theautolounge.net
January 23, 2018, 06:14:12 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: SMF - Just Installed!
 
  Home   Forum   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 12
  Print  
Author Topic: Let the games begin, Todd's car search resumes . . .  (Read 70598 times)
Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« on: November 30, 2010, 12:44:07 PM »

With the title of this thread being what it is, you are probably beginning to formulate ideas as to where it's going, and why.  And yes, you would be correct.  The week of Thanksgiving 2010 was quite eventful for my wife and me, particularly because it marked the first time that interacting with my screwball family proved to be the least stressful part of the trip.

At this point, regular readers may be slightly confused.  When I say “The Jag,” I do mean the beautiful Seafrost Metallic 2004 Jaguar XJ8 that I purchased March 20, 2010.  







This is the very same vehicle I spent 6 months searching for, the details of which were thoroughly chronicled in my “Car Search” thread from 2009.  This is also the same vehicle I have repeatedly praised for its wonderful qualities, the list of which is long enough to make this car sound about as close to ideal as one can get.  

It is a low miles car, having just turned 62k miles.  The 300 horsepower 4.2L V-8 under the hood makes passing effortless, yet is quiet enough not to wake any of the neighbors while idling in the driveway early in the morning.  The leather seats are large enough to accommodate my 6 foot frame, and provide plenty of support and comfort for a back pain-free 700 mile road trip to visit my Mom.  Speaking of which, the two visits to Altoona, PA during the last 3 months have added roughly 3000 interstate miles to the odometer reading.  On both occasions, the trip computer displayed a 30-31 mpg average for each trip, which translates to being able to achieve 550-600 miles on one tank of fuel.  In other words, this 3900 pound, 300 hp luxury car gets about the same fuel mileage as my wife’s “sensible” 4-cylinder Chrysler Cirrus.  

So, what happened ?  Something must have happened to cause this sudden change of attitude.  I’m glad you asked.  The story of the last 9 months is long, involved, and requires lots of space, (regular readers are familiar with the way I like to tell stories !).  BE FOREWARNED, this is a really, really long post, (approximately 4000 words).  So, I encourage everyone to grab a beverage and a comfortable chair, because you’re going to be here for a while .  .  .
« Last Edit: July 23, 2011, 10:07:22 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2010, 12:44:49 PM »

Our story begins shortly after my birth in 1966.  At some point during my first few upright years, a significant event must have occurred to foster my intense love of the automobile.  I say this because there is no way this could have happened otherwise.  Both Mom and Dad viewed the automobile as something that had two purposes in life – To transport you from point A to point B, and suck as much money out of your wallet as possible in the process.  In my house, cars were not loved, cars were not appreciated, cars were not discussed, unless something was wrong with one.  That would result in lots of discussion of the negative kind.  Love for anything automobile related was never part of the equation.  So, the only other plausible explanation I see has something to do with being dropped on my head a few too many times, (which would also explain a few other things .  .  .).

But somehow, my love of the automobile grew, despite the lack of any fostering atmosphere.  By the time I was 4, I had accumulated quite a large car “collection.”







This love affair continued to prosper through my adolescence, and really began to take off as my 16th birthday approached, (think “driver’s license”).  By the time High School graduation arrived in 1984, I was seriously thinking “ownership.”  All my friends were looking a sensible first car - something of modest size, something cheap to own and operate, something that doesn't draw a lot of attention.  My first car possessed exactly NONE of these qualities .  .  .







Something else my 1965 Cadillac Deville Convertible did not posses was the ability to be legally driven at the time of purchase, (something that would not happen until several months later).  But, once I got the frame fixed, the radiator fixed, and the vast amount of electrical gremlins fixed, the highly coveted Pennsylvania inspection sticker was affixed to my windshield, and I was good to go, until something else broke, which happened quite often.  I got a lot of exercise walking with that car.  I didn’t really mind at the time, and actually miss it today.

I tell you this to illustrate the pattern that has repeated itself continuously throughout my 44 years.  I simply cannot drive an “ordinary” vehicle.  My ride has to have a unique character, and provoke a reaction from me that I cannot explain, but I’ll know it when it happens.  And so far, my autistic mind has ruled that there is no room for discussion on this issue, as a quick check of this summary of all the rides I have owned over the years shows.  

With this in mind, we now fast forward 26 years to March 20, 2010.  After 6 months of car shopping, my autistic mind has approved the acquisition of a 2004 Jaguar XJ8.  I was smiling on the way home from Atlanta, and came to the conclusion that life was good.  I now drive a beautiful low miles car that is in excellent condition, and better suited for a long road trip than just about everything else on 4 wheels.  

