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Author Topic: Made a deal, got a gun  (Read 1779 times)
Whitechapel
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« on: May 22, 2010, 10:23:48 AM »

I traded a cheap collectible knife, so now i own a Raven MP-25 .25 cal pistol. I don't know much about it but i know FFD and a few other of you guys are into guns. Any input? It has a broken firing pin BTW which im told is an easy fix.
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Fuel Fire Desire
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« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2010, 01:08:15 PM »

....well......... I wouldnt go as far as calling the .25 a "worthless" caliber.....but its almost there. 


The caliber itself was designed to be a somewhat more reliable version of the .22lr for use in pistols, primarily pocket pistols. They did this by doing two things, adding a centerfire primer (instead of a rimfire), and enlarging the bullet diameter enough to where a full metal jacket could be used (instead of plated lead). Unfortunately, a larger caliber does not equate to a more powerful round. By the numbers, the .25 auto is actually LESS powerful than the .22, both in mussel velocity and mussel energy (in some loadings less than HALF the energy). The reason why? The powder charge is essentially the same for both calibers, but since the .25 is larger and slightly heavier, the expanding gasses have to expand more and can not propel the bullet as fast.



Here is an assortment of popular pistol calibers to give perspective. In order from left to right they are .22lr, .25 auto, .380 auto, 9mm, .357 sig, .40 S&W, .45 auto, 5.7mm FN, and .50 AE. 



.25 auto with a centerfire primer compared to a .22lr rimfire primer.





As far as effectiveness and practicality....well....more bad news. Contrary to popular belief, the .25 auto equipped with a hollow point bullet will not be more effective than a standard ball round. The .25 just does not have the power to penetrate and expand. It is because of this, that the .25 will not likely stop an attacker. The low velocity and low penetration will not immediately stop a person. It will hurt like hell, sure, but it will not induce a hydrostatic shock, and likely will not penetrate far enough to cause catastrophic bleeding to the point of timely incapacitation. In fact, most people who are fatally shot with a .25 do not die from the bullet wound itself, but rather the infection. It is because of this little fact that gives the .25 a NASTY reputation on the street, both in the eyes of police and thugs. The thought is, if you want retaliation against one of your enemies, dont give them a quick death with a .45......shoot them with a .25 and let them suffer over the course of a week and die from a massive infection.

The .25 is not great for target shooting either. The low velocity lets the bullet drop rather quickly, resulting in poor accuracy. It is also quite expensive to shoot, because even though its as small as a $0.03 .22 cartridge, it still requires all the manufacturing steps and parts as a $0.50 .45 cartridge. Combine that with its low popularity and low production volumes, and that gives you a steep price for a weak round. Current pricing is ranging from $0.40/ea for cheap target rounds all the way up to $2.15/ea for corbon self defense ammo.


On to the pistol itself.

These kinds of pistols are known as "saturday night specials" because they are typically bought, used, and discarded all in a single saturday night. They are typically worth $50-$100 (gunbroker shows that MP-25 in the $75 range) and are only designed to function for ~200 rounds before failing. Like stated before, its not a target pistol, but rather a disposable one time use pistol.


Personally, I would never own a .25 auto. Modern .380 pocket pistols have much more power, and are designed to last as long as full size pistols. BUT.... a knife for a gun trade (assuming the knife was worth less than $100) is a good trade. At the very least, you can keep this tucked away in your glove, tackle, or tool box "just in case" (where law permits).


Even though I pack a quite large and powerful full size M&P in .357 sig, I also have a pocket pistol for uses stated above. Though, mine is a revolver chambered in .22lr/ magnum, and built to the same standards as a full size magnum revolver which shoots its msrp to over $300.

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Palomba
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« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2010, 02:30:26 PM »




.45, so you only have to tell them once Smiley
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RatherBNarizona
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« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2010, 03:46:06 PM »

you might be able to stop a squirrel... with a full clip.   Grin
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Mac
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« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2010, 12:13:12 PM »

lol guns.
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LSixer
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« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2010, 12:44:24 PM »



Here is an assortment of popular pistol calibers to give perspective. In order from left to right they are .22lr, .25 auto, .380 auto, 9mm, .357 sig, .40 S&W, .45 auto, 5.7mm FN, and .50 AE. 

.45 auto, Mmmmmm Stick a few in one of these and I am off to the races.




lol guns.

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