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Author Topic: A glimpse inside Todd's Cathouse . . .  (Read 36710 times)
Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #135 on: August 05, 2016, 12:43:12 AM »

It's not as bad as it seems .  .  .
Part 1 of 3





The cylinders that raise and lower the roof sit behind the rear quarter trim panels.  So the rear seat and all the trim had to be removed.   
 
 
July 4, 2016

 
 
The rear seat cushion is bolted in place in front.  I Removed the two nuts and lifted upward.
 
 

 
 
The rear seat backrest is bolted in place at the bottom.  After removing the upper seat belt retainers out of the way, (two small screws each), I removed the two screws and lifted the backrest upward.
 
 

 
 
Removing the top trim panel requires removing the seat belt anchor and a couple of small fasteners.   
 
 

 
 
The rear quarter trim panel unclips from the side of the car.  I didn't think I'd have to remove it completely.  So I just slid it forward out of the way for now.
 
 

 
 
With the right side done, I repeated the procedure for the left side.
 
 

 
 
I learned early on in my career that a small container to keep track of the many fasteners that are removed over the course of a job is a must have !  I keep several containers like this handy.
 
 

 
 
The cylinders and lines sit behind the rear speaker.  But removing the speaker requires removing the brace directly above it first.   
 
 

 
 
With the brace out of the way, I removed the fasteners and unplugged the speaker.
 
 

 
 
Ditto the left side brace and speaker.
 
 

 
 
The driver's seat is bolted to the floor in 4 places.  I moved the seat all the way back to access the front bolts, then moved the seat forward to access the rear bolts.   
 
 

 
 
I unplugged the electrical connectors and removed the driver's seat from the car and found $0.30 for my troubles !
 
 
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« Reply #136 on: August 05, 2016, 12:44:41 AM »

continued .  .  .
Part 2 of 3





The carpet has to be removed, which means the center console also has to be removed.  This job was a lot easier than it seemed.  I unclipped the trim ring around the shifter and lifted upward.  I also removed the two retainers that help hold the finish panel in place, (two small screws each).
 
 

 
 
I lifted upward on the finish panel and removed it from the center console.
 
 

 
 
I then removed the 4 bolts that hold the center console in place, (two in front and two behind the storage compartment), unplugged one electrical connector, and lifted the center console out of the car.
 
 

 
 
Now I can see where the lines follow the driveshaft hump to just in front of the front seat where they turn left and make their way over to the driver's kick panel.  
 
 

 
 
At this point, I discovered another silver lining within this "Dark Cloud" story.  Jaguar split the carpet into two halves, left and right, which is awesome !  With the latch hydraulic lines routed on the driver's side, I can leave the passenger's side of the interior alone.    
 
 

 
 
A few details remain on the driver's side.  I removed the driver's seat belt anchor which is bolted to the floor in one spot.
 
 

 
 
I unclipped the trim around the parking brake lever and lifted upward to remove it.
 
 

 
 
The dead pedal and the small plastic fastener above the brake pedal also needed to be removed.
 
 

 
 
The next step was to remove the scuff plate, the fasteners for which are hidden below the "Jaguar XK8" emblem which is glued in place.  I'm on the fence about this design.  The emblem is metal and inevitably gets bent and/or twisted slightly during the removal process.  So it will have to be replaced for the reassembly to look perfect.  The $27 cost of the emblem doesn't bother me as much as the idea of intentionally designing something this way.  But the finished product really looks great.  I'm torn.
 
 

 
 
With the emblem out of the way, I removed the three fasteners that hold the scuff plate in place and removed it from the car.
 
 

 
 
The final step was to remove the kick panel trim.  With everything out of the way, the molded carpet assembly lifts out of the car.  This actually a wonderful design !
 
 
« Last Edit: August 16, 2016, 11:58:33 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #137 on: August 05, 2016, 12:45:12 AM »

continued .  .  .
Part 3 of 3





The hydraulic lines can be seen in the photo below.  The are routed against the driveshaft hump next to where the shifter cable sits before turning left and going across the floor.   
 
 

 
 
The lines eventually make their way to the driver's A-pillar and turn upward.
 
 

 
 
The A-pillar trim unclips from the windshield frame.  The hydraulic lines can be seen in the photo below.
 
 

 
 
The roof latch is located above the center of the windshield.  This means all the trim has to be removed for access.  I started with the exterior trim cover.  Four small screws hold it in place, (two visible and two hidden under the weatherstrip).
 