And all was well until August 9, 2010.  I was on my way home from work that night when, without any warning, my instrument cluster lit up like a Christmas Tree, my message center began displaying warnings galore, and all signs of forward motion ceased.  My previously “ideal” Jaguar had gone into Limp Mode.  

For those not familiar with the term, Limp Mode is a safety feature programmed into the car’s powertrain computer.  In the event of a problem, the PCM reduces operating performance in an attempt to protect the car from catastrophic damage, while, at the same time, allowing enough performance to keep the driver from getting stranded.  In theory, this is a good idea.

Limp Mode is nothing new.  Chrysler product owners have been familiar with this concept for over a decade.  In the event of a driveability related failure, your automatic transmission is restricted to 2nd gear.  GM product owners may be familiar with the “Reduced Engine Power” light in your car’s instrument cluster.  Cadillac used to advertise how a Northstar powered Caddy can “go up to 50 miles without any coolant in the engine.” Limp Mode is how this is done.  

Jaguar does things a little differently, surprise surprise.  On that night, I found out Limp Mode means engine rpm is limited to, basically, idle speed, or just enough to get you off the road to call someone.  That’s fine if you’re in a parking lot, but not so good while traveling on the Interstate.  Thankfully, I work 2nd shift, and the roads I travel aren’t crowded at that hour.  

The next morning, I loaded the Jag on a rollback and sent it to Atlanta for diagnostics.  One week and $750 later, I was back on the road again, but something had changed.  Yes, car troubles are a fact of life.  However, this particular incident happened without ANY warning – no smoke, no noises, no vibrations, no check engine light, no engine overheat, no visible problem of any kind.  It is at this point where the seed of not being able to trust the car was firmly planted in my mind.

Over the next three months, the Jag made a great effort to redeem itself.  A number of successful short trips meant that by the time Thanksgiving week 2010 arrived, I had regained a lot of confidence.  So, with a full tank of gas, the moonroof wide open, and a week’s vacation in hand, my wife and I hit the interstate for a 700 mile trip to Altoona, PA to visit my Mom.  Twelve hours later, I checked the trip computer in Mom’s driveway.  The odometer had rolled over 61k miles en route.







After 700 miles of driving .  .  .







.  .  . I averaged 30.1 mpg for the trip.  







So far, so good.  The trip to Altoona on Saturday was flawless.  My Mom has been in really good spirits for a while now, and is feeling pretty good, given the circumstances.  Life was good, and I was happy .  .  .  

.  .  . until Wednesday morning.  I was planning to start the day off with a nice breakfast at Panera Bread until I saw this .  .  .







Beginning with the 2004 model year, the XJ8 – which, itself, was all new – began utilizing air suspension at all 4 corners.  Generally, air suspension systems consist of a control module, 4 air bags, a lot of sensors, and a small air compressor.  As a whole, the modern air suspension system operates quickly, quietly, and reliably while providing amazing ride quality.

What you are seeing in the above photo is what happens when a problem develops.  In this case, the front air bags, which have operated perfectly since I bought the car, had completely deflated overnight.  I started the car to see if the compressor would pump up the front air bags, and found this message .  .  .







“Vehicle Too Low” may seem somewhat obvious.  However, this actually means that the front wheels are sticking too far up into the fender wells.  Driving the car at anything other than a crawl, or turning the steering wheel too far, could result in considerable damage to the all-aluminum body structure.  In other words, my Jag, in its current state, cannot be driven.  Great.

With the car idling in the driveway, I could hear the air suspension compressor switch on, but could not detect any raising of the front end.  However, even with the windows closed, I could hear a loud hissing from the passenger side front area of the car.  The compressor and related electronics seemed to be working fine.  But, the air it was pumping was being immediately vented to the outside somewhere near the passenger side front air bag.  In other words, the front of the car won’t lift, and I can’t drive it anywhere until it can be raised.  Great.

After a minute or so of trying to trying to raise the front end with no success, the suspension air compressor shut itself off.  This is by design in order to keep the compressor from overheating.  So now, in addition to “Vehicle Too Low,” my message center also says “Air Suspension Fault.”  In other words, since the compressor has tried to raise the front of the car with no success, it will no longer attempt to do so.  Great.

