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Author Topic: The Concours d'Elegance & Motoring Festival, Hilton Head, SC, November 6, 2011  (Read 87407 times)
Oldcarsarecool
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« on: December 26, 2011, 01:53:53 PM »

I guess it's about time I get these 700-or-so pictures posted.  It would be nice to be a little more punctual with posting my exploits.  But between work, life, and any other activities we as human beings are obligated to, I am having difficulty in actually getting the task done.  I'm trying, and little by little, I'll get there.  Since there are so many pics, I'll do what I've for all the other shows I've been to and post a few at a time.  This makes posting comments and questions a little easier .  .  .
« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 11:31:16 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2011, 02:38:39 PM »

The Concours d'Elegance & Motoring Festival .  .  .
November 6, 2011





Regular readers have probably figured out by now that I have a thing for antique automobiles.  For all the young people reading, the word "antique" probably conjures up an image of something from 1970 or thereabouts.  And by definition, an "antique" car is one manufactured more than 25 years ago.  So you're correct in your thinking.  My interests go back just a bit further, (think:  50-years-and-beyond further).

The Concours d'Elegance and Motoring Festival in Hilton Head Island, SC not just a "car show."  It is actually a bunch of different auto related events all bundled together into 10 wonderful days, with this year's event taking place October 28 - November 6, 2011.  Besides the actual Concours show at the Coastal Discovery Museum, visitors can also enjoy a Car Club Jamboree, a Fashion Show, lots of activities in the Kids Korral, and The Savannah Festival of Speed road races on Hutchinson Island.  

It should be noted that in the world of antique automobiles, a Concours d'Elegance is a big deal.  Some of the finest automobiles from the area, (and beyond) are on display.  The judging criteria is based on authenticity and historical accuracy, not beauty and how well the owner wiped it down after pulling it off the trailer.  Winning an award at Hilton Head means your car compares with the finest in the world.  In order to participate, you must be invited   by the selection committee.  "Walk-Ins" aren't accepted here.  

I've never been to a Concours event before.  That, coupled with my view of Hilton Head as my favorite place on earth, were reasons enough to check it out.  I threw myself in the car on Saturday morning and headed to the Island in anticipation of a great afternoon.  

This year's event was held at the Coastal Discovery Museum at Honey Horn Plantation.  In short, this is a 68 acre property with a bunch of open space that has been permanently set aside as a very impressive museum and educational facility.  Parking is available on site for a fee.  I wanted to save the $10 and parked at the nearby Hilton Head Island High School Complex, which is a masterpiece in its own right.  I can safely say that no school I ever attended looked like this place.  It's beautiful, and has a bunch of big parking lots.  Access to the Concours is via a fleet of trolley-style shuttle buses provided free of charge.  Very cool !





The shuttle takes you right through the on-site parking area and drops everyone at the main entrance to the event.  The ride through the parking area was an amazing show by itself !  Upscale manufacturers set up displays here and offered test drives for those interested in a purchase.











There was a lot of nice machinery in the parking area.





BMW was the featured marque at this year's event.  As expected, the Bimmer owners were out in force .  .  .


« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 11:40:00 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2011, 02:59:38 PM »

With BMW being the featured marque, BMW corporate rolled out the eye candy for all to see.





If you were interested in a new Bimmer .  .  .





.  .  . or Roller .  .  .





.  .  . plenty of representatives were available who could make your request become reality.  Looks like someone beat me to the above Rolls Royce Ghost.





Do you offer financing on the $246k "entry level" Rolls ?





Maybe you would like your Roller in white.  No problem.





Since this one was open, I took a couple of pics of the interior.  





It's a beautiful sea of two-tone leather and real wood.





I love the color combination !





And of course .  .  .





Unlike the "entry level" Ghost above, this one has a few more options.  Your $344k gets you the "Rear Theatre Configuration," "Front Massage Seats," and "Lambswool Floormats," among other things.


« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 11:41:49 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2011, 10:48:33 PM »

Along with the new models, several classic BMWs were also on display, like this beautiful 1999 Z8 roadster.





Only 5,703 were produced from 1999 - 2003.





Power comes from the 4.9L version of BMWs wonderful V-8 lifted from the M5 sedan that makes 400 hp.  Zero to 60 takes just a shade over 4 seconds, with the quarter mile passing by in the low-12 second range.





All this velocity should be experienced with the top down, of course .  .  .





The Z8s grandpa was also on display.





The classic 507 Roadster was the inspiration for the Z8's design.  Both are beautiful cars.





The legendary Z1 was produced from 1978 - 1981, with 456 examples leaving the factory.  Two of them were on display here.  The white car is a 1979 model.

(Editor's Note:  Even though I took a great big picture of the display card which clearly says "M1," I still spelled it wrong.   )





The unusual paint scheme comes courtesy of artist Frank Stella.  