 

 
 
The hydraulic latch assembly can be seen with the exterior trim panel removed.  The gold block near the center of the photo below is why I have to do all of this !
 
 

 
 
I may be able to see the latch at this point, but I still can't get to it unless I remove the interior trim cover.  The sun visors and overhead console need to be removed first.  The visors are held in place with small screws.
 
 

 
 
The overhead console is clipped in place.  I pulled downward on the console, unhooked the electrical connectors, and removed the interior trim cover.
 
 

 
 
And voilà !   
 
 

 
 
Now it may be easier to see how long the latch lines actually are.  They start in the trunk, snake through the interior, and make their way to the top of the windshield.  Yes, the auto latching technology is impressive and actually quite nice to have.  But is it worth doing ALL OF THIS so the driver doesn't have to reach over his/her head and pull a handle ?  I would be inclined to answer yes IF the line failure problem wasn't so widespread.  Using an upgraded line from the beginning would have prevented a lot of headaches.
 
 

 
 
I've accumulated quite a pile of parts so far.  The smaller parts fit nicely on my roll cart.
 
 

 
 
The stuff that needs to stay clean went in the living room.   
 
 

 
 
The driver's seat fit nicely under my breakfast bar .  .  .
 
 
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« Reply #138 on: August 05, 2016, 12:49:54 AM »

Remember that small piece of all-thread ?
Part 1 of 2
 
 
 
 
 
Jaguar's convertible top system uses two hydraulic cylinders and one hydraulic latch assembly, each of which are powered by two hydraulic lines, for a total of 6 lines.  All of them connect to the pump in the trunk.  So I grabbed a wrench and unbolted it from atop the Navigation DVD player so I could access all of the fittings.
 
 
July 6, 2016

 
 
The principle of replacing the lines is pretty straightforward.  But the safest way to handle this is to replace one line at a time, (as is done with spark plug wires).  The last thing I want to do is hook a line in the wrong place.  I decided to start at the driver's side cylinder.
 
 

 
 
Each cylinder has two fittings, one on top and one at the bottom.  Each line unscrews from the cylinder.
 
 

 
 
With the old line disconnected, the small piece of all-thread supplied with the line kit threads into the line fitting.
 
 

 
 
The all-thread allows you to connect the old line to the new line.  
 
 

 
 
With the lines connected together, the new line is installed into place as the old line is removed.
 
 

 
 
I carefully pulled the old line into the trunk.
 
 

 
 
One line down, five more to go.
 
 

 
 
I connected the new line to the pump, and then repeated the same procedure for the other line at that cylinder.  Two shiny new line fittings can be seen on the left side of the pump in the photo below.
 
 

 
 
The old lines were secured in various places to prevent chafing.  So the new lines needed to be secured in the same manner.  With the left cylinder done, I moved to the top line on the right cylinder and repeated the process.
 
 

 
 
A different style fitting was used on the bottom line on the right side.  I think was done out of space constraints.  The cylinder pivots fore and aft when the roof is being operated making for a tight fit.
 
 

 
 
The different fitting at the cylinder meant I had to attach the new line to the other end of the old line and pull the opposite direction.  No big deal, the end result was the same.
 
 

 
 
Four shiny new line fittings can be seen in the photo below .  .  .
 
 
« Last Edit: August 05, 2016, 01:35:54 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #139 on: August 05, 2016, 12:50:42 AM »

continued .  .  .
Part 2 of 2
 
 
 
 
 
The lines for the latch are situated on the opposite side of the pump from the cylinder lines.  The lower line seen in the photo below was the cause of this whole mess.  Each time I would raise/lower the roof, a small amount of hydraulic fluid would leak out of the crimped connection at the lower line fitting eventually draining into the wheel well behind the right rear tire.
 
 

 
 
The photo below shows the location of the hydraulic lines as they are routed across the top of the windshield.  The brown metal piece is the latch bracket.
 
 

 
 
This bracket can be completely unbolted from the body of the car, which was a blessing.  I removed the dozen or so small fasteners and lowered it away from the windshield.
 
 

 
 
Now the fun begins.  Remember when I said the latch lines were quite long ?
 
 

 
 
Most of their length is positioned on the floor of the passenger compartment.  So they aren't that difficult to work with.  It's just that you're dealing with a lot of material.
 