My up-until-now trouble free visit with my Mom had just become much, much more complicated.  Basically, my way home to Georgia has been rendered inoperative.  The closest Jaguar dealership is 2 hours to the west in Monroeville, PA.  And, tomorrow is Thanksgiving day.  So, even if the diagnostic process would proceed perfectly smooth, any required parts would probably not arrive in time for our Saturday morning return trip, (you just know that anything I need won’t be in stock).  Great.

At this point, I could do absolutely nothing more until the rollback arrived, which would not occur for several hours.  So, now was a good time to get breakfast like I had originally planned.  I’ll just borrow Mom’s car.  It runs fine.  When I returned 30 minutes later, I figured it wouldn’t hurt to start the Jag again and see what happens.

And, it’s a good thing I did.  The car started, the compressor kicked on, the front end immediately came up to level position and stayed there, and all the warning lights and messages disappeared.  The previously mentioned loud hissing sound coming from the right front wheel area was gone.  So, either the events that occurred earlier were all a bad dream, or the car mysteriously fixed itself, a la John Carpenter's 1983 hit film “Christine.”

Fascinating.  This tells me two things.  First, I don’t think I have a problem with the air bag, itself, or any of the lines.  Second, If the suspension will operate normally right now, I either have an intermittent concern, or a concern that occurs under specific conditions.  My thoughts immediately turned to the weather.

Central Pennsylvania can get pretty cold in late November.  During our visit, daily high temperatures hovered in the low 40s, and overnight lows dropped to the low 20s.  I now suspect that I have a cold weather related issue with whatever valve or solenoid that controls the inflation/deflation of the right front air bag.  I am also confident that since the suspension seems to function properly when warmed up, I will be able to drive it home to Georgia.

The best way to test this theory is to drive the car and monitor how the suspension performs.  I cancelled the tow to Monroeville, and decided to drive the car like I normally would.  Throughout the day on Wednesday, the suspension functioned perfectly, and stayed up the whole day.  Thanksgiving day arrived just like I had predicted, with the front end on the ground.  And, once warmed up, the hissing noise disappeared, and the front end came up to level position where it stayed for the remainder of the day.  My only concern was the fact that this time, it took slightly longer for the warm up process to occur.

So, the key to a successful return trip to Georgia appears to involve getting the front air suspension parts warmed up before hitting the highway.  I can do this.  

Saturday morning arrived with temperatures hovering around the 20 degree mark, and my front end on the ground.  







And, just like our visit with Mom over Thanksgiving 2009, the snow flurries were flying.







Today is the day I find out if my decision to drive the Jag home to Georgia was a good one.







I made sure to let the car warm up for a while in the driveway.  It took some time, more than before, but the front end eventually came up to level position and stayed there.  With all warning lights and messages cleared, it was time to head home.

On a side note, my wife and I had a great visit with my Mom.  You may remember me mentioning a health concern she has been dealing with as of late.  The pain she began experiencing in her neck over the summer has turned out to be cancer of the cervical spine.  MRI and PET Scans conducted in September revealed a bunch of metastatic tumors throughout her body.  Despite all that, Mom is doing really well.  With the intense pain now under control, she has been able to resume a lot of regular daily activities.  The downside to this is that she tires very easily, and has begun to labor somewhat while breathing.  I would summarize her condition by saying that she feels much, much better even though the disease appears to be progressing.

With the front end in the air where it belongs, we hit Interstate 99, and headed south in anticipation of a trouble-free ride home.  And it was .  .  . for about 20 miles.  At that point, a yellow warning light in my instrument cluster caught my eye.  My message center was displaying “Air Suspension Fault.”  However, the “Vehicle Too Low” warning was conspicuous by its absence.  With 680 more miles to go, this is a concern.  

As we continued on, I began to notice the ride quality diminish, especially in front.  This tells me that air is escaping from the front airbags while I am driving.  But, not enough has escaped yet to trigger the “Too Low” message.  During this time, the compressor was trying to pump the front air bags up, only to have them slowly deflate.  And, just like in the driveway, when the compressor had enough, it shut down, thereby triggering the “Fault” message.

I suspect that traveling at a continuous 70 mph on the interstate in below freezing weather causes the previously warm front suspension components to cool down enough to quit working.  In order to test that theory, it would be necessary to pull off the road, let the suspension warm up, and see if normal functionality returns.  If it does, we will still be able to get home to Georgia, albeit with a stop every 30 or so miles until we start moving into warmer conditions.  It was 20 degrees in Altoona when we departed, and it will be 60 degrees in Georgia when we arrive at home.  So, in theory, we should be able to make it.