The first BMW "Art Car" appeared in 1975.  Since then, 15 more were produced, all commissioned by BMW for its own private collection, and all painted by renowned artists.  These cars were, and still are used by BMW to showcase artistic expression.  All of them, that is, EXCEPT this car.  The M1 Art Car shown above and below is the only car commissioned for a private individual, in this case, Stella's friend race car driver Peter Gregg.  After Gregg's death in 1980, his widow kept the car for another 10 years.  Eventually, the car ended up at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City, who sent it to auction on August 18, 2011 where it brought $854k.    





The red M1 shown below is a 1980 model.





Whereas the white car above is an actual Pro-Car racer, this car is a production version.





Power comes from a 3.5L I-6 that makes 273 hp, a very impressive figure in 1980.





The matching luggage was a really nice touch.





Now remember, at this point, I'm still outside the show gates, and haven't even purchased my ticket yet.  If the scenery outside the show is this good, the actual show should be really, really impressive.  I purchased my ticket and headed inside through the entrance tent.





And with that, let the show begin .  .  .
« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 11:47:37 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2011, 06:33:39 AM »

hmmm, I think you made a mistake OCAC, you are typing about a Z1, but a Z1 is a convertible with down-sliding doors, what you have on the picture is a white M1....
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« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2011, 09:01:17 PM »

Somehow, even with a great big photo of the display card that clearly states "M1," I managed to call it a Z1.  There's ONE LETTER in the car's name .  .  . and I spelled it incorrectly !             ketten





In my defense, there was a Z1 on display in the Motoring Midway, which I'll get to next.  Good catch Scooby !
« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 11:51:12 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2011, 10:35:03 PM »

The Motoring Midway





Truth be told, I'm not sure what the Motoring Midway actually is.





If anyone has ever been to the AACA Fall Meet in Hershey, Pennsylvania  -  an absolute MUST for any auto enthusiast, by the way  -  you may be familiar with the way the event is broken down.  Several areas are reserved for "vendors," (i.e. for those people who are selling stuff, looking for stuff, or telling you about stuff).  There is an area called the "Car Corral," (i.e. a whole bunch of cars for sale).  And finally, there is the "Show Field," (i.e. cars that are being judged).

This event appears to follow a similar format.  The Concours show field is reserved for the vehicles being judged.  The "Motoring Midway" seems to showcase cars being displayed without judging, informational/educational booths, and vendor spaces.  So naturally, the first thing I see when I pass through the entrance tent is a car for sale.  A really nice car for sale, actually !





This 1963 Chevrolet Impala 2-door is a 26k original mile car that looked the part perfectly.





Power comes from Chevy's 283 CID V-8.  I love the Monaco Blue paint !





It could be yours for $24,950.





Locomobile is a name from the turn of the 20th century.








Initially specializing in steam power, the company changed directions in 1903 producing luxury cars powered by a conventional internal combustion engine.





Speaking of which, the massive 525 CID I-6, like a lot of the early gas burners from the Brass Era, is beautifully crafted and visually stunning in design.





The company was founded in 1899 and, like so many other low-volume domestic manufacturers, went out of business in 1929, but not before building some truly beautiful automobiles.





I love the Lay-Z-Boy back seat !





A beautiful and very rare car .  .  .





« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 11:59:27 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2011, 03:03:59 PM »

I've had a thing for pre-war Packards like this beautiful 1930 Model 745 ever since I was a kid.





Packard produced 1,789 Model 745s in 1930.  This Roadster body was one of 11 different configurations available for the DeLuxe Eight.





It's hard to tell from the pics because I couldn't get a really good side shot of the car.  But this thing is a 4,700 pound tank riding on a giant 146 inch wheelbase !





My Encyclopedia of American Cars says this car cost around $4,600 in 1930.  To put that in perspective, that would be more than ten times the cost of a new Ford, ($435).  The average home cost $7,100.  Combine that with the average annual income of $1,970, and you can see that this was definitely a car for the wealthy.





I love the full wire wheels !





A beautiful machine .  .  .


« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 12:03:29 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2011, 03:36:50 PM »

Across from the Packard sat another stunning beauty.





The traditional large Rolls-Royce grill is easily recognizable.





If I interpret this correctly, this car is 1 of 1 produced.





The 1930s was a great time for automotive styling.  Cars from that era feature giant hoods and long, swooping front fenders.








Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you exactly what a proper black exterior finish is SUPPOSED to look like.





It's like I'm looking in a black mirror.  All the surrounding colors seen in the reflection are perfectly defined.





Something tells me that this paint job cost more than the house I am currently living in.





Incredible .  .  .
« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 12:05:27 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #9 on: December 30, 2011, 04:31:47 PM »

Isotta Fraschini was an Italian automaker renown for its luxury cars.





Like so many automakers from that time period, I-F appeared in 1900, built some spectacular cars  -  like this 1928 Tipo 8aSS  -  and was unable to overcome the effects of the Great Depression. 





After years of just getting by, automobile production ceased in 1949 with only 5 examples of the last model, the Tipo 8C Monterosa, rolling off the assembly line.  But unlike a majority of automakers from that time period, I-F hung around and produced marine engines, trolley buses, and other luxury goods.  Remnants of the original company exist today.





As was typical of luxury cars of the day, the body on the car was produced by an upscale custom coach builder, in this case, LeBaron.