 

 
 
This was the hardest part of the job.  The latch lines are routed up the A-pillar on the left side of the car behind the fuse panel, (the white retaining clip can be seen in the photo below).  There is no way to get your hand in there without removing the instrument panel.  This is where the threaded tool included with the kit was worth its weight in gold !  The replacement principle was the same – unhook the old line from the latch, attach the new line to the old line via the threaded tool, and carefully pull the old line into the trunk.
 
 

 
 
Just like the cylinder lines, the latch lines got secured in a bunch of places along their route.  Below is where the lines cross in front of the driver's seat.
 
 

 
 
Several clips are also installed along the floor to keep the lines in place.  Below is where the lines cross the center hump in front of the rear seat cushion.
 
 

 
 
Eventually, all six lines had been installed.  I bolted the latch assembly back in place at the windshield and repositioned the pump back on top of the Navigation DVD player in the trunk.  
 
 
July 9, 2016

 
 
With all the lines connected and the pump in place, I filled the reservoir with fluid and crossed my fingers.  Several cycles were necessary to bleed the air out of the system.  But it worked !  I raised and lowered the roof several times, checking the hydraulic fluid level in the reservoir after each cycle.  A quick check of each line fitting revealed no leaks.  SUCCESS !
 
 

 
 
The last step was to secure all the lines in place in the trunk.  I wrapped each line with a small piece of vacuum hose before zip tying them together .  .  .
 
 
« Last Edit: August 05, 2016, 01:37:12 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #140 on: August 05, 2016, 12:54:46 AM »

I'm not done yet .  .  .
 
 
 
 
 
I took a break from the line replacement project to install the new cooling system parts, the first of which being the new water pump.  Its compact size and convenient placement made it one of the easiest water pumps I've installed.  
 
 

 
 
I installed the thermostat housing next.  It's held in place via 4 bolts, with the back two being the most miserable things to work with thanks to the confined space in front of the intake manifold.  But they eventually cooperated.  I also installed the new outlet pipe, bypass hose, and upper radiator hose.  I wasn't able to find where a metal upgrade for the outlet pipe was available.  So the OEM plastic part would have to do.
 
 

 
 
I attached the water pump pulley and reinstalled the serpentine belt.  I then connected the lower radiator hose to the thermostat housing.  
 
 
July 10, 2016

 
 
The coolant I drained from the radiator initially had a hazy appearance.  So I filled the cooling system with water and a bottle of radiator flush solution.  The directions on the flush said to let the car idle for about 20 – 30 minutes, then drain the system and refill with the proper coolant.
 
 

 
 
At the moment of truth, the car ran fine.  I let it run for about 30 minutes with the water/flush solution mixture before draining everything and refilling with the proper coolant.  Several "Low Coolant Level" and "Restricted Performance" messages appeared on the screen at random points.  But they eventually disappeared when the thermostat opened and trapped air was bled from the system.  I moved the car forward slightly to begin the interior reassembly, during which time I would run the car, shut it off, let it cool down a little, and adjust the coolant level.  Doing this several times allowed the all the air trapped in the system to be bled.
 
 

 
 
In the meantime .  .  .
« Last Edit: August 05, 2016, 01:41:45 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #141 on: August 05, 2016, 12:57:59 AM »

"To install, reverse the removal procedure .  .  ."
Part 1 of 2





.  .  . just like the shop manual always says.  I installed the interior windshield trim, overhead console, and both sun visors.
 
 

 
 
Next was the carpet assembly, (after vacuuming everything first).
 
 

 
 
I reinstall the kick panel, parking brake trim, scuff plate, and "Jaguar XK8" emblem.  The warpage I mentioned earlier from the removal process can be seen in the photo below.  Prying the glued emblem loose put a series of small waves in the normally smooth and straight metal.  It looks ok, but it's clearly evident that it has been removed.  That can be a project for another day.
 
 

 
 
I've used Tuff Stuff interior cleaner for years because it works well to remove dirt and grease from leather and plastic.  After cleaning my greasy fingerprints from the driver's seat, I plugged in the electrical connectors and bolted it back into place.
 
 

 
 
With the driver's seat in place, I took the opportunity to drive the car around my neighborhood to make sure everything was behaving.
 
 

 
 
NO WARNING LIGHTS !  The coolant level was ok.  The engine was not in "Failsafe Mode."  And there was no "Restricted Performance."  Most importantly, there were no leaks !
 
