





Yesterday while I was planting the two palm trees, I took a couple of pics of the now all-white Yoshino Cherry tree. 





Until roughly one week ago, not a whole lot of activity was seen with this tree.  The colder than normal temperatures in March kept the awakening process a little behind schedule.  But once the warmer weather arrived, it's as if the tree exploded.  The clouds and rain, (as evidenced by the giant drop of water on the camera lens), do a good job of masking the color.





Today (April 1), with the sun shining, I snapped a few more pics.





Against the blue sky, the white blooms are quite prominent.











In time, this area will look different.  The Pampas Grass will make a big difference when it grows.  And eventually, I'll have a couple of really nice palm trees in the yard.





It's 74 degrees today.  The recent influx of warmth has been causing bits of green to appear all over the place. 








The best thing about this time of year is that the bugs aren't out yet.  Being outside is a really pleasant experience, even if I'm just wandering around the yard with a camera.





Out front, more color is beginning to appear among the Azaleas along the driveway.





According to my dad, the best way to get shrubs to grow and fill in is to cut them way back.  That way, they grow in thicker.  Now that I've removed the poison ivy vines, the plants are starting to look like "shrubs" again.  After they finish blooming this year, I'll give them a good cutting.





The smaller Azaleas are in the early stages of blooming.  However, the combo at the end of the driveway is doing quite well.  A little too well, actually.  The shrub is beautiful.  But, it's impossible to see to the right when pulling out of the driveway. 





The Yoshino Cherry Tree looks great when viewed from the front yard.





And finally, everything I planted by the mailbox seems to be doing well.  I keep seeing small white flowers keep appearing on the Bridal Wreath Spiraea.  According to the tag that came with the plant, it has the potential to get 5 feet tall and 5 feet wide.  I'll have to keep an eye on it so it doesn't overtake the mailbox, itself.





So far, so good for this "spring" thing .  .  .
« Last Edit: April 12, 2013, 12:18:16 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #18 on: April 15, 2013, 12:50:50 PM »

Part VII  -  Spring cleaning .  .  .
April 6, 2013





I'm starting to see more pollen around.





During this time of year, everything  left out in the open will turn to a pale yellow color.  I'm told that this is because of the pine trees.  And there are a lot  of pine trees around here !





In the case of the dark grey Cirrus, the pale yellow makes for a nice contrast.





The Yoshino Cherry tree still looks great, especially with the blue sky in the background.  The blooming season will be coming to an end pretty soon.  But for now, I enjoy the scenery.





At the end of the blooming season, the white petals begin to fall to the ground, making it look like it's snowing when the wind blows.





I kinda like the idea of having it "snow" without actually having snow. 





My Nandina Domestica garden is doing quite well.





And even if it wouldn't be doing well, I could level all the Heavenly Bamboo with the lawnmower and it would all grow back anyways.  And looking at the photo below, I really need to cut the Aucuba Japonica "Mr. Goldstrike"  back, (to the left of the Heavenly Bamboo).  It's getting a little unwieldy.





The blooming season for the driveway Azaleas, however, is just getting started. 





When I first moved to this house, all of these Azaleas were overrun with weeds and vines.  After I got them cleaned up, they started blooming each spring.  The shrub furthest from the street turned out quite well.





The shrub next to it still needs a little more work.  But, it's blooming with more intensity than it ever has.





The third shrub also needs some work. 





Those three Azaleas all look alike in terms of the flowers and leaves.  They all appear to be the same variety.  The next shrub in line, the one I have referred to as "the late bloomer," has a noticeably different look to it.  The leaves are darker, and the blooms are dark red, as opposed to a pinkish color.





The combo at the end of the driveway has always bloomed first each spring.





These shrubs weren't as overrun with vines as all the others.  Once removed, an explosion of color began appearing each spring.





It really is beautiful when it's in full bloom.  But like I mentioned earlier, it's a little too big for where it's located.  I'll have to cut it back after this blooming season ends.





All is well at the mailbox.





As seen from the street .  .  .





The October Glory Maple tree I planted last year is beginning to awaken.





I bought a maple tree because it was labeled as a "shade tree."  In a few years, I'll have a bunch.  But for now .  .  .