With Bedford, PA only a few minutes in front of us, we decided to pull into Bedford Ford Lincoln Mercury.  This was a great place to stop to let the front end warm up because I worked there from 2001 to 2003 as a Service Technician.  I still know everybody there, and had a good spur of the moment visit.  And, just as predicted, once everything warmed up, normal operation resumed, and off we went.

Only one additional suspension rest stop was needed, which occurred at McDonalds in Berkeley Springs, WV.  We shut the car off for a minute, and started it up again.  The compressor kicked on, the front end came up, and all warning lights disappeared.  And all was well .  .  .

Surrounded by warmer temperatures, the Jag sailed through Virginia and into North Carolina, giving us the opportunity to regain some much needed confidence.  Wondering whether or not you will able to get home from a long trip creates a lot of stress.  But, after 6 hours of incident free travel, we appear to have dodged the preverbal bullet.  Our nerves were calm, and our spirits were up.  The scenery was especially beautiful in southern Virginia coming down from the Blue Ridge Mountains near the small town of Fancy Gap, VA.











Traffic through the Charlotte, NC metro area seemed to be a little heavy, no doubt due to the holiday weekend.  And, it remained so as we picked up Interstate 85 and headed south.  Even through the Gastonia and Kings Mountain, NC areas, where the road is three lanes wide in each direction, there seemed to be more than a few travelers out this evening.  With the North Carolina/South Carolina border about 6 miles in front of me, I moved into the left lane to pass slower traffic, and pressed the “Cancel” button on my steering wheel to deactivate the cruise control .  .  .

I felt the signs of all forward motion ceasing before I actually noticed the Las Vegas-like display of lights and messages on my dash.  I then realized that my accelerator pedal had been rendered useless, a situation generally considered “undesirable,” especially at 70 mph in the passing lane in traffic.  After some careful usage of the brake pedal, my right turn signal, and the hazard lights, I was able to navigate my way off the road onto the right shoulder.  

Now that I had some time to actually absorb what was happening, I discovered the following:
~  “Engine Systems Fault,” “DSC Not Available,” and “Parking Brake Fault” are all scrolling repeatedly through my message center.
~  Both the amber and red warning lamps directly above the message center are on.
~  Engine speed is now limited to approximately 2800 rpm in neutral.
~  All of the gauges read normally.

Welcome to Jaguar “Limp Mode,” chapter 2.  Just like the last time it did this in August, a quick check under the hood revealed no leaks, no unusual smells, no smoke, and no strange noises.  The PCM decided to declare Marshall Law and shut everything down without warning.  Only this time, I was still 3 hours from home.

As I stand on the right hand shoulder of Interstate 85 in the dark with a car that won’t go over parking lot speeds, I have several thoughts streaming through my mind.  First and foremost, I need to get off the interstate.  My wife pulled out her trusty iPhone, and determined that North Carolina exit 5 was around the corner 0.2 miles in front of me.  I could idle the car on the shoulder that far if I had to.  But, I wanted to try shutting the car off to see if anything changes.

After a couple of quiet minutes and a few deep breaths, I started the car back up to find the red warning light now off, which is good.  I think I am out of Limp Mode because the only message being displayed is “Parking Brake Fault.”  Since I don’t need the parking brake right now anyways, I waited for traffic to clear and headed toward the exit.  I had, indeed, come out of Limp Mode, meaning I had full power, and made it to the truck stop at the exit ramp.

In the truck stop parking area, I had some time, and a streetlight, to look into things a little more thoroughly.  Just like before, I could see NOTHING wrong.  The engine was not overheating and the coolant level was full.  There were no signs of anything leaking, burning, or disintegrating under the hood.  The Check Engine light was NOT on.  If it wasn’t for the parking brake message, there would be no warnings displayed, and one would never suspect any kind of a problem.

So, do we stay, or do we go.  Since we made it this far, and everything seems ok, we decided to keep going.  However, just to be safe, I opened the trunk and disconnected the battery for about 10 minutes in an attempt to clear the computer.  Upon restart, all warning messages and lights were gone.  Everything had returned to some reasonable facsimile of normal, and off we went.

Thirteen hours after we started this adventure, my wife and I, all of our luggage, and one currently problem free Jaguar arrived at home.  This was, by far, the most interesting visit to Altoona I have experienced since I moved away in 2003.

