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Author Topic: xXMustangGTXx's 1988 Lincoln Town Car  (Read 9554 times)
03_TrueBlue_GT
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« Reply #30 on: July 21, 2011, 12:59:31 AM »

Well the culprit was a bad fuel pump after all. We bought a new fuel pump for 110 dollars which was a Bosch unit. We decided to do the work ourselves to save some money, and my dad wants me to work on the car so I can at least say I have done something or turned wrenches...

First off I had to drain the fuel tank by siphoning out all of the gasoline, there was a total of 15 gallons that I siphoned out of that sucker. After that I proceded to unbolt the straps and bolts that held the gas tank onto the car.. In all honesty I thought it would be a lot harder to drop a fuel tank, this one wasnt as easy, though it did give us some trouble...  There was A LOT of dirt around the fuel filler neck and around the straps, which added to the misery of unbolting this "sunofagun" as my old man cursed many a time... Then we took the old fuel pump out, gave it a good look, checked the voltage to see if it was getting power and then tossed it in the trash.

It took me and my old man about 2 1/2 hours to complete the fuel pump swap and all in all it wasnt that bad to do, just time consuming and sweating out in the driveway in 98* weather with humididty making it feel like 110*. Although it wasnt that badunderneath the car  that is so at least we had that.

Today I learned that
-Lincoln Town Cars require to be jacked as high as possible bc the ground clearence underneath the car with a modest height with the jackstands 1/2 way is not sufficient enough to work underneath comfortably, I say comfortably by meaning having enough room to get the gas tank out from under this car and be able to fit with tools,  I could barely fit underneath with the jackstands at 1/2 the way and Im 5'6 140 lbs!
-The exhaust piping on this car is really restirictive looking!
- Organize my sockets and wrenches before I use them that way it saves time and headache
-Siphoning out gas by hand really sucks.
- Having a cardboard box turned into a mat really helps you slide around underneath the car withouth hitting the concrete.. Grin
- Having the radio on in the garage really helps

Thats all I can think about so far with the Lincoln, I will keep you posted for the next episode.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2011, 01:01:03 AM by 03_TrueBlue_GT » Logged

Oznut
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« Reply #31 on: July 21, 2011, 04:15:47 AM »

This car is fucking RAD!!!!
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I love lamp.
Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #32 on: July 21, 2011, 06:31:07 PM »

Good job !  I want to say that your fuel tank sits behind the rear axle, but in front of the lower floor of the trunk itself.  If I remember right, space can get a little tight under there .  .  .
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03_TrueBlue_GT
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« Reply #33 on: May 05, 2013, 11:39:36 AM »

Well I'll be driving the old Town Car for a while until I figure out what is wrong with my Mustang. Since I only have 4 days left for this semester Im fairly confident I can fix my Mustang soon. But in the meantime I will enjoy not having to shift gears and just float along haha.

Here's a current picture of her now, paint is holding up well but the picture makes it look better than what it does in person imo.
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03_TrueBlue_GT
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« Reply #34 on: October 25, 2013, 02:08:32 AM »

Well the old girl got some new springs, shocks/struts, and a new ball joint bearing on the passenger side. The car rides a lot better now, it used to pull hard to the right and the rear of the car was soo low. Like as if there were bodies in the back low... Now that the old 20+ year old rear springs are replaced with new ones it floats just like it should now, and its a lot higher so no more scrapin!
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03_TrueBlue_GT
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« Reply #35 on: April 11, 2015, 02:50:45 PM »

Well its time for the 1988 Town Car to find a new home. We just don't want to put any more money into it. It has began leaking water into the interior whenever it rains, the heater core is bad which requires a full removal of the dash. There is body damage due to someone backing into the rear passenger side in a parking lot. It needs a new paint job and the interior seats need to be redone. Also the air conditioning is going out again. My dad is tired of fiddling around with it and he has decided to sell it.

Now for the exciting part, we are picking up a low mileage 1992 Signature Series Town Car for $3500 bucks! The paint and interior is flawless, apparently a coworker of my dads bought it and stored it to keep the miles off of it. However he has bought himself the Lincoln he always wanted and wants to sell the 1992 to my family for a very LOW price!

I cant wait to show y'all the pictures of the new car, although I feel sad for the 1988 because it more than likely will never be restored and just driven.  Sad
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Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #36 on: April 11, 2015, 09:54:39 PM »

In the grand scheme of things, most of the work that is needed isn't too bad.  But you're dealing with a 27 year old car that has a lot of miles on the clock.  I can understand wanting to sell it.  Water leaks can be a challenge, but generally aren't catastrophic.  Most of the a/c components can be replaced with little fanfare.  However, that heater core project is a nightmare !  I think you are correct in saying the instrument panel has to be moved out of the way enough so the heater case can be removed and disassembled.

My mom had a 1993 Town Car back in the day.  Wife # 1 and I drove it to Florida one summer.  Great car in all respects .  .  .
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03_TrueBlue_GT
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« Reply #37 on: April 20, 2015, 11:41:44 AM »

In the grand scheme of things, most of the work that is needed isn't too bad.  But you're dealing with a 27 year old car that has a lot of miles on the clock.  I can understand wanting to sell it.  Water leaks can be a challenge, but generally aren't catastrophic.  Most of the a/c components can be replaced with little fanfare.  However, that heater core project is a nightmare !  I think you are correct in saying the instrument panel has to be moved out of the way enough so the heater case can be removed and disassembled.

My mom had a 1993 Town Car back in the day.  Wife # 1 and I drove it to Florida one summer.  Great car in all respects .  .  .

Yeah we bought the Town Car for $1500 5-6 years ago and I think my parents are a little tired of putting money into it. We really do love the car but the list of what needs to be fixed is a little long... The list would be: having bodywork done to remove a massive dent on the passenger side and having the car repainted with a "good" paint job will cost us a pretty penny. Then the interior seats are really bad, the leather is in dire need of replacement and the door panels on the driver side need to be fixed. Finding replacement door panels is a big pain, we either search junkyards or send them off to some guy in Ohio for them to fix. Also little things that you don't think about like window motors are really hard to find for these cars. Oh and we need to fix the heater core and the a/c system. My dad and I fixed the a/c when we first bought it ourselves but now it has developed a leak and we think the compressor is bad. If we do keep it we would do it again bc we have the tools and its cheaper! To sum up, a lot of parts for these cars are hard to find which is ironic considering so many were made. I just think its the age of the vehicle and many people don't drive them anymore. It really is sad that my folks don't want to invest in the car because for some stupid reason I feel the car will go up in value as it gets older but hey I must be smoking something to think that... Grin



On to a lighter note my mom found a replacement vehicle already in town. She is going to go pick it up today. Here is a picture of the happy new owner  Grin

It's a 1996 Cadillac Deville I believe with 62,000 miles on it, that's right 62,000 for $3,500! It also comes with all of its service receipts and documentation too!








« Last Edit: April 20, 2015, 11:44:52 AM by 03_TrueBlue_GT » Logged

Oldcarsarecool
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« Reply #38 on: April 21, 2015, 01:14:56 AM »

Congratulations !  That sounds like quite a deal.  Service records are always a good thing .  .  .
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« Reply #39 on: April 25, 2015, 05:25:56 PM »

I can understand the attachment that goes with the Lincoln but the Caddy seems like such a nice upgrade in yr and condition. Especially if your mom is the primary driver. I once made a late night run on a Caddy very similar to this but dark blue. If I recall correctly it had hit a utility pole and was upside down on it's top. The driver was completely unharmed and had already fled the scene on foot. Oh, the powers of alcohol.
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