The flowering tree in the front yard still shows some really nice blooms.  I since have discovered that this tree is called a Japanese Camellia.  Rose-like blooms is one of its characteristics.





The Sweet Gum tree looks noticeably greener than in the last picture I took 6 days ago.





I'm really pleased with the Cherry Laurel and two palm trees I planted last weekend.











In a couple of years, I'll have some really nice greenery in this area.





I mentioned before that in my back yard against the fence, I saw a couple of things turning purple.





And, I appear to have another flowering tree of some kind in that area as well.





While checking out the flowers by the fence, I had a chance to say hi to my new neighbor who just moved in the house behind me about a month ago.





But now, it's time to get into "Spring Cleaning" mode.  In Athens-Clarke County Georgia, the Leaf & Limb collection takes place every 9 weeks.  The idea is pretty simple.  When collection is scheduled for my neighborhood, I gather all the yard waste that has accumulated since the last collection and pile all of it by the street.  The County comes along with a crane and dumpster and hauls it away.  In preparation for such, I gave the shrubs in back a trim. 





Then, I put the bagging attachment on the lawn mower and hit the front yard.  The biggest drawback with a Sweet Gum tree is the enormous amount of "grenades" that fall from it in the fall and winter. 





Hundreds of these things fall to the ground.  Walking in bare feet in my yard is not advisable  under any circumstances.





Bagging these grenades with a lawnmower can create some interesting sounds, (my neighbors probably wonder about me a lot).  It's hard to picture just how much debris one Sweet Gum tree can create.  Add that to all the pine needles, and the bags fill up quickly.





But once the calamity ceases, the yard actually looks pretty decent.  No, I won't be featured in the neighborhood "Garden Tours" that are held each spring.  But it's mine, and I don't think it looks too bad.





All I have to do is get the 14 bags of debris to the street for next week's collection, and I'm good to go .  .  . 
« Last Edit: April 15, 2013, 12:56:48 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #19 on: April 15, 2013, 01:58:40 PM »

I hate those freakin' sweet gum trees, I finally cut the one that was in my yard down. They aren't good for anything, they suck for shade and drop those freakin' bombs all over the place.
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« Reply #20 on: April 17, 2013, 01:19:17 AM »

Part VIII  -  Welcome to allergy season .  .  .
April 10, 2013





Ahh yes, that's more like it !





The official Pollen Count in Athens, Georgia for today is 4,151.  From what I read, the pollen count is a measure of the number of pollen particles in a cubic meter of air.  Normally, a figure of 120 is considered "high."  What does today's 4-digit figure mean ?





I had myself tested for allergies a couple of years ago.  Surprisingly, pollen was not one of the items that produced a positive test result.  Aside from a sneeze here and there, pollen doesn't seem to bother me too much when I'm outside.  However, last Friday (April 5), the published pollen count was 5, (yes, it went from 5 to 4,151 in FIVE DAYS ).  So it is likely that there might not have been much pollen in the air over the weekend to speak of, hence, why I didn't encounter any difficulties while working in the yard.

The yellow dust that is covering everything in sight doesn't deter the bright colors from making their annual appearance.  The driveway Azaleas are doing quite well.  Some differences can be seen in the photo below, (taken just 4 days after the previous set of photos).





I mentioned earlier that I made a few discoveries regarding correct identities of some of the plants and trees in my yard.  The biggest of which was the fact that the tree that I have called a Dogwood for the last three years is not a Dogwood at all.  From what I read, it's actually a Yoshino Cherry tree.





But have no fear.  Today, I also discovered that I do, indeed, have a Dogwood tree in my yard. 





It appears that the item I have referred to as, "the other  flowering tree in front" (next to the Japanese Camellia which, itself, was previously known as "the flowering tree in front"), is actually a Cornus Florida, or a Flowering Dogwood.  This tree has always been a little strange looking in terms of the way everything grows to one side. 





I'm not quite sure what to do about this.  If it was just one or two branches leaning to one side, I could cut them off pretty easily.  But you can see in the photo above that the whole tree  is actually leaning.  In spite of this, it blooms quite nicely every spring, this one being no exception.  Its pink blooms are just beginning to awaken.





More growth is beginning to appear on the new maple tree.