The next morning, with the Jag parked in my warm, closed garage, the suspension was up, and the car was sitting level, just like it is supposed to be.  In fact, the front suspension has yet to perform any way other than perfect in the time since we have been back in Georgia.  Likewise, not one warning light or message has appeared since disconnecting the battery on Saturday.  I have some thoughts as to why I had so many issues on this trip.  But, at this point, all I am hoping for is for the Jag to stay running properly just long enough for me to trade it in.

However, unlike my last car search adventure, I now have a time limit in place.  Our next visit to Altoona to visit my Mom will take place over the Christmas holiday.  My wife’s desire is to have another car by the time that trip arrives.  She wants this car to be something that I want, not something she has talked me into.  But, if I don’t find anything right away, we are going to trade the Jag on a car for her.  I will get the Cirrus for the winter, after which I can start looking for a replacement.

Strangely enough, I don’t mind this arrangement.  The good part is that since she will have the traveling car, I would be free to get my 1960s whatever collector car I can afford.  Plus, right now, my wife wants a Lincoln MKZ with all the bells and whistles.  Not bad .  .  .







Her primary requirement is that It MUST have low miles, i.e. less than 20k.  A Ford CPO car with an extended warranty would be really great.

So, for everyone who is hoping I create another long car search thread with lots of details, I will do my best to satisfy everyone.  Given the time frame, this may be a little challenging.  But, we’ll see.  Just like last time, questions, comments, and suggestions are always welcome .  .  .
« Last Edit: September 01, 2012, 04:45:44 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

Elmo187
Newbie
*
Posts: 12



View Profile
« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2010, 01:33:27 PM »

If you want American luxury, the MKZ would be great. But, there's also the 1st generation CTS you could look at, too.
Logged

When asked why they shot the suspect 68 times, Sheriff Grady Judd responded with "That's all the bullets we had."
Rather B.Blown
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 1820



View Profile
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2010, 08:09:33 PM »

I'm really sorry to hear that Todd. I hoped the last problem you had would've just been an isolated thing, but after this I'm with you. Get rid of it quick.

Sent you a PM.
Logged



Fox
Guest
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2010, 08:28:44 PM »

Nah, she want a MKX..  Grin

Such a shame for the Jag, it is a really elegant car. So.. what are you thinking of buying?
Logged
irish evo6's
Master
*****
Posts: 680



View Profile
« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2010, 09:53:47 PM »

What you need is a bently





Cheesy
Logged



"when the world says 'give up', hope whispers 'try one more time'"
Syncros
Master
*****
Posts: 923



View Profile
« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2010, 11:17:03 PM »

I'd be concerned about replacing problematic Ford luxury product with another Ford luxury product.

Just some idea's. Infiniti M is highly rated at the moment, Lexus products have always been good, New Buick Regal is supposed to be good. Genesis Sedan is well priced and backed with a great warranty, I personally think its a great car.




Logged
Oldcarsarecool
Senior Turd Polisher
Administrator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 4657


A blind squirrel looking for a nut . . .


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: November 30, 2010, 11:57:19 PM »

Thanks guys.  I appreciate all the comments .  .  .





If you want American luxury, the MKZ would be great. But, there's also the 1st generation CTS you could look at, too.

A CTS is something we had talked about, and may end up being a serious contender.  There is an '05 with 15k miles on the clock in the Atlanta area that I might look into.  A "V" car would be nice.  But, a low miles example is probably still way too expensive.





Nah, she want a MKX..  Grin

Such a shame for the Jag, it is a really elegant car. So.. what are you thinking of buying?

I'm not a big fan of the Edge/MKX.  It's just not my kind of vehicle.  The Zephyr/MKZ came about because my wife has always liked the Ford Fusion.  The Lincoln version is much more elegant, especially on the inside.

Interesting fact:  With retro currently "in" right now in the automotive industry, Lincoln stylists wanted to capitalize on this trend with the new MKX.  The design of the car's grill .  .  .



.  .  . was directly influenced by the stunning 1964 Lincoln Continental .  .  .



I probably don't have to tell you which one I would choose .  .  .





What you need is a bently





Cheesy

Somehow, I don't think I would have to twist my wife's arm too much if I showed up with one of those.   Grin





I'd be concerned about replacing problematic Ford luxury product with another Ford luxury product.

Just some idea's. Infiniti M is highly rated at the moment, Lexus products have always been good, New Buick Regal is supposed to be good. Genesis Sedan is well priced and backed with a great warranty, I personally think its a great car.