 

 
 
I reinstalled the center console and shifter trim over the next weekend.
 
 
July 12, 2016

 
 
Only the rear seat and trim remained.
 
 

 
 
I reinstalled the rear speakers and braces.
 
 

 
 
I clipped the rear quarter trim back into place.
 
 

 

Two days later, I reinstalled the top trim covers .  .  .
 

July 14, 2016

 
 
.  .  . the rear seat backrest .  .  .
 
 

 
 
.  .  . and the rear seat cushion.  The interior was now completely reassembled !
 
 
« Last Edit: August 05, 2016, 12:31:24 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #142 on: August 05, 2016, 01:03:24 AM »

continued .  .  .
Part 2 of 2





I first removed the trim inside the trunk back in May when I initially discovered the hydraulic fluid leak.  
 
 

 
 
Today, I could finally reinstall it !
 
 

 
 
And with that, my "Beautiful Disaster" had fully rejoined the ranks of the living.
 
 

 
 

 
 
With the interior freshly cleaned, the exterior looked badly in need of a wash by comparison.  
 
 

 
 
I took some time over the weekend to give the car a much needed wash and wax.
 
 
July 17, 2016

 
 
By this time, I had been driving the car back and forth to work each day of the previous week.  I am happy to report that the roof now works without leaking hydraulic fluid all over the place.  
 
 

 
 
And I'm also happy to report that the engine runs at the proper temperature without blowing coolant out of the thermostat housing.
 
 

 
 
I haven't seen any "Low Coolant Level" or "Restricted Performance" messages.  The coolant level has stayed constant .  .  .
 
 
« Last Edit: August 05, 2016, 02:23:39 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #143 on: August 05, 2016, 01:08:32 AM »

Epilogue .  .  .





I'm about one month after the fact as of this writing.  And so far, everything is performing the way it should.  Even in the midst of a hot and humid Georgia summer, all seems to be well.  The car mainly sees in-town driving during the work week.  But I've taken a few cruises to nowhere on the weekends where the car runs for 3 hours straight.  The 700 or so miles I've driven the car since the repairs have been completed have been nothing but pleasant.  So I guess the question now becomes, "what's next ?"    
 
 

 
 
Honestly, I don't know.  I've received lots of advice from friends and family.  My brother suggested that I buy a used tow truck because, "it would be a good investment," (technically, he's not wrong).  My ex-wife suggested that I, "team up with someone else who has a car for Sunday rides, just to be safe," (good thinking).  And a majority of my coworkers advise me to trade it in before something else breaks, (I think they've noticed a pattern). 

I guess I'm caught in between really enjoying the car and the time spent behind the wheel and being really weary of the drama and buying Jaguar parts.  The "trade it in" seed has definitely been planted.  So we'll see what happens.
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
I want to thank everyone for reading along, and hope you enjoyed the experience .  .  .
« Last Edit: August 05, 2016, 01:10:03 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #144 on: August 15, 2016, 06:08:53 PM »

I love reading about this. Honestly, I hate digging into the car like that, but seeing the posts makes me more comfortable about it.

I vote trade in, but that's just me and my personality. Too much work? Trade it in.
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« Reply #145 on: August 18, 2016, 11:22:57 PM »

Thanks !  Glad you enjoyed the read .  .  .
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« Reply #146 on: August 20, 2016, 10:38:39 PM »

Replacing a fog lamp assembly .  .  .
August 20, 2016





I discovered after my Fall Foliage Tour last year that my right front fog lamp was broken.





I'm not sure exactly when something bullseyed the center of the lens.  It took me several weeks to notice it, actually.  I put off replacing it for no reason other than the $100 cost, which in the grand scheme of Jaguar parts, isn't really that much.  Nonetheless, I managed to delay the repair for about 9 months.  But as long as I was fixing the other issues, I figured now would be a good time to get the job done and ordered a new fog lamp assembly.  





FINALLY !  I've encountered an issue that, a) isn't Jaguar's fault, and b) doesn't involve taking half the car apart to fix.  Maybe things are looking up for this car ?





Access to the front lighting components is via a cover in the inner splash panel.





I twisted the center fastener and removed the access cover.





The fog lens assembly can be through the access opening.  Three bolts hold the assembly in place, one of which can be seen in the photo below.  The other two fasteners are hidden on the opposite side of the assembly.