If I stared long enough, I could probably watch the leaves appear on the Sweet Gum tree, (it turns green that fast). 





The buffer between my house and my neighbor's house is filling in quite nicely. 





And between the pollen and the white petals falling from the Yoshino Cherry tree, the "snow" still seems to be flying on my patio.





I'm not quite done with this "planting" adventure that began almost one month ago.  A few more tenants will be moving in this weekend .  .  .
« Last Edit: April 17, 2013, 01:23:57 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #21 on: April 20, 2013, 12:39:44 AM »

Part IX  -  A couple more additions .  .  .
April 13, 2013





The above mentioned new additions got a ride home in the Porsche.  Lowe's is only about a mile from my house, and half of that distance is spent getting to the opposite side of my neighborhood.  Once out on the main road, I've got a straight shot from the store.  I just need to be careful with the wind and the potential to break branches. 





You can tell from the photos that I've brought two more palms home.  I just really like them, for no reason in particular.  Having discovered that they will grow quite well in Georgia, "more is better" has now become the order of the day for my yard.





I planted two palm trees back on March 31  -  a Pindo Palm and a Windmill Palm.  Today, I decided to go for a couple of European Fan Palms, one "Silver" and one "Green".  The Silver European Fan Palm will go in the large open area outside of the kitchen window.  According to the tag, a Silver Fan Palm can grow to 20 feet tall.  But the spacing recommendation is quite a bit larger than other plants (8 - 10 feet), leading me to believe that it can get pretty wide as well as tall.  This area is large enough to accommodate its height and width.





A Green European Fan Palm will also grow to 20 feet tall.  But the spacing recommendation is listed as 3 - 5 feet, giving me the impression that the Green Fan Palm will not get too wide.  As such, I decided to plant it on the other side of the yard in an open area near the end of the driveway. 





The planting principle is the same as it has been.  The tag says to dig a hole at least double the width of the pot, fill with potting mix and dirt, and create a way for water to "pool" around the tree.








With that done, I finished it off with a layer of mulch.





In time, I'll be looking at three palm trees outside of my kitchen window.  I like it !





I did the same thing on the other side of the yard.





Dig a hole, install palm tree, fill with potting mix and dirt, allow for water to pool, and cover with mulch.





In a few years, this area should look quite different.  At least, I that's what I hope will happen.





My own little oasis of sorts.





In taking my weekly stroll around the yard, I continue to notice the changes that are taking place.  From a distance, you can see that the Yoshino Cherry tree is now completely green.





As seen from the driveway .  .  .





The tree that sits next to my driveway is another one that seems to have exploded with green.  Like the Sweet Gum Tree, this tree also seemed to awaken very fast.





Speaking of the Sweet Gum Tree, it continues to grow at a rapid pace.





The new maple tree is doing quite well.





I'm still seeing flowers on the Japanese Camellia.  The rose-like blooms seem to hang around for a while. 





The petals from the blooms on the main part of the tree are beginning to fall to the ground.  But the blooms from the branches that are growing at the base of the tree are still quite beautiful.





My Leaning Tower of Flowering Dogwood is blooming quite well.





There is still a lot of color next to the driveway.  The Azalea blooms look great !














The "late bloomer" Azalea is beginning its blooming cycle. 





The monsters next to the street appear to have reached full bloom. 











I should probably do something about the lone Heavenly Bamboo plant growing in front of these Azaleas.  It kinda looks out of place.





So far, so good for Spring 2013.  At this point, I want to concentrate maintaining what I have, and trying to make everything look like it should, (especially with the Azaleas).  So, I think I'm done planting for now. 





Oh all right !  Just one more.  This will be the last one, I promise .  .  .





Lowe's can be a really dangerous place during this time of year .  .  .


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« Reply #22 on: April 20, 2013, 08:39:32 PM »

Part X  -  Ok, maybe just one more .  .  .
April 14, 2013





I honestly wasn't thinking about planting another tree the night before.  Mulch and fertilizer were the only things on my mind.  But I have said many times that Lowe's can be a really dangerous place, especially during this time of year.  Gradually, I drifted away from the mulch and fertilizer back toward the flowering trees.  I happened upon this really nice Cleveland Select Flowering Pear tree.  What got my attention is how nicely the branched were formed.  The whole tree seemed "uniform."  My autistic mind likes "uniform."  So, home it came.