You have a valid point.  Both cars are part of the Ford family.  And, just like any modern vehicle, both will cost a good bit to service, (although Jaguar parts prices may be even more insane than Lincoln parts prices).  However, the biggest difference between the two products is serviceability.  Ford Lincoln Mercury dealers are all over the place.  My nearest Jaguar dealer is either 1.5 hours west in Atlanta, or 2 hours east in Greenville, SC. 

Your suggestions are all good, especially the Infiniti M.  The M45 is a cool car !  Lexus quality is second to none.  However, except for a few very notable examples, I find the entire Toyota brand to be the automotive equivalent of watching paint dry.  The Regal and Genesis may be too expensive at this point, although I haven't looked into this yet .  .  .
« Last Edit: November 30, 2010, 11:59:28 PM by Oldcarsarecool » Logged

MontereyDave
Grand Master
******
Posts: 1475



View Profile
« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2010, 01:20:19 AM »

Sorry to hear about the problems with your flagship Jaguar.  Dare I suggest another Jaguar  perhaps more aptly described as a Ford incognito as a Jaguar since underneath the skin I think it is mostly Ford.  I don't think the X-Type has limp mode or the four air bag suspension.  Its 3.0L V6 should prove reliable and easy to maintain.  I imagine it could be serviced by Ford dealers so you shouldn't have to trek distances to reach a Jag dealer.  And, it has AWD for those trips to PA.  The rare wagon would be an especially great find.  It is a beautiful car inside and out.  I especially like the wood and contrasting color piping on the leather.  The prices seem very reasonable even for low mileage examples and it was produced for many years up to 2008 and if you buy from a Jag dealer they might even give you a better trade-in value on your car because they specialize in selling Jags.  But, on the other hand it is hard to resist the 100K miles warranty and quality workmanship of modern day Hyundais.

I pulled these pics from current eBay ads.





















Logged

Imran
So nice to meet you.
Global Moderator
Grand Master
*****
Posts: 2506


So nice to meet you.


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: December 01, 2010, 01:25:13 AM »

now this may be an "old man" car, but i've always loved lincoln town cars.
Logged
SpiderX1016
Grand Master
******
Posts: 1377


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: December 01, 2010, 02:32:32 AM »

Well, you said it didn't have a soul but it's damn reliable Smiley
I got the TL some time in March around the same time you got the Jag and not one problem has come up.
Logged

"Under the sky, under the heavens there is but one family. It just so happens that people are different." - Bruce Lee
MontereyDave
Grand Master
******
Posts: 1475



View Profile
« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2010, 08:51:47 AM »

now this may be an "old man" car, but i've always loved lincoln town cars.

Ditto, a Town Car has class!  Especially if you get a Town Car that doesn't look like a chauffeured typically black Town Car.  Perhaps blue or gold or maroon or silver one with a moonroof.  I think it would also be cool to put some 18" chrome Bullitt Mustang rims on a Town Car with Lincoln center caps and a pair of Magnaflow or Ford Racing Perf Products FRPP GT500 catbacks like I had on my Mustang.
Logged

03_TrueBlue_GT
Grand Master
******
Posts: 1834


Doug


View Profile
« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2010, 01:24:15 PM »

You want a town Car eh? Want one like ours? Grin



Sorry to hear about the Jag OCAC, everything happens for a reason so Im sure you will find something great for y'all.
May I suggest a 2005 Land Rover? Grin I was watching a TG episode and it was an old one about the 2002/2003 Land Rover, I went online Autotrader and found a couple with low mileage around 20 grand range, but I think they are worth the money cause they still look brand spanking new... Grin

Still I cant wait to read your write ups!
Logged

FabZ
Grand Master
******
Posts: 1096


View Profile
« Reply #13 on: December 01, 2010, 04:10:33 PM »

sometimes yellow gems are frozen lemons, one just has to thaw them out.. sorry to hear about your prize.

on another note, how about looking in to some of the mid-sized audis? I did see an mkZ driving today and thought it looked alright, it's kind of awkward looking, person inside looked comfy though.
Logged

Hey, I just passed you; and this is crazy. But, I'm in fourth gear, Vtec baby...
Moth
Full Member
***
Posts: 246


View Profile
« Reply #14 on: December 01, 2010, 04:49:03 PM »

You know you want to..

Logged

88 Caprice- 305ci/700r4 combo, 75k miles

09 Challenger R/T- 5 speed auto, Stock for now
Kills: 98+ Camaro Z/28, 07 Mustang GT, Mazdaspeed3.
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 12
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC
SimplePortal 2.2 © 2008-2009
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!