I'm doing all of this with the car on the ground which essentially makes this a blind repair.  This would understandably be A LOT easier with the car in the air.  But I don't have a lift or the space for one.  Everything I do at home is done with jack stands and a creeper, this repair included.  I can see the fog lamp assembly, but not all of the bolts that hold it in place.  So I put the new fog lamp on the ground in front of the car in the same position it would be while in the car.  This will help me find the fasteners.





I started with the bolt I could actually see only because it was easy to access.





The other two bolts don't sit level, and were much harder to reach.  But after a sufficient amount of wrist bending and twisting, they finally agreed to come out.





I disconnected the electrical connector and pulled the fog lamp assembly loose from the bumper cover.  





Unfortunately, I soon discovered that the fog lamp doesn't fit between the splash panel and front tire.  With the car in the air, I could probably remove it through the opening under the front bumper cover.





But simply turning the front wheels to the opposite direction solved the problem.  A simple solution like this is often "hidden" right in front of your eyes.





The installation instructions typically seen in a factory shop manual tell the tech to "reverse the removal procedure."  This is a lot easier than it sounds when working with a blind repair.  But after more wrist bending and twisting, the new lens went into place.





Plugging in the electrical connector and reinstalling the access cover finished the repair.





This means that, as of this moment, there is nothing wrong with the car !  I probably shouldn't say that out loud.  But this is definitely cause for a celebration .  .  .
« Last Edit: August 28, 2016, 10:32:56 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #147 on: August 29, 2016, 01:00:12 AM »

As long as everything is breaking at once .  .  .
August 28, 2016
Part 1 of 2





I've been dealing with several car-related issues recently.  I'm not quite sure if the Automobile Gods are trying to tell me something about the emblems on the hoods, (2 Jaguar and 1 Chrysler).  Maybe I've encountered that point in the life of the various components where stuff just gets old and wears out, (all three of my rides are 15 - 20 years old).  Or perhaps this is all one giant coincidence.  I don't know, and honestly, it's pointless to read into this too far.  Cars are mechanical objects designed and built by human beings, meaning they are inherently flawed from the get-go.  Stuff needs to be fixed on occasion.

My Beautiful Disaster has been responsible for most of my recent repair adventures until I got a phone call from a friend of mind a couple of Saturdays ago.  She had a blowout while traveling along one of the busier roads in the area.  I threw a bunch of stuff in the trunk of the Cirrus, (floor jack, jack stands, 4-way wrench, etc.), and headed to the east side of Athens to rescue her from the side of the road.  A really loud knocking noise coming from the rear of the car got my attention at some point during this reconnaissance mission.  I figured the heavy items I had in the trunk were floating about at will reacting to the myriad of uneven road surfaces, and didn't think much of it.

I realized I had an actual problem on the following Tuesday when I unloaded everything out of the trunk and headed to work.  An empty trunk made the still present knocking that much more evident.  Folding down the rear seat backrest while driving made it louder.  Some digging after I arrived at work isolated the noise to the left rear strut.  It looked and sounded like some of the rubber insulating material had disintegrated over the last 16 years allowing a metal-to-metal contact of some kind within the strut itself.

I ordered parts last Sunday with the intention of installing them today.





Replacing a strut normally involves removing it from the car and disassembling the various components, (the shock absorber, coil spring, upper mounting hardware, insulators, etc.).  Parts are usually replaced as needed.  However, the struts in my car are OEM from 2000.  Replacing a strut without replacing the 16 year old coil spring and rubber insulators just doesn't make sense.  Monroe makes a complete assembly for this car which makes life much easier, and much cheaper.  And a strut/shock absorber assembly is one of those items that is always replaced in pairs.





Access to the upper strut mounting hardware is via inside the trunk.





Pulling back the trim reveals the mounting nuts and a dust cover.





The black nuts seen in the photos above and below hold the assembly to the body of the car.





Removing the dust cover reveals a large center nut holds that the strut, coil spring, and upper mounting bracket together.  Rubber insulators are used in various places throughout the assembly to keep everything quiet.  The rubber insulator for the right rear strut assembly can be seen in the photo above.  The photo below shows the same parts for the left rear strut assembly.  A noticeable difference between the two is evident.  Something came apart in the left rear strut assembly.





The next step in the repair process was to get the back of the car in the air.





The rear strut is bolted to the body of the car on top, and to the rear suspension knuckle on the bottom.  Removing the strut from the car will probably require some flexing and shifting of the rear suspension.  This means I can't place the jack stands under the rear suspension for this repair.  I used part of the car's subframe instead which allows the rear suspension to hang unloaded.