Today, the only question I have is where to plant it.  After some walking around the yard and staring at open spaces waiting for some inspiration to hit me, I decided to put it out front.





This process of "reading the tag" has proven to be quite beneficial for the non-gardener like myself.  It says this pear tree will also grow to around 30 feet tall and 20 - 25 feet wide.  There is more than enough space right outside of my living room window to accommodate a tree of that size. 





This tree also likes sunlight, which is much more plentiful in the front yard than in back.





White blooms will appear in the spring, (i.e. probably like the Yoshino Cherry tree).  So placing the pear tree near the Dogwood and Japanese Camellia trees seems appropriate.





But the biggest reason for placing the tree in that particular spot in the front yard was so that when I am sitting at my breakfast bar, I will be able to look out my living room window and see a bunch of white blooms in the spring.





After I finished planting the pear tree, I spent some time wandering around the yard, snapping pictures along the way.  This has been quite an educational spring for me.  Instead of calling them "the flowering tree out front," and "the other flowering tree out front," I now call them the Japanese Camellia and Flowering Dogwood, respectively .  .  .








I learned that I have several Honeysuckle plants in my side yard.








I know that there are 3 of them in the side yard, and possibly more in back.





I learned that this sprawling plant adorned in Archbishop Don "Magic" Juan's colors of green and gold is an Aucuba Japonica "Mr. Goldstrike."





I learned that these indestructible plants, (i.e. run them over with the lawn mower and they grow right back), are called Nandina Domestica "Heavenly Bamboo."





My garden of razor wire in the back yard appears to be a form Smilax bona-nox, or Saw Greenbrier.





This would make the perfect security system.  I should take all the grenades from the Sweet Gum tree and put them under all the windows, then plant the Saw Greenbrier right next to them.  That way, someone trying to break in would get tripped up by the grenades, then fall into the razor wire.  That would be fun to watch.





But perhaps more than anything else, I learned this spring that I can, indeed, plant stuff in the ground, and it will survive !  Not only that, if I read and follow the directions on the tag, stuff can grow to be really nice.





This is a trend that, I hope, continues for a long while .  .  .
« Last Edit: April 29, 2013, 06:44:56 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #23 on: April 28, 2013, 01:04:17 AM »

Part XI  -  Almost finished .  .  .
April 20, 2013





I've had a rather active spring this year.  Between the normal maintenance that happens after each winter ends and all the additional planting I've done this year, a lot has been accomplished.  All but one of the Azaleas by the driveway have finished blooming.  Once they turn completely green, I plan on doing some significant weeding/cutting/shaping. 





My neighbor tells me that once Azaleas finish blooming, they can be pruned.  Not only does this keep the size and shape in check, pruning also stimulates new growth, (my dad also used to say this).  When I've tried it in the past, the results seem to have been successful.  When my wife and I first looked at/moved into this house, these Azaleas were in pretty rough shape.


April 18, 2009



This house was unoccupied for more than one year before we bought it in May 2009.  Note all the wild looking "green" interspersed among the limited amount of blooms in the photo above.  I would later discover that a lot of that "green" was poison ivy, something that until then, I had never had to deal with before.  While not the most pleasant discovery, it certainly was among the most informational.

Gradually, I began removing the vines, weeds, and other undesirables from around the Azaleas.  I also tried to cut them back and give them some kind of shape.  With each year, I found more and more blooms appearing, which gives me the impression that what I was doing actually worked to some extent.


April 16, 2010






April 18, 2011



March 24, 2012



April 10, 2013



My plan has been and will continue to be to try and keep ahead of the vines that crop up occasionally, remove any dead branches, and prune and shape in order to get the Azaleas to grow in thicker.  The way they look this year, this strategy appears to be working, especially when you look at the Azaleas furthest from the street.  What were once overgrown and filled with vines are now beginning to resemble actual "shrubs."











I have been referring to this Azalea as the "late bloomer," after the course it seems to follow each year.  The last 4 years of weeding/cutting/shaping have paid off.