And like its contemporaries, I-F placed an equal amount of emphasis on the appearance under the hood, as well as the engineering.





The giant 450 CID I-8 was among the most powerful production engines of the day, making 160 hp.





This particular car is a 22k original mile example.





While looking at the display card, I noticed that the car owner is from Oil City, PA.





Oil City, Pennsylvania sits in between Pittsburgh and Erie, a little north of Interstate 80, (think:  SNOW, and lots of it !).  My hometown of Altoona is roughly 2 1/2 hours away.  I'm not really familiar with the area.  But when I see "Pennsylvania" while at a car show in South Carolina, I always want to say hello.  As I approached, I found the car owner talking to a man from Butler, PA, (about 1 hour south of Oil City).  Naturally, I introduced myself as "from Altoona."  As the three of us were talking, a woman approached and introduced herself as "from Meadville," (about 45 minutes northwest of Oil City). 

Well now !  I have an aunt that lives in Meadville.  When I mentioned my aunt's name .  .  . yes, this woman knew her.  It was kinda like a family reunion, only 800 miles away, and without the psycho relatives we all have.  Small world .  .  .
« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 12:11:29 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #10 on: December 30, 2011, 06:14:23 PM »

This 1928 Packard Model 4-43 is one of around 7,800 produced for the model year.





This particular car appears to have been substantially documented throughout its life.





The ribbon hanging on the grill is a Best in Show award.  





After being treated to a complete frame-off restoration, this car was awarded "Best in Show" at the 2008 Hilton Head Concours.





Yeah, it was that   nice .  .  .


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« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2011, 06:50:06 PM »

Sandwiched in between all those beautiful pre-war era Classics sat something entirely different.





This 1961 Chrysler New Yorker 9 passenger wagon, while really cool, looked somewhat out of place in this line, especially sitting next to a Packard almost 40 years its senior.





Under the hood sits Chrysler's famous 413 CID V-8  -  complete with dual quads and the long ram manifold  -  that makes 375 hp.  This is the same engine fitted to the Chrysler 300G that year.





The long ram 413 is a true work of art, and one of my favorite engines.





This particular car won the Peoples Choice Award at the 2010 Hilton Head Concours.  It's flawless, right down to the assembly line quality inspection markings under the hood.  So you can understand why.





The term "fully loaded" is definitely appropriate here.  The list of special order equipment is quite extensive and very unusual in those days.  





It's got swivel front bucket seats .  .  .





.  .  . and front and rear a/c.





Late '50s/early '60s Chrysler products had the best dash boards.  I love the unique designs, push-button transmission selector, and abundance of chrome and brightwork.


« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 12:16:38 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #12 on: December 30, 2011, 07:09:59 PM »

Like I said earlier, I've got a thing for Packards, especially pre-war Packards.  The combination of styling excellence, luxurious appointments, and thorough engineering produced some of the best cars ever made.





This car is a 1932 Packard Model 903 Opera Coupe.  And according to the display card, it is the only one known to exist today.





Even though it had trees growing up through the center of it at one point, this car was treated to a complete restoration, the results of which speak for themselves.





The wood-spoke wheels are original to the car.





The Packard hood ornament, or Mascot as they were known in those days, is called the Goddess of Speed.





The giant chrome headlamps made for a great selfie opportunity.


« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 12:19:11 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #13 on: December 30, 2011, 07:35:42 PM »

Rounding out this group of Classics was this 1913 Ford Model T.





For many years, the Model T ranked number one on the list of best selling car model of all time, (surpassed decades later by the VW Beetle).  More than 15,000,000 were produced between 1908 and 1927.





Some of you may have heard of Henry Ford's famous quote, "Any customer can have a car painted any colour that he wants so long as it is black.”  Beginning in 1914, Model Ts were painted black in order to reduce production costs.  Prior to 1914, the Model T was not available in black.  Grey, green, blue, and red (as seen here), were the only choices.





Brass fittings were used extensively for things like radiators and lighting components which lead to cars from this time period being referred to as "Brass-era" cars.





Power comes from Ford's bulletproof 177 CID I-4 engine that made 20 hp, a lot in 1913.  Its 4.5 to 1 compression ratio meant that it would run on just about anything that would burn.


« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 12:25:23 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #14 on: January 01, 2012, 11:00:47 PM »

Fast forward almost 100 years to Chevrolet's Volt plug-in hybrid.  





Next to the Volt sat the $100k 2007 Tesla Roadster.





In 2007, your 100 Grand got you 0 - 60 mph in 4.0 seconds, a 120 mph top speed, and a maximum range of approximately 220 miles on a single charge.





Tree-huggers everywhere rejoiced, despite the fact that no normal person could afford one.





But as long as we're talking about fast electric vehicles, I present the 308 mph Buckeye Bullet Electric Land Speed Racer.





This car is a product of Ohio State University engineering students, hence the name Buckeye.








Displayed with the car was a video of the car in action, which was quite cool.  Of course, 308 mph is impressive regardless.





I'm not exactly sure of the significance of the banana, however .  .  .


« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 12:28:12 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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