I started with the left rear strut assembly.  The lower mounting bolt can be seen in the photo below.





The bottom of the strut is bolted to the rear suspension knuckle in one spot.





This is the time to make sure the parts I received in the mail are correct, (i.e. BEFORE I start unbolting and removing things).  The technician learns early on in his/her career that packaging errors do occur from time to time.  It's better to find out now if something isn't correct, (as opposed to later when you have the car apart and disabled in front of your garage) .  .  .


« Last Edit: September 02, 2016, 01:34:04 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #148 on: August 29, 2016, 01:00:29 AM »

continued .  .  .
Part 2 of 2





At this point, you can get a general idea of what needs to be removed in order to make the repair.  This case is pretty straight forward - one bolt on the bottom and two in the trunk.  I started with the bottom bolt.  But due to space constraints, I realized that I had to also unbolt the rear trailing arm to make room for my ratchet and socket.





With the trailing arm out of the way, I loosened the lower strut mounting bolt.  Here is where the above mentioned flexing and shifting of the rear suspension is necessary.  A long screwdriver created enough flex for the bolt to come right out.





With the lower mounting bolt removed, the strut can be slid inboard to clear the rear suspension knuckle.





Back in the trunk, I then removed the two upper strut mounting nuts.





With the fasteners removed, the strut lowers from the body of the car, and can then be tilted for removal.





This is another good time to double check that the parts are the same, which they were.





I'm not exactly sure what failed inside the strut assembly.  And it doesn't matter since everything is getting replaced anyways.  It's pretty obvious that a lot of deterioration has occurred over the last 16 years.





Installing the new strut is a matter of reversing the removal procedure.  A slight "tilt" can be seen in the photo below, (i.e. a larger gap can be seen to the right). 





Neither inboard/outboard nor front/rear were marked on the new parts.  I wondered if rotating the assembly 180 degrees would make the mounting more even, and there was only one way to find out.  I don't know if it makes a difference in this case, but I figured it can't hurt.





Back in the trunk again, I installed the upper mounting nuts, but didn't tighten them all the way just yet.  It's a good idea to leave them a little loose in case some additional flexibility is needed during the installation.





Using my long screwdriver, I pried downward on the rear suspension knuckle, slid the strut into place, installed the mounting bolt, and reattached the rear trailing arm.





Once the lower bolt is installed, the upper mounting nuts can be tightened, and the dust cover reinstalled.





One side down, one to go.  I then repeated the same process for the RR strut assembly.





After the upper mounting nuts and dust cover are reinstalled for the right rear strut assembly, the trunk trim can be put back into place.





I took the car for a quiet post-repair road test around the neighborhood.  The final step in the repair will be to have an alignment performed which I'll do sometime later .  .  .
« Last Edit: August 29, 2016, 01:14:06 AM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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« Reply #149 on: March 05, 2017, 12:09:16 AM »

Apparently, the fun never ends with this car .  .  .
January 29, 2017
Part 1 of 3
 
 
 
 
 
If you've had the opportunity to read the story of my 2016 Holiday Season, you may recall that I spent a lot of time singing the praises of my "Beautiful Disaster" 2001 Jaguar XK8 convertible.  The car performed flawlessly throughout the entire adventure and reminded me why I fell in love with it almost two years ago.  


November 23, 2016



I've been on a roll with this car as of late.  More than 8,000 wonderful miles have passed since it threw its last fit.  The problem is that time-wise, it's only been since July 2016, or about 6 months.  This "on/off" pattern has persisted throughout my ownership.  All will be well for a while, and then something happens.  After I fix whatever issue has arisen, I'll be fine for a few more months until something else happens.  
 
It took a month to get the unique fuel delivery issues I encountered immediately after purchase in February 2015 diagnosed and fixed.  A wonderful summer, including a trip to Indian Shores, Florida and a drive on the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina, was followed by more fuel issues in November 2015.  That "Thank-God-for-warranty" repair was followed by 6 months of calm that included a trip to Jekyll Island, Georgia for Christmas 2015.  May, June, and July 2016 were spent dealing with a major cooling system problem and replacing leaking convertible top hydraulic lines.  Once I fixed those issues, I enjoyed the next 6 months by taking the car to Altoona, Pennsylvania, and followed that up with a 4,000 mile excursion to Greeley, Colorado.  
 