The large combination by the street has also done very well over the last 4 years.  My goal for these plants is to scale them back to something a little more manageable.  Now that they have finished blooming, I can do this very soon.





I appear to be seeing growth occur at the mailbox.  Even though I planted the Javelin Rush grass and Bridal Wreath Spiraea a mere 34 days ago, both appear to have grown quite a bit.


March 17, 2013



April 20, 2013



I really like the way the Japanese Camellia keeps its blooms for a long time. 


February 8, 2013



April 20, 2013



The Flowering Dogwood, despite its pronounced lean to one side, is doing quite well.





I've always been amazed at how fast the Sweet Gum tree goes from dormant to fully green.


March 30, 2013



April 6, 2013



April 10, 2013



April 13, 2013



April 20, 2013



Last year, I planted an Eleanor Taber Indian Hawthorn in front of the house.  This year, a bunch of small blooms have begun to appear.








Next to the Indian Hawthorn is my rose bush.  Night foreman Larry from work suggested that I give it a very small pruning with the idea being to stimulate growth.  It worked !





I'm seeing a bloom getting ready to appear !





I'm happy with the new Cleveland Select Flowering Pear tree in front.





The October Glory Maple tree I planted last year is now fully awake.  I'll have to get my tape measure to see how much it's grown since I planted it last year.





I've been told that these shrubs could possibly be American Holly trees, although I'm not 100 percent sure.  Whatever they are, I see a bunch of new growth appearing.





American Holly could be a possibility based on the berries and shape of the leaves.





And finally, I've always enjoyed watching the Yoshino Cherry tree go from dormant to all white to fully green each spring.


March 30, 2013



March 31, 2013



April 6, 2013



April 13, 2013



April 20, 2013



Don't look for me at the Philadelphia Flower Show anytime soon.  But I'm quite happy with what I see so far.  Life is good .  .  .
« Last Edit: April 28, 2013, 01:12:43 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #24 on: April 28, 2013, 01:44:39 PM »

I like it. Aren't Cherry Trees rare? They only grow in certain areas and the red only comes out for a week or two?
I know they have a running race in Washington DC along the Cherry trees, and they try to always align the race with the blossoming of the flowers, which is more difficult than it sounds.
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« Reply #25 on: April 28, 2013, 04:56:46 PM »

Hanami

Its big in Japan - usually with Cherry Blossoms
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« Reply #26 on: April 28, 2013, 11:47:29 PM »

I like it. Aren't Cherry Trees rare? They only grow in certain areas and the red only comes out for a week or two?
I know they have a running race in Washington DC along the Cherry trees, and they try to always align the race with the blossoming of the flowers, which is more difficult than it sounds.


Thanks !  Regarding rarity, I'm going to say "no" only because I saw a bunch of Yoshino Cherry trees at Lowe's.  I have no idea about any other varity of cherry tree.  But Yoshino doesn't strike me as rare at all.  

And I'm actually wondering if I have another one in my back yard.  It's hard to tell from the photo below.  But this tree that sits back by the fence bloomed all white.





I'll have to compare leaves and bark and see what this tree actually is.





Hanami

Its big in Japan - usually with Cherry Blossoms


I'm not familiar with this at all, and had to look it up:  "A traditional Japanese custom of enjoying the beauty of flowers."  People throw parties for it.  Sounds interesting, only because I enjoy wandering around my yard for no reason .  .  .
« Last Edit: April 29, 2013, 06:48:37 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #27 on: April 30, 2013, 04:03:24 PM »

I can concur. Flowering charries, and their various subsets are quite common. I dont have photos of two of my beauties, they are at my now ex-house owned by my ex wife, which I can get pictures of later.

I planted two about 12 years ago. One in front, kind of like Todds configuration, in front a forward facing window to enjoy when looking outside from in. The other back next to my fireplace/firepit area. The one in back found its way to the septic field and has pulled an incredibler hulk on me. Grew fat, wide and green along with lots of flowers.

I was going to say Todd that one tree, way back a few dozen photos ago is plagued with what we call "suckers". It is that one in your front, that has a lot of greenery and of course some flowers coming from the base. Where I have that, long before it grows to where yours are, I cut all them off. I understand that those offshoots inhibit the growth of the main tree, take away from its nutrients. Now, how bad is it? Not sure. I know that I cut them back though, and go for the clean look. I suppose it is a matter of taste though.

I like your new neighbor. He He

Does he participate in neighborly over-the-fence discussion with you?

I liked the time lapse of the front bushes. I noticed your grenades got better and worse depending on when you took the shots.
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Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #28 on: May 01, 2013, 12:53:00 AM »

Thanks Adam !  Your reasoning is exactly what I was after  -  when I look out the window, I want to see flowers.  I suspect my yard will look quite different in a couple of years.






I was going to say Todd that one tree, way back a few dozen photos ago is plagued with what we call "suckers". It is that one in your front, that has a lot of greenery and of course some flowers coming from the base. Where I have that, long before it grows to where yours are, I cut all them off. I understand that those offshoots inhibit the growth of the main tree, take away from its nutrients. Now, how bad is it? Not sure. I know that I cut them back though, and go for the clean look. I suppose it is a matter of taste though.



I wondered about that, but never looked into it only because those lower blooms have always looked really beautiful.  Branches growing from the base of the tree are a recent addition.  They weren't there when we bought the house in 2009.


March 30, 2013




April 18, 2009







I like your new neighbor. He He

Does he participate in neighborly over-the-fence discussion with you?



I found out that my new neighbor is actually a she.  Cayenne and I had our first over-the-fence meeting last weekend.  I'm going to take her gesture of eating the leaves off of the branches of the trees at the fence as a sign of "approval" .  .  .






I liked the time lapse of the front bushes. I noticed your grenades got better and worse depending on when you took the shots.



Thanks !  I think what you're seeing in those photos are actually pine cones.  The large tree closest to the Dogwood and Camellia is a really tall pine tree.  However, referring to them as "grenades" is actually quite accurate.  You should hear the noise one of those cones makes as I run over it with the mower .  .  .
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« Reply #29 on: May 01, 2013, 12:23:11 PM »

Thanks Adam !  Your reasoning is exactly what I was after  -  when I look out the window, I want to see flowers.  I suspect my yard will look quite different in a couple of years.

I wondered about that, but never looked into it only because those lower blooms have always looked really beautiful.  Branches growing from the base of the tree are a recent addition.  They weren't there when we bought the house in 2009.

And they can be very nice. I am not critisizing a bit mind you. Just throwing that out there for discussion. In the picture below, what I believe is your doggiewood, you can see that the more current shot shows he has developed them too.


March 30, 2013



My reasoning behind my campaign against suckers started when we first bought the house that my ex now owns. The house had 5 acres of land, about two and a half were left natural, woods, thickets and all that. The north side had a beautiful thick amount of vegetation to hide the neighbors house just fine. Now, I like neighbors, but, I also like a degree of privacy. The south side of the lot butted up to my other neighbors fence, which is nice and high, but, I could still see their house which was very close as opposed to the neighbor on the north. So I took it upon my self to plant some trees along the south side, on my side of his fence. I wanted to plant willows given those are second only to bamboo in their rate of growth. And they grow full providing great privacy. The ex wanted nothing to do with that. She was aware (as was I) that they are very invasive and can tear up driveways, fences, and whatever else gets in their way. So the next choice was the simple maple. These too grow very fast and full. However, they are susecptable to "suckers" whch actually can become branches in some cases.
 But, my plan was to keep them trimmed in an effort to encourage upward growth for the privacy coverage.

I am actually going to be at the house this weekend with my camera, it is my daughters birthday and I am going to be at her party. This will allow me to snap some newer photos of the results



I found out that my new neighbor is actually a she.  Cayenne and I had our first over-the-fence meeting last weekend.  I'm going to take her gesture of eating the leaves off of the branches of the trees at the fence as a sign of "approval" .  .  .

Horses can be fun as neighbors, when I lived at my old (ex's house) house we had a horse farm at the rear of the property. Due to the distance to walk all the way back, it wasnt something I did everyday, but, there was on occasion when we had a couple or three horses running down our street in the front when they decided to play houdini with their owner.
That resulted in a call to the sheriff to let them contact the neighbors to come get their pets before they got hurt by a car.




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