Looking at the numbers, most of the time, the car is beautiful to behold, comfortable on the inside, and a pleasure to drive.  But the times when it isn't can be immensely frustrating, especially if those times are only a few months apart.  I've been stranded enough times that my local towing company knows me by name.  Yet scattered throughout those times are a lot of long trips and trouble-free miles.  The success of the Colorado trip made me wonder whether or not I finally had all the bugs sorted out.  There's no way to find that out except for going forward and seeing what happens.  
 
Going forward lasted about 3 weeks after the conclusion of my Holiday tale.  Tuesday January 17 began like any other weekday.  I backed out of my garage and put the roof down for my daily trip to work.  I noticed a faint unusual noise while lowering the convertible top.  But it disappeared right away and I didn't think about it.  
 
Everything clicked when I arrived at work to find my right rear quarter window only about half-way down.  I realized that the noise I heard for that brief moment in the garage turned out to be a lesser version of something I experienced almost exactly 4 years earlier during my Porsche Boxster ownership.  
 
 
January 12, 2013
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IoeemRh-S0U" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IoeemRh-S0U</a>
 
 
The rear quarter windows on a Jaguar XK8 raise and lower via a cable-activated window regulator.  This consists of an electric motor, a wire cable, a pulley, a bracket for the window glass, and a series of guides.  The cable is attached to the window glass bracket and wrapped around the pulley which is attached to the electric window motor.  The motor turns the pulley in one direction to put the window up, and the other to put it down.  After many years of up/down cycles, the cable gets twisted, jams in mid travel, and slips out of its guides, (or breaks altogether in some cases), resulting in the window coming to a stop, which is what happened to me.
 
 

 
 
In my case, I could grab the glass and move the window freely to a certain point which means the cable slipped out of its guides but didn't break.  But when you reach this point, the exact method of self destruction becomes irrelevant.  The regulator is toast and needs to be replaced.  I've ordered enough parts from Jaguar of Las Vegas that they probably know me by name as well, (I didn't ask).  My new regulator arrived shortly thereafter.  
 
Looking at the new part seen in the photo below may give you a better understanding of how a cable-activated window regulator works.  The glass bracket is connected to the square piece in the center of the regulator assembly.      
 
 

 
 
Depending on which way the electric motor turns, the pulley spins and winds the cable either raising or lowering the window glass bracket via the channels formed into the metal regulator.
 
 

 
 
When the cable gets twisted and frayed, it slips out of its guides, which means that I have to get up close and personal with the car once again.  The rear window regulator is bolted to the inside of the body shell behind the rear quarter trim panel.  
 
 

 
 
The experience of removing most of the car's interior last summer was still fresh in my mind which made this revelation old news.  The first step was to remove the rear seat and right rear quarter trim.  The seat cushion is removed first, followed by the backrest.  After unbolting the seat belt guide and a few small fasteners, the quarter trim panel can be removed.
 
 

 
 
With the trim out of the way, I unbolted the upper brace and speaker assembly and removed both.  
 
 

 
 
Removing the upper brace and speaker assembly allowed access to the window regulator mounting bolts and electrical connector.
 
 

 
 
The window regulator is bolted to the inside of the body shell behind the clear plastic shield seen in the photo above.  The problem is that the opening where the shield sits is much smaller than the regulator assembly.  So that means the only way the window regulator comes out of the car in one piece is through the opening at the top of the body shell.  Everything in the way had to be removed to make room.  "Everything" refers to inner and outer glass seals and the carriers on which they sit.  I started with the inner glass seal which is held in place by a combination of trim screws and plastic push-pins.
 
 

 
 
The inner seal is anchored to a carrier that is bolted to the body shell.  Two fasteners hold the carrier in place.
 
 

 
 
The outer glass seal lifts off of its carrier.
 
 

 
 
The nuts that hold the outer seal carrier in place are located in between the glass and body shell.  My fat fingers don't fit in that space.  So in order to make enough room, the window upper limit stop had to be removed.  The upper limit stop is held in place via one bolt.  The hardest part of this procedure was not dropping the limit stop and bolt down in the window opening, which, naturally, I did.  Several times !  
 
 

 
 
Now that I had enough room for my fingers, I could remove the bolts that hold the outer seal carrier in place and remove the carrier .  .  .
 
 
« Last Edit: March 05, 2017, 12:31:59 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

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